Ed Fisher dies at age 86

 

Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker’s cartoon editor has announced on his blog that long time New Yorker cartoonist, Ed Fisher has died at age 86.  Mr. Fisher contributed over 700 cartoons to the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 27, 1951.  His last cartoon appeared January 17, 2000 (this last cartoon appears on Bob Mankoff’s blog post along with several others). His New York Times obit (April 8, 2013) contains a good deal of biographical information.

 

The New Yorker’s former Art Editor/Cartoon Editor, Lee Lorenz, wrote in his book The Art of The New Yorker 1925 – 1995, that Ed was among the small pool of cartoonists once considered to succeed James Geraghty as Art Editor when Geraghty announced his retirement in 1972 after holding that position since 1939 (other candidates included Charles Barsotti and Donald Reilly).  Lorenz was appointed by the magazine’s editor, William Shawn, to succeed Geraghty in 1973.

 

Ed was among the generation of cartoonists — those who began contributing to the magazine before Lorenz became Art Editor —  whose cartoon ideas were often secured for the more established artists, like Whitney Darrow, Jr., George Price, or Peter Arno. In a letter dated September 2000, Ed wrote to me of his experience:

“…Geraghty would take one of my roughs and say ‘this one’s perfect for Arno.’ And sometimes I’d reluctantly agree and sometimes not. Jim harvested gags for several of the great masters from us newcomers…and now and then, leafing in one of the albums [those hardcover collections of cartoons the magazine once published]  I’ll suddenly remember: that’s my gag!”

 

Four collections of Fisher’s work were published: Ed Fisher’s First Folio (Macmillan,1959), Wine, Women and Woad: A Tale of Decadent Rome (Macmillan, 1960), and Ed Fisher’s Domesday Book (St. Martin’s, 1961). He was also a co-editor of The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons (Scribner, 1975).  Maestro, Please!  a collection of musician themed cartoons was published by Applause Books in the 1990s.

 

In the Foreward to his Domesday collection, Ed wrote:

You can judge a man not only by the company he keeps but by the jokes he tells. Gather a bundle of his jokes, lay them out neatly, study them — and you will find his philosophy of life, revealed, as in an essay.

 

By the time I met Ed he was a twenty-seven year veteran at The New Yorker, yet his demeanor suggested he had just walked into the office for the very first time to present his batch of cartoons to the editor. Energetic, open, supportive — a fellow enjoying to the hilt the strange world and community he was devoted to.

 

 

Below: Donald Reilly, Warren Miller, Ed Fisher and Joe Farris during a much needed break at the Arnold Newman photo shoot along the Hudson River, NYC,  1997. (photo by Liza Donnelly).

Go See Danny Shanahan’s Website

 

We let you know sometime back that Danny Shanahan had a website in the works, and now you can see it in its finished state here. Among the fun stuff on the site are some of Danny’s rejected work, and a category “Raw Nerve” that just might hit a…well, you know.

Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art Arts Festival this Weekend with Feiffer, de Seve, and Others

 

With The Society of Illustrators as co-presenters, MoCCA’s Arts Festival returns for 2013 with its traditional mix of special guests and events.  Among those  in the festival whose work has appeared in The New Yorker are Jules Feiffer, Peter Kuper, the illustrator Arnold Roth and cover artist Peter de Seve. The event is this coming Saturday and Sunday (April 6th & 7th at the 69th Regiment Armory at 68 Lexington Ave., NYC).

For all the information on the festival, including Special Guests, Events, a floor plan of the booths, all participants, and more, link here.

Latest One Club Member: T. Waldeyer

Researching the illustrator William Auerbach-Levy this morning I ran across T. Waldeyer who had one drawing published by The New Yorker in the issue dated February 12, 1927.  T. Waldeyer enters The New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z, with her(?)/his(?) listing in red as she’s/he’s a member of the “One Club” (reserved for cartoonists who were published just once by The New Yorker during their careers).

If anyone has any information about T. Waldeyer, please forward to me using the “Contact” link on the right.