Audio: Gil Roth Interviews R.O. Blechman; Mike Lynch Looks Back at Esquire’s Cartoons; A Playboy Cartoon

Gil Roth continues his remarkable  string of cartoonist/illustrator interviews — this week he speaks  with the great R. O. Blechman. One of my all-time favorite Blechman New Yorker covers (and one of my favorite all-time New Yorker covers, period) is shown to the left. (photo credit: Gil Roth)

Listen to the podcast here. 

Link here to Mr. Blechman’s website

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With Esquire suddenly in the cartoon conversation, Mike Lynch takes a look at some of the work and cartoonists that appeared there in days of yore.  Read it here. 

 

 

 

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And speaking of magazines that once ran cartoons, Playboy seemingly has recently returned to the fold. Tom Toro posted this cartoon on Instagram, writing,  “My cartoon in the current issue of @playboy”:

 

 

Paul Karasik Delivers Commencement Speech at the Center For Cartoon Studies; CBS This Morning Podcast: Liza Donnelly Talks About Live-Drawing at The White House; Attempted Bloggery Spotlights An Obscure New Yorker Cartoonist

From Vermont’s Valley News, May 13, 2017, “‘It’s OK to Flounder’: Paul Karasik Advises CCS Grads” — this piece on Mr. Karasik’s commencement speech delivered to the Center for Cartoon Studies  11th graduating class.

Link here to Paul Karasik’s New Yorker work.

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Here’s a CBS News podcast, “Drawing At The White House”  featuring Liza Donnelly talking about her recent experience live drawing at The White House for CBS This Morning. (Ms. Donnelly is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist).

Link here to Ms. Donnelly’s website (where you’ll find links to her New Yorker work).

left: Ms. Donnelly on the White House lawn

 

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Attempted Bloggery has thrown its spotlight on a somewhat obscure (very obscure?) New Yorker cartoonist, William Von Riegen. Read the AB  post here. 

left: a Von Riegen New Yorker drawing in the issue of November 12, 1938. 

“A Very Complicated Thing”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 At the recent event covered here on the Spill (“Wall-To-Wall Cartoonists at David Remnick’s Hello Goodbye Party”) Mr. Remnick said of the New Yorker‘s former cartoon editor, Mr. Mankoff:

“I want to tell you that Bob’s effort to bring not only the work of cartoonists and artists who’ve been around for quite awhile forward, and to put them in their best light, but also to bring new artists into the picture, which is a very complicated thing, has been an enormous boon to the New Yorker…”

 Mr. Remnick’s focus on  the magazine’s cartoonists was notable and welcome.  It struck me while reading the recent news pieces about Mr. Mankoff’s departure as The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor  that all of them focused primarily, and nearly exclusively on Mr. Mankoff himself and his work as a cartoonist, with nary an exploration of exactly what happened with and to the magazine’s cartoonists and cartoon department during the past 20 years during his watch. Of course it makes perfect sense to focus on him — after all, he was the cartoon editor, and his departure was news,  but surely the greater part of his legacy are all those cartoonists that swelled the magazine’s stable these past twenty years.  I’m slightly puzzled as to why several of these news pieces showed us, almost in the form of a greatest hits or a summing up of his career, a good number of Mr. Mankoff’s own cartoons — he’s not retiring as a cartoonist, and in fact has said he will continue to submit work.  My puzzlement is over the absence of discussion of the 128 new cartoonists he brought in to the magazine (Mr. Mankoff mentioned, but only in in passing, 17 of his discoveries in one piece. That only leaves 111 more to talk about).

R.C. Harvey did a long piece that appeared in late March on The Comics Journal site looking at Mr. Mankoff’s editorship.  Selfishly, perhaps, I’m hoping there will be more such pieces looking at how the New Yorker‘s cartoons changed, for better or worse, during these past 20 years; how Mr. Mankoff shaped those changes; and how those changes affected the culture of the New Yorker cartoon department and the cartoonists themselves.  In other words, a critical examination of the Mankoff years. “A very complicated thing” is a thing worth exploring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billy Ireland Opens Its Archives, Digitally

 

 

 

 

Just announced: Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library  & Museum has put its original art and book holdings online.  This is no small thing as they have over 200,000 items in their collection.

I noted in the Museum’s description of their holdings (below, in pink) that single panel cartoons (such as those found most famously in The New Yorker) aren’t mentioned, but they are certainly there, including the recently donated works of Jack Ziegler. 

MCA’s collection consists of approximately 200,000 items, including 83,214 original drawings from all genres of cartoon art (comic strips, comic books, animation, editorial, advertising, sport, caricature, greeting cards, graphic novels, and illustrations)…

  A Finding Aid is promised soon, which will make searching less of a guessing game as to who is included in their collection (of course, that game can be fun). Also searchable are their book holdings. I’ve shown a partial screen grab of what turned up when I searched in “Art” for Peter Arno. You’ll find links to both “Art” and “Books” by going here.

Congratulations and thanks to the Museum for providing us with this wonderfully exciting resource.

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; The Tilley Watch: Blitt’s Comey Cover; American Bystander #4

Cartoon Companion is back with  their rated look at this week’s New Yorker cartoons.  The reviewers, “Max” and “Simon” (not their real names) along with a Mystery Cartoonist, examine among others, an unusual police line-up, some NYC candles, a honeycomb, a couple of pigs in a restaurant, and a superhero with a generous waistline.  Read it here.

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…next week’s New Yorker cover (by Barry Blitt) is getting a lot of attention. Here it is:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The 4th American Bystander has finally found its way to my desk, and as with the previous three numbers, it doesn’t disappoint.

A large number of New Yorker contributors are represented: Charles Barsotti, George Booth, Steve Brodner (who did the cover), M.K. Brown, Roz Chast (a full page), John Cuneo, Nick Downes, Liana Finck (represented by a 3 page spread), Drew Friedman, Sam Gross, Bob Grossman, John Jonik, Farley Katz, Ken Krimstein, Peter Kuper (a double page spread), P.S. Mueller (a full page), Rich Sparks (a full page), Shannon Wheeler (a 4 page spread), and Jack Ziegler.

For more information, and to order a copy go here.

 

 

Wall-to-Wall Cartoonists at David Remnick’s Hello Goodbye Party

 The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick threw a Hello Goodbye party last night (Hello, Emma Allen, the magazine’s new cartoon editor; Goodbye, Bob Mankoff, the former cartoon editor). It was, by far, the largest gathering of New Yorker cartoonists since  1997, when forty-one gathered for an Arnold Newman group photo (it appeared in the magazine’s first cartoon issue, December 15, 1997). Here are a bunch of photos from the evening, courtesy of Liza Donnelly, the Spill‘s official photographer for the evening; additional  photos by  Sarah Booth, Marshall Hopkins, and Paul Karasik.

Photo above, l-r: Drew Dernavich, Sarah Booth, John Klossner, George Booth, Chad Darbyshire (back to camera), Matt Diffee, (New Yorker writer) Sarah Larson, Ken Krimstein, Bob Mankoff, Eric Lewis, Bob Eckstein

Edward Koren and Francoise Mouly (The New Yorker‘s Art Editor)

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor, and Stanley Ledbetter, the magazine’s jack-of-all trades.

 

 

 

 

 

George Booth and Roz Chast.  That’s Lars Kenseth in the background (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Karasik, Liana Finck and Gabrielle Bell (photo courtesy of Paul Karasik)

 

 

 

 

Jason Adam Katzenstein, unidentified, Roz Chast speaking with Sara Lautman (back to camera), and Chris Weyant far right.

 

 

 

Chris Weyant (partially obscured), Farley Katz, unidentified, David Sipress, New Yorker writer Matt Dellinger (in checked shirt), Andy Friedman, Danny Shanahan. The group in the back: Drew Panckeri, Mitra Farmand, Sara Lautman, Kendra Allenby

 

Sam Gross and Robert Leighton

 

Bob Mankoff and David Remnick

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Cater, with the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

George Booth and David Borchart

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Dator and Peter Kuper

 

 

Felipe Galindo and Carolita Johnson

 

 

 

John O’Brien and Bob Eckstein

 

 

Three former cartoon department assistants: Marshall Hopkins, Emily Votruba, and Andy Friedman (photo courtesy of Marshall Hopkins)

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Paul Noth

 

 

Matt Dellinger with  Stanley Ledbetter, and Matt Diffee (and way back by the window: Chad Darbyshire to the left, and Amy Hwang to the right)

 

 

 

 

P.C. Vey and Trevor Hoey

 

 

 

 

 

Kim Warp, Pat Byrnes, and George Booth

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Roz Chast

 

 

 

 

l-r: P.C. Vey, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, George Booth, and Michael Maslin (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Liana Finck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Lars Kenseth

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Lewis, Andy Friedman, and Barbara Smaller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Byrnes, Paul Karasik, and Peter Kuper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marc Philippe Eskenazi and Ben Schwartz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie Hankin, Amy Hwang, Kendra Allenby, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

Marshall Hopkins with Bob Mankoff’s first assistant, Emily Votruba (Mr. Hopkins was also at one time Mr. Mankoff’s assistant)

 

 

 

Far left: David Sipress speaks with Andy Friedman.  Foreground: Barbara Smaller, Emily Flake and P.C. Vey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

l-r: Felipe Galindo, Marshall Hopkins, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, and Ed Koren

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Koren, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly and a photobombing David Remnick. That’s Charlie Hankin in the back, far right.

 

 

 

 

Here’s an  incomplete list of all the cartoonists who were there (if you were there and don’t appear on this list, please let me know)

Kendra Allenby, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Chris Cater, Roz Chast, Joe Dator, Chad Darbyshire, Drew Dernavich, Matt Diffee, Liza Donnelly, Bob Eckstein, Mitra Farmand, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat), Felipe Galindo(aka feggo), Mort Gerberg,  Sam Gross, Charlie Hankin, Marshall Hopkins, Amy Hwang, Edward Koren, Trevor Hoey, Carolita Johnson, Paul Karasik, Farley Katz, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Lars Kenseth,  John Klossner, Ken Krimstein, Peter Kuper, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, Robert Leighton, Eric Lewis, Bob Mankoff, Sam Marlow, Michael Maslin,  Paul Noth,  Jeremy Nguyen, John O’Brien, Drew Panckeri, Corey Pandolph, Ellis Rosen, Jennifer Saura, Ben Schwartz, Danny Shanahan, David Sipress,  Avi Steinberg, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Chris Weyant.  

The New Yorker Cartoon Editor’s First Look Day

Yesterday was a starred day on many New Yorker cartoonist’s calendar — it was  Emma Allen’s first Look Day in her new position as the magazine’s cartoon editor.  Look Day is the day cartoonists have traditionally come into the magazine’s offices to sit with the editor and hand over their latest work.  In an email to contributors a few weeks ago, Ms. Allen suggested that Look Days with her “won’t really involve you handing over cartoons to be reviewed in person (although I’m happy to take a look if you’d like), but rather will be a chance for catching up and checking in…”

Admittedly, I’ve never done the Look Day thing (a habit begun in my earliest days going into the office, when I’d drop off my work with a receptionist at the end of a hallway, then make my escape via the nearby elevator).  Back then, the idea of sitting across from Lee Lorenz while he looked at my work was unimaginable (and scary). So unimaginable that not going in turned into a habit. I like the sound of Ms. Allen’s Look Day  — it’s imaginable.

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