Danny Shanahan’s Hudson Valley Interview; An Al Ross Sampler

Danny Shanahan, one of the best there is in the New Yorker cartoonist universe, will sit down for a rare interview and Q&A next week as part of the Hudson Valley Celebrity Series.  Info here (scroll down to the Shanahan section).

 

 

Below: An early classic Shanahan New Yorker drawing (published May 8, 1989), and one of his New Yorker covers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dick Buchanan takes a look at some mid-early work of the late great Al Ross.  You can see them all on Mike Lynch’s website here.

Al Ross’s  entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

 

Al Ross Born Al Roth, Vienna Austria, October 19, 1911. Died, March 23, 2012. One of four Roth brothers, all of them cartoonists ( Ben, Salo, and Irving are the other three). NYer work: 1937- 2002. Collections: Sexcapades – The Love Life of the Modern Homo Sapiens ( Stravon Publishers, 1953), Bums vs billionaires (Dell, 1972)

 

 

 

Fave Photos of the Day: Liza Donnelly Live Drawing at The White House; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Koren; Men, Women & Cartoons

 

Fave Photo of the Day:  CBS News Resident Cartoonist and long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly  is live drawing this morning at The White House. Follow her work on @LizaDonnelly and @CBSThisMorning. Here she is drawing CBS Chief White House Correspondent, Major Garrett out on the White House lawn and the Tweeted drawing.

 

 

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Cartoon Companion returns with a look at the cartoons from The New Yorker‘s issue of April 24th 2017. The CC guys, joined, as usual by a “Mystery Cartoonist” dissect, among others,  cartoons about  bird watching, an avocado funeral, and one very large fish tank. Read it here.

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Here’s another piece about the one and only Edward Koren: “Shaggy Line Story” from The Commons Online.  Read it here.

 

 

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From MTV News,  April 19, 2017, “New Cartoon Tuesdays: How Female Cartoonists Are Changing Mainstream Publications” — read it here

[Note: cartoon Tuesdays (or “look day”)  at The New Yorker switched to Wednesdays in recent times]

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About Thurber

My my my, there certainly are a lot of books about my cartoonist hero,  James Thurber. I thought it would be fun to show the ones in the Spill‘s library, but ran into two more while checking online for any current titles I’d missed ( #11, listed below, is out just this month…are there even more? Let me know). Three of the books below have been indispensable to me: Burton Bernstein’s biography,  Bowden’s bibliography, and Harrison Kinney’s massive biography.  I bought Mr. Bernstein’s biography while in college along with Brendan Gill’s Here At the New Yorker.  Those two books (along with The Thurber Carnival) were my rocket fuel to Manhattan and to the pages of the New Yorker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(pictured at the top of the post: a Thurber eraser)

 

1. James Morsberger.  James Thurber. Twaynes United States Authors Series, 1964.

2. Edwin T. Bowden.  James Thurber: A Bibliography. Ohio State University Press,  1968.

3. Richard C. Tobias. The Art of James Thurber. Ohio University Press, 1969.

4. Charles S. Holmes.  The Clocks of Columbus. Athenium, 1972.

5. Burton Bernstein. Thurber.  Dodd, Mead, 1975.

6. Robert Emmet Long.  James Thurber.  Continuum, 1988.

7. Thomas Fensch (Ed.). Conversations With James Thurber. University Press of Mississippi, 1989.

8. Neil A. Grauer.  Remember Laughter: A Life of James Thurber. University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

9. Harrison Kinney.  James Thurber: His Life and Times. Henry Holt, 1995.

10. Alan Vanneman.  James Thurber: A Readers Guide. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2015.

11. Bob Hunter.  Thurberville. Trillium, 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roz Chast’s West Coast Exhibit; Edward Koren on His Life & Work

 

 

Roz Chast‘s Retrospective Exhibit, Cartoon Memoirs, which opened at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts then traveled to The Museum of The City of New York, has landed in San Francisco at the Contemporary Jewish Museum.  Read all about it here. 

(Opens April 27th, and runs through September 3, 2017)

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Edward Koren, who is fast approaching his 55th year of contributing to The New Yorker (his first drawing appeared in the issue of May 26, 1962) will talk about his life & work at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center on April 20th. Details here.

Ed Steed’s Father John Misty Art; A Video Review of Francoise Mouly’s “Blown Covers”

 

From Arms Around the Stereo, April 16, 2017, “On Father John Misty and Ed Steed” (pictured here)this piece about Mr. Steed’s album cover art for Pure Comedy (Rolling Stone magazine recently gave the album a four star review). __________________________________________________________________________

From the Australian Cartoon Museum, April 17, 2017, this 40 minute video book review of Francoise Mouly’s  Blown Covers (published in 2012).   It’s oddly compelling listening to these two fellows talk about the art and and artists, about the book itself (its design, the way the content is presented, etc.).  See it here.

Personal Archive: A Rejected Easter Cover; John Drummond, Cartoonist & Member of Ink Spill’s One Club Has Died; An Arno Mystery Solved

I’ve submitted a lot of cover ideas to The New Yorker over the years. Two were bought, but never ran, and two others were bought as cartoons (one ran, the other is still in the magazine’s archives). This Easter-themed submission, obviously done when I was in a Charles Addams mood,  never got a nibble from the editors.  But I’ve always liked it enough to drag it out this time of year.  It dates from the late 1980s — either the Robert Gottlieb era, or possibly the very end of the William Shawn era.  

 

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D.D. Degg has informed Ink Spill that  John Drummond, passed away on April 11 at age 90.  Mr. Drummond, whose one appearance in The New Yorker qualified him as a One Club* member worked for a number of national magazines.  His one New Yorker drawing, shown here, appeared October 2, 1965.

Read his obit here.

A short profile here.

 

*Ink Spill‘s One Club is limited to cartoonists who were published just once in The New Yorker.  Their One Club status is noted on the members “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry by the red top-hatted fellow   Members qualify only after thirty years have passed since their one and only appearance.

(My thanks to Mr. Degg for the links to Mr. Drummond’s obit and profile. More links courtesy of Mr. Degg here. )

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Just a few days ago, we wondered where this Peter Arno drawing appeared. Attempted Bloggery now has the answer. Find it here.

 

 

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Cartoonist Photos via Mike Lynch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a fun way to end the week: browsing through all 14 of the Cartoonist Photo links on  Mike Lynch’s blog.  Part 14 is up today, with links to the other 13 parts following the post. There are a small number of New Yorker cartoonists throughout — here are just three:  left to right: William Steig, Sid Harris, and Steinberg.

Where Was This Arno?; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Roz Chast’s Poster; Eckstein’s Upgraded Airline Passenger; Ross Bateup Added to the A-Z

Where did this Peter Arno drawing appear? Attempted Bloggery is looking for the answer. If it was in The New Yorker, it’s somehow eluded  the magazine’s  record-keepers.  Read more here.

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Cartoon Companion is back with a close and entertaining look at the cartoons appearing in the April 17, 2017 New Yorker. This issue contains, among others, two costumed characters, some apartment-hunting ants, a fashion savvy caveman, some duck-hunters, a couple of booze-themed drawings, and a Victorian selfie stick.  Read all about them here.

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Roz Chast is the poster gal for The 2017 National Book Festival. Read about it here. 

(My thanks to Mike Rhode for bringing this to my attention).

 

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From The National Lampoon, here’s a timely cartoon by that funny guy (and Snowman Expert)  Bob Eckstein.

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While idly paging through the August 28th  1971 issue of The New Yorker I came across a cartoonist I somehow missed when compiling the Spill‘s” New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”: Ross Bateup.  Mr. Bateup’s work appeared four times: August 8, 1971; October 16, 1971; November 4, 1972; May 19, 1973. Here’s a link to  his biography.

Here’s his cartoon from the May 19, 1973 issue: