Shannon Wheeler’s Closet Discovery

 

Here’s the third in Ink Spill‘s series of New Yorker cartoonists talking about an important cartoon connection in their lives.   The earlier posts: Felipe Galindo on Steinberg , and Tom Cheney on Charles Rodrigues.

 

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Shannon Wheeler, a New Yorker contributor since 2009 (his first cartoon for the magazine appears above), as well as the creator of the series,Too Much Coffee Man, for which he won an Eisner Award, talks about discovering the work of Gahan Wilson. Shannon was four at the time:

 

Before I could read, in the closet of the guest room, at my grandmother’s lake house, I found a stack of Playboy magazines. I remember starting at the top of the stack and going through every issue. The words were unintelligible, the pictures were incomprehensible, but the cartoons were… interesting. Most of the cartoons didn’t make sense but every now and again I’d hit one that was fascinating. There were monsters, bulbous heads, tentacles, aliens…those were the Gahan Wilson cartoons. I started looking for that style because they had a story to them that didn’t need words. It gave me a thrill because I couldn’t read the words but I was reading the images. My grandmother found me in a pile of Playboys and she was furious. She punished me even though I had no idea what I’d done wrong. To this day I read Gahan Wilson cartoons with a resonant thrill of doing something I shouldn’t be doing – I can’t help but think it also started me on a path of wanting to draw cartoons myself. Anything that could fire up my calm grandmother must have some inherent power and I wanted part of it.

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Left: Wheeler just a couple of years before he began heading down the pathway to Cartoonville.

Felipe Galindo (feggo) Exhibit; Liza Donnelly and the Historic Ignatz Awardss

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All the information you need about Felipe Galindo’s exhibit is above!  Go!

Link here to Mr. Galindo’s website.

 

and…

 

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From Michael Cavna’s Washington Post blog, Comic Riffs, September 16, 2013, “Liza Donnelly’s Ignatz Awards make some history ‘to celebrate’ women cartoonists”

 

and in further Donnelly news:

portrait_modanTomorrow evening Ms. Donnelly interviews Rutu Modan at The Society of Illustrators.  Link here to their  website for all the details.

 

Brooklyn Book Festival features New Yorker Contributors Past & Present

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This Monday, the 16th of September, the Brooklyn Book Festival begins with its Bookend events.  Names familiar from the New Yorker’s past, and names familiar from its present take part in (or are the subjects of) various events throughout the week. Below are just some of the events featuring New Yorker folk.  Please consult the Festivals website for all the details.

Monday, the 16th:

Lorin Stein and Chip McGrath on John O’Hara.  Paris Review editor Lorin Stein and The New York Times writer-at-large Chip McGrath discuss John O’Hara, who’s had more stories published in The New Yorker than anyone in the history of the magazine. Moderated by Steven Goldleaf.  Presented by powerHouse Arena  + Penguin Classics.

On Wednesday, September 18th:

Book Launch: Oil & Honey by Bill McKibben. In this personal account of climate activism, the bestselling author and environmentalist leads a protest against the building of the Keystone XL pipeline and helps raise hives with a Vermont beekeeper.

 

Also on Wednesday:

Book Launch: Art Spiegelman presents Co-Mix. Greenlight hosts Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist, Art Spiegelman, for the bookstore launch of his new book Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps.  Spiegelman presents a talk and slideshow about his work and signs copies of CoMix for fans.


Thursday, Sept. 19th:

TOON Books All-Ages Comics Extravaganza. Join us to celebrate the US debut by Argentine comics star Liniers who will present The Big Wet Balloon and paint live on stage, with musical accompaniment by New Yorker artist Barry Blitt and his band, the Half Tones; AND featuring the following artists, on hand to sign their work: Liniers (The Big Wet Balloon), Françoise Mouly (In Love With Art by Jeet Heer), Art Spiegelman (Co-Mix), Jeff Smith (RASL), R. Kikuo Johnson (The Shark King), Frank Viva (A Trip to the Bottom of the World), Rutu Modan (Maya Makes a Mess), Dean Haspiel (Mo and Jo), Trade Loeffler (Zig and Wikki), and Gary Panter (RAW).  This all-ages event will bring together art and book lovers, comics fans, and the Hispanic community.

Saturday, September 21st:

Charlotte’s Web. To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the beloved animated film adaptation of Charlotte’s Web, BAMcinematek will present simultaneous family matinee screenings of the 1973 (animated) and 2006 (live action) adaptations.

Location: Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Ave (btw. Ashland and St. Felix)

Sunday, September 22nd:

The Faces of Brooklyn: New York’s coolest borough is home to hipsters, people who dislike hipsters and literary stars—among them, Brooklyn enthusiasts Pete Hamill (The Christmas Kid), Adelle Waldman (The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.) and Adrian Tomine (New York Drawings). These powerhouses plant uniquely different characters in a nostalgic Brooklyn, a contemporary Brooklyn and a colorful Brooklyn that jumps off the page. Moderated by Penina Roth (Franklin Park Reading Series).

Also on Sunday:

Art Spiegelman and Jules Feiffer in Conversation: Pulitzer-Prize winning graphic novelist Art Spiegelman‘s newest release, Co-Mix, is a career retrospective that covers his work from Raw to Maus to the New Yorker (and Garbage Pail Kids in between). Joined by Jules Feiffer (Out of Line: The Art of Jules Feiffer), also a Pulitzer winner, they debate the purpose and impact of comics art, its history and development, and their visions of its future. Featuring screen projection.

Arts and Politics in Fiction: Art has always been a tool for political and social change. In these novels, it comes in the form of protest-pop songs, motorcycle photography and high-end fashion. Alex Gilvarry (From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant), Rachel Kushner (The Flamethrowers) and Nicholson Baker (Traveling Sprinkler) shed new light on the timeless relationship between art and politics. Moderated by Joel Whitney.

Mundane/Profane/Profound: What We Draw About When We Draw Comics. Gag cartoonists and graphic novelists talk about the weird, wonderful, and sometimes shocking choices they make in their craft. Ben Katchor (Hand-Drying in America) offers urban fables where daily details lead to socio/political revelations. Lisa Hanawalt‘s sexy/snarky one-pagers in My Dirty Dumb Eyes hinge on the vulnerability of showing it all. Miriam Katin‘s thoughtful, witty memoir Letting it Go explores profound loss and forgiveness in the context of teeth whitening and stomach troubles. Ulli Lust‘s punk travelogue This is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life lays bare body and soul. Moderated by Anne Ishii, translator, The Passion of Gengoroh Tagame. Featuring screen projection.  Special thanks to Goethe-Institut New York.

Art on the Mind: Comics and Education. Françoise Mouly (Toon Books) in conversation with National Book Award finalist Gene Yang (Boxers & Saints), R. Kikuo Johnson (The Shark King) and Professor Barbara Tversky of Teachers College. In this era of high-stakes testing, comics aren’t just a refreshing change of pace for students-they take on deep subjects and teach multimodal literacy, offering educators, librarians, and parents a new way to approach learning. Featuring screen projection.

Publish and Perish? E-books are killing publishing! The corporations are killing publishing! Self-publishing is killing publishing! While headlines continually bemoan the end of the literary world as we know it, others argue that the reports of publishing’s demise have been greatly exaggerated.  Janet Groth (The Receptionist) and Boris Kachka (Hothouse) take a look inside two of our most storied institutions—The New Yorker and Farrar, Straus and Giroux—and consider the past while taking the pulse of the literary world today.

 

 


 

Small Press Expo (SPX 2013) this weekend

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Happening this very moment: The Small Press Expo 2013 (the poster is by by New Yorker contributor, Seth). Below, a couple of pieces about it:

From The Washington Post’s “Comic Riffs” column by Michael Cavna, September 14, 2013,   SPX 2013: From Carre to DeForge: Here they are, your Ignatz Award nominees

From Washington City Paper, September 14, 2013,  “Small Press Expo at Bethesda North Marriott”

New Trailer & The Poster for Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird

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We recently told you that Steven-Charles Jaffee’s documentary “Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird” will be shown in NYC this October — and now there’s a new trailer

 

The nearly two minute clip includes appearances by the one and only Hugh Hefner as well as The New Yorker’s current editor, David Remnick.

And now there’s a poster as well (above). Very exciting stuff!

Link to the film’s website here.

Link to some of Gahan Wilson’s work for The New Yorker here.