Book of Interest: The Realist Cartoons; Feiffer at 86; Mick Stevens Talks Batch

Posted on 22nd June 2015 in News

RealistIt’s going to be awhile before this appears in bookstores (April of 2016) but the wait will be worth it.  Here’s a description  from the publisher (Fantagraphics):

The Realist was a legendary satirical periodical that ran from 1958 to 2001 and published some of the most incendiary cartoons that ever appeared in an American magazine. The Realist Cartoons collects, for the first time, the best, the wittiest, and the most provocative drawings that appeared in its pages, including work by R. Crumb, Art Spiegelman, S. Clay Wilson, Jay Lynch, Trina Robbins, Mort Gerberg, Jay Kinney, Richard Guindon, Nicole Hollander, Skip Williamson, and many others.

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MN-AJ408_FEIFFE_J_20150615154339 Here’s a really nice interview with Jules Feiffer from The Wall Street Journal (by way of Bado’s blog).

 

 

 

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The BatchIf you happen to be in the vicinity of St. Augustine, Florida on June 30th, you’re in luck, because Mick Stevens,  one of the funniest New Yorker cartoonists on the planet will be showing his work and speaking about “The Batch” [a collective term for the drawings a cartoonist submits weekly to the magazine. Link here to see my complete New Yorker cartoonists glossary]

Mick posted the following on Face Book this morning:

I’ll be speaking briefly (20 Slides, 20 seconds per slide) at Pecha Kucha nite here in St. Aug. on June 30. Details.

Tom Toro Returns as The New Yorker’s Daily Cartoonist; Looking at a 90 Year Old Issue of The New Yorker

Posted on 20th June 2015 in News

tom-final-1657-1e23aac5773a5b446c00fc32d090c99e4a131217-s300-c85Tom Toro (left) has taken The New Yorker Daily Cartoonist baton from Christopher Weyant.  Mr.Toro previously did the Daily in early 2014.

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hoh1A couple of days ago, A Case For Pencils was mentioned in this space as a new favorite site…today, another favorite,  Attempted Bloggery brings to our attention the  June 20th 1925 New Yorker (a copy recently sold at auction for  $1,330.00).

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons return to Late Night with Seth Meyers

Posted on 11th June 2015 in News

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“Live” New Yorker cartoons returned to NBC’s  “Late Night with Seth Meyers” last night.   This third installment in the series can be seen here.  Seth Meyers is joined by Jerry Seinfeld and The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick, who provides commentary.  Cartoons by Bruce Eric Kaplan, Alex Gregory, Mark Thompson, Tom Cheney, and Charlie Hankin are featured.

Cartoonists Exhibit Work North & West of New York City

Posted on 10th June 2015 in News

KorenThe 50 year (and counting!) career of the great Edward Koren is being celebrated at the Saginaw Art Museum.  All the info here.

Edward Koren’s website

 

 

 

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During the heart of the summer, Carolita Johnson and Michael Crawford will exhibit their work in Kingston, NY. All the info here.

 

 

 

 

Carolita Johnson’s website

Michael Crawford’s website

 

 

Eckstein’s Obscura Day; Finck’s Supportive Paintings

Posted on 2nd June 2015 in News

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Bob Eckstein’s graphic coverage of  Obscura Day here on The New Yorker‘s website.

 

 

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All the Paintings

 

And check out Liana Finck’s “All the Paintings Here Agree: A Comic”  here on the Toast

The Washington Post’s Michael Cavna on the National Cartoonists Society Awards

Posted on 24th May 2015 in News

 

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Here’s Michael Cavna of The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs with as good a wrap-up of last nights NCS Awards as you’ll find.

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Ink Spill congratulates all the winners, with an extra thumbs up to New Yorker colleagues, Roz Chast & Liza Donnelly.

Andy Friedman’s Baseball Cards; Chast Exhibit at The Norman Rockwell Museum; Books of Interest: Byrnes, Haefeli

Posted on 19th May 2015 in News

 

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Here, by way of newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, is a terrific piece, with slideshow, by Andy Friedman.   Mr. Friedman has worn a number of hats outside of the magazine as well as within the magazine, including cartoon assistant to Bob Mankoff, illustrator, and cartoonist (often under the name, Larry Hat).

Link here to Mr. Friedman’s website

 

 

 

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This June, The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts will present “Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs”all the info here.

 

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Pat Byrnes 2005 collection, What Would Satan Do?: Cartoons about right, wrong, and very, very wrong is now an e-book, with, as advertised on the cover, “10% More Evil” — available here as well as elsewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

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William Haefeli illustrates Dan Ariely’s Irrationally Yours: On Missing Socks, Pickup Lines, and Other Existential Puzzles. In bookstores today!

New Yorker Cartoonist Joe Dator Tells Us About “The Cartoons on Peggy Olson’s Wall”

Posted on 15th May 2015 in News

 

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On this momentous Mad Men weekend, it gives me great pleasure to post an Ink Spill exclusive from my New Yorker colleague, Joe Dator.  I can’t think of a better cartoon-related way to salute this classic series. My thanks to Joe for bringing this terrific piece to the Spill. [click on the cartoons to enlarge them ]

  And now, without further ado…

 

 

 

 

“The Cartoons on Peggy Olson’s Wall”

 

Is there a clever nickname for Mad Men fans? “Maddies” doesn’t seem right, and “Mennies” is even worse (How about “Trekkies”? The Star Trek people aren’t using it anymore. I say we make them an offer). Whatever the word for it is, I am one. I’m completely enthralled by the writing, the acting and the incredible attention to period detail. For me, these characters seem absolutely real, and I’ve met some future older version of just about all of them.

 

One of those is copy chief Peggy Olson, played by Elisabeth Moss. In the fifth season episode “Dark Shadows”, which takes place in 1966, Peggy opens a pitch meeting for a soft drink with “Everyone loves the cartoons in The New Yorker, and I thought we could do that kind with the guy crawling across the Sahara dying of thirst”. Her idea doesn’t fit the campaign, but it fits her character. Peggy’s come a long way (vintage advertising reference!) since starting at Sterling Cooper, working her way up to copywriter when few women were anything other than secretaries. She’s an upward striver who would have reveled in her new found metropolitan lifestyle (although as a young professional she might not have been the ideal demographic for The New Yorker at that time- its ads from those days seemed to mostly target the kind of people who buy furs and travel to India for the food).

 

Three fictional years later, Peggy has a bit more office real estate and she decorates it partly with cartoons. In the seventh season episodes “Severance” and “New Business” there are four New Yorker cartoons visible on the wall (I couldn’t identify the other four- it’s likely they were culled from one of the other magazines that ran cartoons back then, of which there were still many).

 

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True to the production’s meticulous attention to detail, all of them were published prior to those episodes April 1970 setting. Let’s take a closer look.

 

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First up is this William Steig cartoon from March 22nd, 1969. It’s funny, but why would Peggy want to clip it out and save it? I think it would have struck a nerve with any woman of that era. Despite revisionist nostalgia for the 60s as a time for acceptance of curvier figures, the reality is that weight-loss, or “reducing” products were sold exclusively and aggressively to women back then. Peggy wrote copy for a few of those, like “Patio”, a kind of proto Diet Pepsi, and “The Electrosizer”, a baffling vibrating harness contraption (which proved to have benefits for women that were very far away from weight loss).

 

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Of course, I think this cartoon may have resonated with Peggy for a different reason. Is that hen just stout or is she pregnant? Peggy spent the better part of Season 1 carrying Pete Campbell’s baby, unaware or more likely in willful denial of her condition and her growing shape. Her boss Don Draper chillingly says to her, after she’s given the child up for adoption, that “This never happened.” Don is a shape-shifter, and this cartoon may be a reminder to Peggy of how much she is like her mentor after all.

 

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At the time this Dana Fradon cartoon was published, on February 22nd, 1969, the Cold War was still in full swing, and the Paris Peace Talks were entering their second year. It’s safe to say the public was losing some confidence in its leaders’ and diplomats’ ability to talk through their problems. But I’d like to think Peggy taped this one up because it reminded her of all the time she spent in places where “the ladies have to sit and listen to the men talk”. She’s heard a lot of important men saying a lot of important things, and she knows better than anyone else how much of it is just pure gobbledegook.

 

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This Warren Miller cartoon, from February 15th, 1969, in which animals have occupied a zoo administrator’s office, is clearly a reference to student protests at universities in 1968 and 69. It’s a snapshot of the power struggle that was going on between the establishment and the counter culture at that time. Peggy’s a part of that menagerie that has wrestled control of the institution away from the stuffy pipe-smokers that run it, although I imagine she feels more like the zoo director- in constant danger of being pushed out of her hard-won position by the animals of the firm. That lion looks a lot like Don, the giraffe like the statuesque Joan and the ostrich could easily be mistaken for Roger Sterling (I don’t see a duck in there, but if there was one I guess it would be… Duck?).

 

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Another Dana Fradon cartoon, from March 22nd 1969. On numerous occasions throughout the series Peggy expressed a desire to go to Paris but couldn’t get there. Another time she accepted a job at a rival firm that she thought would take her to new places (Paris included) and within months was back working for Don due to an impromptu merger. That could be what she sees in this cartoon, or maybe, as we saw from her measured response to the complete dissolution of the firm in Season 7, she just has the right attitude about her climb up the corporate ladder- she takes it all in stride because she knows all roads really lead to nowhere, anyway.

 

I imagine Peggy Olson today, still healthy in her mid-70s, owner of numerous cats in a cavernous rent-controlled apartment on Columbus Avenue. She’s still witty and caustic, yet still sweet and filled with wonder. She still subscribes to The New Yorker, but I don’t think she’s one of those people who only reads it for the cartoons. She likes the ads, too.

(Thanks to Leigh Montville for help with research)

 

Credits, in order of appearance:

Cartoon by William Steig / The New Yorker Collection / www.cartoonbank.com

Cartoon by Dana Fradon / The New Yorker Collection / www.cartoonbank.com

Cartoon by Warren Miller / The New Yorker Collection / www.cartoonbank.com

Cartoon by Dana Fradon / The New Yorker Collection /www.cartoonbank.com

 

 

 

Raconteur #7 with Anderson, Klossner, Lynch, Maslin, and Piccolo

Posted on 14th May 2015 in News

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Raconteur #7 is now available. And what is Raconteur you might ask? From the jacket:

Raconteur is a collection of true stories written and illustrated by cartoonists who usually specialize in other formats.

This issue features Mark Anderson, John Klossner, Mike Lynch, Rina Piccolo, and yours truly.

Having been a fan of the series from its beginning, I was thrilled when invited to participate in this number. My thanks to Mike Lynch and his fellow Raconteurs for including me.

Link here for more information, and how to order.

Karasik Reviews Kurtzman Bio; Audio: Matt Diffee

Posted on 11th May 2015 in News

Kurtzman bioHere’s Paul Karasik’s graphic review of the new Harvey Kurtzman biographyKurtzman

 

 

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Md and here’s Matt Diffee on the weekend edition of NPR, speaking about his brand new book, Hand Drawn Jokes For Smart Attractive People