Thurber Settled In at One World Trade Center

Posted on 3rd February 2015 in News

Thurber @ One World Trade CenterWhen you move, it’s always reassuring unboxing something you love from the old place and setting it down in the new place.  In 1991 when The New Yorker left its long time offices at 25 West 43rd Street, the magazine brought along a number of office wall drawings by James Thurber. The drawings were carefully extricated from 25 West 43rd Street and eventually installed across the street at 20 West 43rd Street. These very same drawings were moved again when the magazine moved west to 4 Times Square in 1999.

In a tradition at The New Yorker that goes back to the magazine’s founding in 1925, cartoonists come in on Tuesdays to show their latest efforts to the cartoon editor. Greeting them this Tuesday — their first Tuesday at the new offices at One World Trade Center — were Thurber’s drawings, in a new neighborhood, in a new building, at a higher elevation, and installed on a new wall, but still, as Brendan Gill might’ve said, here at The New Yorker.

 

[photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly]

Eustace Tilley Bids Adieu, Again

Posted on 26th January 2015 in News

Eustace 2Eustace Tilley (via Bruce McCall) bids adieu to Times Square on the cover of this week’s New Yorker.  The magazine begins work in its new headquarters at 1 World Trade this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s top-hatted mascot bid goodbye once before, back in August of 1937, when Otto Soglow gave us Tilley, not in a Cadillac, but in the back of a  Victoria, and embarking from The Plaza Hotel, not Times Square.   Back then,  Tilley was substituting for E.B. White, who had decided on taking a leave of absence from New York & The New Yorker.  The drawing appeared at the bottom of White’s farewell Talk of The Town piece.  A tearful Thurber dog follows close by the rear wheel. Eustace tips his hat to two waving women in black, holding muffs: Peter Arno’s Whoops Sisters.

 

White's goodbye

New Yorker Cartoonists Respond

Posted on 15th January 2015 in News

LDBob Mankoff’s blog this week, “Pour Charlie”  features a number of New Yorker cartoonists cartoon responses to last week’s events in Paris.

Home is Where the Top Hat Is: The New Yorker Moves

Posted on 13th January 2015 in News

For nearly ninety years, The New Yorker magazine has called mid-town Manhattan home, until this month, when it moves south on the island of Manhattan to 1 World Trade Center. Below is a handy map showing when & where the magazine has been since 1925.

NYer moves (a)

 

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New Yorker Cartoon Editor Responds to Charlie Hebdo Attack

Posted on 8th January 2015 in News

BobLinks below to televised appearances by The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff in response to the Charlie Hebdo attack:

The Wall Street Journal’s  The News Hub.

The CBS Evening News

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And from The UK’s Independent: cartoons by cartoonists from around the world  responding to the attack

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The New York Times profiles the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists who lost their lives

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From MSNBC’s Ronan Farrow Daily, Jan 8, 2015, here’s a short video of Michael Shaw’s appearance.

 

Auction of Interest: Swann Offers Numerous New Yorker Cartoons; Covers Calendar Noted; Video: Mankoff on Science of Humor

Posted on 2nd January 2015 in News

SwannSwann’s upcoming auction on January 22nd is chock full of New Yorker cartoons, with work by a number of the magazine’s giants.

Cartoons on the block by Steinberg, Mischa Richter, Barbara Shermund, William Steig, Richard Taylor, Edward Sorel, Victoria Roberts, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson, Rea Irvin, and Peter Arno.

Below: a beautiful early Steig included in the auction.

steig

Link here to see all the work and for all the auction info.

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Covers Cal

Ordinarily, New Yorker cartoon calendars, diaries, and the like aren’t listed here, but this sounds like it’s not your ordinary calendar, so I’m making an exception.

Here’s an excerpt from the publisher’s blurb for The New Yorker 365 Days of Covers Page-A-Day Gallery Calendar 2016:

“…this calendar features hundreds of the very best examples, all beautifully reproduced in full color. Here are iconic covers from Jean-Jacques Sempé, George Booth, Maira Kalman, Arthur Getz, Roz Chast, and the other illustrators whose work has helped shape The New Yorker’s inimitable style. Unprecedented quality with its exceptional art, coated paper, and exacting standards of color printing, this calendar is a gallery for your desk.”

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Bob

 

From Business Insider, December 31, 2014, this short video featuring The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff: “Scientists Discovered What Makes Something Funny”

 

A Round-Up of Books to be Released in 2015 by New Yorker Cartoonists

Posted on 22nd December 2014 in News

2015 looks to be an exciting year for new books from New Yorker cartoonists.  Here’s a sampling:

 

 

Gahan : Out Theregahanwilson

 

A collection by the one-and-only Gahan Wilson, Out There (Fantagraphics, July 3, 2015).  As anyone who visits this site knows, Mr. Wilson was recently the subject of a documentary film by Steven-Charles Jaffe, Born Dead, Still Weird

 

 

6fc3355abcFrom Marisa Acocella Marchetto, the author of the hugely popular Cancer Vixen, Ann Tenna (Knopf, September 1, 2015). Sorry, no cover image yet.

A review provided by the publisher:

“I am in awe: this is the work of a master craftsman at the top of her game. Ann Tenna is a great work of art, its storytelling fabulous and fresh. Marisa Acocella Marchetto defines our moment with social commentary that’s sharp, witty, and wise. Here is a universe of characters that will amaze and enchant you—a winning narrative that is timely, bold, and brilliant. Brava Marisa!” —Adriana Trigiani, author of Big Stone Gap and The Shoemaker’s Wife

 

Litera.RozChastRoz:clockFrom Roz Chast, author of the acclaimed memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant, Around the Clock! (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, January 13, 2015).

A review provided by the publisher:
“New Yorker cartoonist Chast presents a zany, hour-by-hour look at the activities of 23 different kids…the off-the-wall mayhem of Chast’s illustrations is what makes this quirky offering stand out…good, ridiculous fun, and future fans of alternative comic artists will eat this one right up.” (School Library Journal, January 2015)

 

 

 

DONNELLY_20Photo300dpiDonnelly:rainbow

 

 

 

 

 

From Liza Donnelly, author of Women on Men, a 2014 Thurber Prize finalist, The End of the Rainbow (Holiday House (January 1, 2015).

 

kaplan__121214194742Screen shot 2014-08-31 at 4.50.41 PMFrom Bruce Eric Kaplan, a memoir, I Was a Child (Blue Rider Press, April 14, 2015).

A review provided by the publisher:

“In his poetically illustrated memoir, Bruce Eric Kaplan manages to capture all that is beautiful, hilarious and painful about growing up human. He will make you laugh with recognition, cry with nostalgia and longing, and somehow wish you were growing up bored in New Jersey.”
—Lena Dunham

 

 

Harold Ross’s Caption Contest

Posted on 18th December 2014 in News

Judge cover 7:19:24

 

 

Less than a year before Harold Ross published the very first issue of his brainchild, The New Yorker, he briefly edited a well-established humor magazine, Judge.  I recently bought a copy of the Ross period Judge to see what I could see (it’s the issue of July 19, 1924).

it was odd, but of course not unexpected,  to see in tiny type across the bottom of the inside cover,  “Harold W. Ross, Vice-Pres.” Unexpected was the cartoon caption contest that filled the rest of the page,  “Judge’s Fifty-Fifty Contest No. 59.”

Judge contest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “fifty-fifty” refers to the cartoon’s caption having two parts, with two individuals speaking. The first part of the caption is given — it’s up to the reader to provide the second part.  New Yorker cartoon aficionados might recall that two part captions (sometimes referred to as “he-she”) were the go-to single panel cartoon format in the major humor publications of the day. That isn’t to say they were the only format.  Captionless cartoons appeared as did New Yorker style single captions. As Judge’s caption contest reflects the format of its day, using the he-she caption,  the current New Yorker caption contest reflects its time, asking of the readership to supply a single caption, with no lead in line.

Flipping further through this issue of Judge I came upon a good number of future New Yorker cartoonists: Milt Gross, Gardner Rea, Paul Reilly, Frank Hanley, Tousey,  Walter J. Enright, Crawford Young, John Held, Jr., and Alfred Leete.  Mr Leete and Mr. Rea would appear in the inaugural issue of the New Yorker in February of 1925. Paul Reilly would contribute twice to the New Yorker in 1925. Tousey just once in November of 1926. Mr. Enright just once in 1927. Mr. Gross just once in 1929. Mr. Hanley contributed six cartoons in the New Yorker’s first year, but none thereafter. Only Mr. Rea would go on to have a long career at The New Yorker (his last contribution appeared in 1965). Below is his “he-she” drawing from this issue of Judge (actually, it’s really she-he as the “Grim Lady” speaks first).

Gardner Rea 1924_Judge

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s entirely clear, after looking through Judge a time or three that Ross sponged-up the best of the publication (as he did with other humor magazines, including Punch and Life) imagining what kind of magazine he wanted, and what kind he didn’t want.

Fave New Yorker Cartoonists Photos of the Day

Posted on 16th December 2014 in News

Holiday 12:15:14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two photos, taken December 15, 2014 in lower Manhattan.

Above, left to right: Felipe Galindo (Feggo), P.C. Vey, David Borchart, Sam Gross, Colin Stokes (writer & assistant to the New Yorker’s cartoon editor), Liza Donnelly and Joe Dator (who is currently the magazine’s Daily Cartoonist).

Below: Liza Donnelly, Liana Finck, and Barbara Smaller

 

D, F, & Smaller 12:15:14

 

 

 

 

 

 

(photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly)

Favorite Photo of the Day

Posted on 12th December 2014 in News

SVA:Eckstein

 

 

 

Richard Gehr (pictured on the extreme left), author of the recently published book of New Yorker cartoonist interviews, I Only Read It For the Cartoons, hosted a panel discussion last night at the School of Visual Arts. Panelists (left to right): Sam Gross (filling in for Edward Koren, snowed-in up in Vermont), Victoria Roberts, Lee Lorenz, and Arnie Levin (also filling in). (photo for Ink Spill courtesy of Bob Eckstein).

cartoonscover