Lee Lorenz’s 1993 Donald Cartoon Most-liked on New Yorker’s New Cartoon Instagram Account; Sara Lautman Pencilled

Posted on 3rd August 2016 in News

NewYorkerDonaldDuckA New Yorker drawing from 1993 by the magazine’s former Art Editor/Cartoon Editor, Lee Lorenz has, so far,  gathered the most likes on the magazine’s brand spanking new Instagram account. Read more here on Adweek.com”s FishbowlNY.

Below: Mr. Lorenz’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry.

 

Lee Lorenz ( Pictured above. Photograph taken 1995 by Liza Donnelly) *Born 1932, Hackensack, NJ. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). NYer work: 1958 – .

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Sara Lautman, a new addition to The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists,   is next up on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils. See her entry here.

 

 

 

Ink Spill’s 9th Anniversary

Posted on 1st August 2016 in News

Ink Spill's 9

This summer marks the ninth anniversary of Ink Spill. The Spill began back in the summer of 2007 out of a desire to collect and share information about my New Yorker cartoonist colleagues, past and present. It’s been beyond rewarding to see the site grow in viewership, with over nineteen million hits recorded in these past nine years. This happily reflects the interest out there in what we cartoonists have done, are doing, and will do.

As I have in the past on these anniversary posts, I thank my extended New Yorker family for their support and contributions, and I thank all of you out there for dropping by to see what’s up, and for your suggestions, contributions and comments. Your interest makes this all worthwhile.

Lifting a line from E.B. White’s Comment on The New Yorker’s ninth anniversary in 1934: “It is fine to be nine.”

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Liza Donnelly: Live-Drawing the Dems Historic Convention; E. Simms Campbell Spotlighted

Posted on 28th July 2016 in News

 

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From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, July 29, 2016 “Live-Drawing Hillary’s Historic Convention” — Liza Donnelly’s graphic account of her four days at the Democratic Convention.

As mentioned earlier this week on the Spill, Ms. Donnelly  spent the week embedded with CBS News in Philadelphia, drawing on-set, and in and around the convention hall. You can see some of her work here and a short video here.  Also follow Ms. Donnelly on Twitter @lizadonnelly for her latest drawings.

Below: Ms. Donnelly, second from left, with the CBS This Morning news team, Norah O’ Donnell, Charlie Rose and Gayle King,  in Philadelphia, July 28 2016.

L at DNC w: CBS This Morning News team July 28 2016

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From 1,001 Chicago Afternoons, July 27, 2016, “Cuties and The Englewood Cartoonist” this short piece on E. Simms Campbell.  Here’s  Mr. Cambell’s entry on Ink Spill’s A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell  (photo above)  Born, 1906. Died, 1971.  NYer work: 1932 -1942. Key  collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist; More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

For more information, go here to Chris Wheeler’s fabulous website to see Mr. Campbell’s cartoon collections.

 

Fifty Years Ago this week in The New Yorker…the Cartoons & Cartoonists

Posted on 26th July 2016 in News

From time-to-time Ink Spill looks way way back at The New Yorker’s cartoon universe. Today, we’ll drop in on the issue dated fifty years ago, July 30, 1966 and take a brief look around at the cartoons and cartoonists within. In 1966, William Shawn was in his 14th year as editor of The New Yorker; the Art Editor, James Geraghty, was in his 27th year (back then the Art Editor was responsible for all aspects of the magazine’s art: the spot drawings, the covers and the cartoons).

 

Reilly 1st cover 

 

 

The cover — a beauty — was by Donald Reilly. It was the first of Mr. Reilly’s sixteen covers for the magazine (his last, Feb 10, 1992). Though sixteen covers is impressive, even more impressive are the thousand-plus cartoons he contributed during his time at the magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s his Ink Spill “A-Z” entry:

DR A-Z


 

The Table of Contents back then looked like this (readers were left on their own to identify the cartoonists and the contributors to the Talk of The Town):

TOC Aug 1, '66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cartoonists in the issue: Whitney Darrow, Jr., William Steig, Saul Steinberg, Joseph Mirachi, James Stevenson, Donald Reilly, Charles Saxon, Frank Modell, Alan Dunn, Robert Day, Warren Miller, Stan Hunt, and Mischa Richter

 

A deep, albeit all-male, bench of talent.  This New Yorker Cartoonists Hall of Fame line-up doesn’t even include a number of the other regular contributors of the time including Peter Arno, Charles Addams, Syd Hoff, Dana Fradon, Al Ross, Barney Tobey, Robert Weber, Edward Koren, Lee Lorenz, and many more (the work of the great George Price, that master of the quirky split-line is represented in a ¾ page drawing for Iberia Airlines).

 

The newest addition to The New Yorker’s stable in this issue was Warren Miller, whose first cartoon appeared in the magazine in 1959. The most senior cartoonist was the aforementioned Mr. Dunn. His work first appeared in The New Yorker in 1926.

 

Of particular note is the six page spread “Come to Britain” by Charles Saxon. We don’t see spreads like this in the magazine anymore – at least on the somewhat regular basis they once appeared. Generally speaking – or even specifically speaking — cartoon spreads are history (A Roz Chast spread in 2014 comes to mind, but it was a bird of a different feather as it was an excerpt from her forthcoming book and not a spread created for the magazine).

 

What to make of The New Yorker’s cartoon culture fifty years ago: the magazine was seven to eight years away from the end of Geraghty’s long run as art editor (Lee Lorenz was his successor). Although the Geraghty era is sometimes referred to as the Golden Age of New Yorker cartooning – it’s tough to argue it wasn’t –I believe the Golden Age extended beyond Geraghty and into Lorenz’s years as well. Geraghty presided over an amazing collection of cartoon worlds: a mix of veterans, and stellar new additions like Edward Koren, who began contributing in 1962, Henry Martin who began in 1964, and William Hamilton, whose first drawing was published in 1965.

 

When I think of this era of the magazine I’m reminded of something William Shawn wrote for Brendan Gill’s Here at The New Yorker. In the piece, which was headed “Shawn on Ross” [Harold Ross, the magazine’s founder and first editor]:

 

“It was certainly not the least of Ross’s talents that he was able to see talent in writers and artists before it was plainly visible to everyone. Also, he understood that talent developed more slowly in some than others, and he was willing to wait. He gradually learned that the primary function of the magazine’s editor, including him, was to create a structure and an atmosphere – a little world apart from the world – within the writers and artists could fulfill themselves.”

 

Creating that “structure and atmosphere” was, I believe, the secret sauce of The New Yorker. It gave us, the readers, the opportunity to enjoy the worlds these artists found their way into.    

 

The New Yorker 1955- 1965 Album is an excellent cartoon collection gathering work by all these artists (it’s available for a song on ABEbooks.com).

 NYer Album 55-65back cover Album

 

 

 

A Comics Journal Interview with Glen Baxter

Posted on 24th July 2016 in News

Baxter_cover_updated_lettering_1024x1024From The Comics Journal, July 22, 2016, “I Never Thought of Myself as a Cartoonist: A Glen Baxter Interview” — Emily Flake talks to Mr. Baxter on the occasion of the release of his new book, Almost Completely Baxter: New and Selected Blurtings (New York Review Comics).

Mr. Baxter’s work first appeared in The New Yorker  May 8th 1989

Mashable: “The New Yorker’s Snapchat is Mesmerizing”; Eisner Award Winners

Posted on 23rd July 2016 in News

NYer SnapHere’s a fun read for a hot Saturday: a look at how The New Yorker uses Snapchat.  The magazine’s Art Editor, Francoise Mouly is featured along with the Cartoon editor’s assistant, Colin Stokes.

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Here’s a list of the Eisner Award winners announced at Comic-Con.  Of note are several New Yorker contributors, including Adrian Tomine (for Best Short Story — “Killing and Dying”)  and Peter Kuper, whose Ruins won in the category of Best Graphic Album — New.  Congrats to all!

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Liza Donnelly to Live Tweet Draw Dems Convention on CBS This Morning

Posted on 22nd July 2016 in News

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Liza Donnelly will be at the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia appearing on CBS This Morning live Tweet-drawing from Monday through the convention’s finale on Thursday.  You can find her on camera on CBS,  and on Twitter @lizadonnelly

Ms. Donnelly will also be Tweet-drawing for her home away from home,  The New Yorker.

Link to Ms. Donnelly’s website  here.

Website of Interest: A Cartoon & Comics Podcast Archive; Alex Gregory Nominated for an Emmy

Posted on 21st July 2016 in News

VMThe New Yorker cartoonist (and snowman expert), Bob Eckstein recently told me about a blog, Virtual Memories loaded with interviews of cartoonists (as well as non-cartoonists). The section, “Comics & Cartooning” lists  such interviewees as New Yorker contributors  Sam Gross, Ben Katchor, Ivan Brunetti, M.K. Brown, Roz Chast, Peter Kuper and Jules Feiffer.  Here’s a link.  Enjoy!

 

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Of Note: New Yorker cartoonist Alex Gregory has been nominated (along with Peter Huyck) for an Emmy in the category of Best Writing For a Comedy Series.  Mr. Gregory writes for “Veep” …Congrats Alex!

 

 

 

 

Haefeli Pencilled

Posted on 20th July 2016 in News

tumblr_inline_oakp7xDuNT1sj0qh6_500William Haefeli is the latest New Yorker cartoonist to share his tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils. See the post here.

Further reading: from Duke University’s Duke Magazine, July-August 2002, “The Art of the Cartoon” featuring a Haefeli cover and profile.

Fave Photo of the Day: Kuper, Feiffer, and Spiegelman

Posted on 18th July 2016 in News

Kuper Feiffer and Spiegelman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a great photo of three New Yorker contributors known widely for their work outside of the New Yorker.  From left to right: Peter Kuper, Jules Feiffer, and Art Spiegelman. All three were at the Queens Museum taking a look at “Bearing Witness”, an exhibit of William Gropper‘s work Mr. Gropper was a New Yorker cartoonist also known for his work outside of the magazine. (photo courtesy of Mr. Kuper)

Link here to Peter Kuper’s website (if you go to the “What’s New” pencil on his site you’ll see his New Yorker work)

Jules Feiffer’s Wiki page

Art Spiegelman’s Wiki page

 

Ink Spill’s entry on its A-Z for Mr. Gropper:

William Gropper   (Self portrait, above from The Business of Cartooning, 1939)  Born, December 3, 1897, NYC. Died, January 6, 1977, Manhasset, NY. 1 drawing, April 11, 1942. Quote:”I owe a great deal to the east side of New York. I was hit on the head with a rock in a gangfight…that’s how I became an artist.” [Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943]. For a brief bio of Gropper “the workingman’s protector” visit: http://specialcollections.wichita.edu/