Event of Interest: Blitt, Galindo, Taylor, Telnaes, & Donnelly at The Museum of The City of New York

Posted on 10th March 2017 in News

Cartooning The New Reality is the topic.  Barry Blitt, Felipe Galindo, Whit Taylor, Ann Telnaes are on a panel moderated by Liza Donnelly.

The date is March 23rd.

All the info here. The Museum has provided a discount code DRAW which allows people to buy $10 tickets (regularly $20). Go to this link and you’ll receive a discount on the entrance fee: http://bit.ly/2kUYX7Q

From the Museum’s website:

Barry Blitt, cover artist and illustrator for The New Yorker
Felipe Galindo, cartoonist for The New Yorker
Whit Taylor, cartoonist for The Nib, Fusion, PEN Illustrated, and others
Ann Telnaes, Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for The Washington Post
Liza Donnelly (moderator), cartoonist for The New Yorker, resident cartoonist for CBS News, and author of 16 books

An Edward Koren Exhibit & Talk; New Yorker’s Latest Cartoons, Rated On A Scale of 1 to 6; The Tilley Watch: Fact-Checking At The New Yorker

Posted on 9th March 2017 in News

An exhibit of original art by one of The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Gods, Edward Koren, will open Saturday March 18 at Vermont’s  Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. BMAC’S Website here.

From the press release:

Quirky creatures will…inhabit the exhibit SERIOUSLY FUNNY in the museum’s East Gallery. The exhibit consists of 16 original drawings and prints by longtime New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren, best known for his iconic, fuzzy-haired, long-nosed denizens of New York’s Upper West Side. Koren and curator Jeff Danziger will give a talk at BMAC on Thursday, April 20 at 7 p.m.

 

Here’s Mr. Koren’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Edward Koren (photo above,Fall 2016,courtesy of Gil Roth)  Born, 1935. New Yorker work: May 26, 1962 — . Key collections: Do You Want To Talk About It? (Pantheon,1976), Well, There’s Your Problem (Pantheon, 1980), Caution: Small Ensembles (Pantheon,1983).

Link here to Edward Koren’s website

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The mysterious “Max” and “Simon” have returned (along with the equally mysterious Mystery Guest New Yorker Cartoonist) to assess the latest New Yorker cartoons. This week: Krimstein’s coffee, Bliss’s spooky campfire story,  Borchart’s bees, and more.

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The Gray Lady sends off Bob Mankoff with a piece on his own cartoons (Emma Allen replaces Mr. Mankoff as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor this Spring).

Mr. Mankoff tells Ink Spill that one of his post-editorship projects,  The Encyclopedia Of New Yorker Cartoons, will contain, in his words, “a massive 4,000 cartoons” —  look for it in 2018.

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From The Columbia Journalism Review, March 8, 2017, “The New Yorker’s chief fact-checker on how to get things right in the era of ‘post-truth'” —  Peter Canby (shown below), who has been  at The New Yorker since 1978, talks fact-checking. 

 

The Long Island Connection: Wolcott Gibbs, John O’Hara, and Charles Addams

Posted on 7th March 2017 in News

Photo, left-right: John O’Hara, Elinor & Wolcott Gibbs, Charles Addams

Here are three stellar New Yorker contributors whose private lives intertwined with their professional lives — i.e., they were friends. Curiously, or maybe not so curiously, they all at one time  called Long Island home (Gibbs on Fire Island, O’Hara in Quogue, Addams in Westhampton Beach).  Here’s a quick look at their professional intersections (not including within the pages of The New Yorker itself).  Let’s begin with Charles Addams’s wonderful cover art for Brendan Gill’s 1975 Here At The New Yorker, in which all three of these fellows appear:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top left, John O’Hara by Addams; top right: Wolcott Gibbs by Addams; bottom: Charles Addams by Addams

 

 

 

 

Gibbs wrote the Introduction to Addams’s 1947 collection, Addams and Evil. Here’s a portion of it:

“Altogether, if you have to have the dismal facts, I’m embarrassed to say that as far as I can tell he is just a hell of a nice guy, whose habits are probably a good deal less sinister than yours or, for that matter, even mine.”

 

Jonh O’Hara wrote the foreword to Addams’s 1950 collection, Monster Rally.  It reads, in part:

“Addams is a big man, about 6’1″ and around 195, a toxophilist who can handle a sixty-pound pull, but I don’t think he’d hurt a fly. I never have seen him lose his temper, although that is not to say he doesn’t get mad. He happens to be what is called easy-going, and has a decent contempt for the opinions of mankind.”

 

 

 

Addams provided the book jacket art for Gibbs on several occasions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more on Wolcott Gibbs and his role in The New Yorker‘s Art Department, here’s an Ink Spill piece from a few years back.

For much much more on Gibbs I highly recommend Thomas Vinciguerra’s recent book, Cast Of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber and the Golden Age of The New Yorker (W.W. Norton & Co., 2015)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And as for Charles Addams, there’s no better place to go than Linda Davis’s Charles Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life (Random House, 2006)

 

 

For Addams’s work:  any of his cartoon collections will do just fine.

 

 

 

 

Mr. O’Hara has been the subject of a number of biographies. Here’s one: The Life of John O’Hara by Frank MacShane (E.P. Dutton, 1980).  There’s a mountain of work by Mr. O’Hara available and another mountain of information available online.

 

 

 

 

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Two Books of Interest by Two New Yorker Cover Artists: Blitt and Cuneo

Posted on 6th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Cuneo‘s Not Waving But Drawing has just been published by Fantagraphics.

From the publisher:

You know John Cuneo from his award-winning illustrations that have graced the pages of Esquire or the covers of The New Yorker, but less known is the kinds of over-the-top and hilariously perverse cartoons that fill the pages of Not Waving But Drawing. Assembling Cuneo’s best privately drawn sketchbook pages, each page immediately introduces us to unique takes on sex and domestic life in his signature squiggly style. Not Waving But Drawing is full of dark thoughts, lightly rendered. Full-color illustrations throughout

 

Barry Blitts  Blitt is due in October from Riverhead.

From the publisher:
This lavish full-color collection showcases over a quarter century of Blitt’s most iconic work: his New Yorker covers, from the infamous Obama fist bump and George W. Bush’s drowning cabinet to the many misadventures of Donald Trump; his long-running collaboration with Frank Rich for New York Times op-ed page; and his illustrations for Vanity Fair, Time, Entertainment Weekly, and others. Blitt also shares his sketchbooks, drafts, and unpublished art, offering readers an exclusive view into the creative process of one of the foremost political cartoonists of our time. 
 
Featuring annotations from the author, more than 100 never-before-seen sketches and drafts, and original essays from Blitt’s collaborators and peers, this book is both a visual delight and a fascinating trip into the mind of a truly original artist. 

 

Charlie Hankin Speaks; Christoph Niemann Profiled on Netflix’s “Abstract”; Eustace Tilley’s Non-Anniversary Cover Appearances

Posted on 4th March 2017 in News

 

 

This piece on  Charlie Hankin, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2013:  “Catching Up with New Yorker cartoonist and Park School grad Charlie Hankin” (The Baltimore Sun, March 4, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link here to Mr. Hankin’s website.

 

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Christoph Niemann, who’s contributed nearly two dozen covers to The New Yorker (and plenty of illustrations) is the subject of episode #1 in the Netflix series “Abstract”–  here’s a link to the Netflix site (where Netflix  offers a free trial…I’m not promoting Netflix, just offering the information).  — My thanks to New Yorker cover aritst, John Cuneo for bringing this series to my attention.

Link here to Mr. Niemann’s website where you can see an abundance of his work.

 

 

 

 

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There’s been a lot of Eustace Tilley talk on Ink Spill lately — below is Mr. Niemann’s take on Rea Irvin’s masterpiece. Titled “Icon” it appeared on The New Yorker, May 27 2002. It was a rare non-anniversary Tilley inspired cover appearance. I can only think of three other such occasions. They appear below Mr. Niemann’s cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More non-anniversary Tilley-inspired cover appearances: Barry Blitt in 1999, Bob Zoell in 2002, and Ana Juan in 2005

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Tom Toro Talks Trump; Messing Around With The New Yorker’s Logo

Posted on 3rd March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the latest installment of The Cartoon Companion:  Ed Steed’s fowl: chickens or ducks?…plus Dernavich’s refrigerator, Cotham’s stairway to heaven, and more.

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Tom Toro has been drawing a lot of Trumps lately.  He talks about the experience on the Huffington Post: “New Yorker Cartoonist Explains Why Humor is the Heartbeat of Democracy”

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website

 

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The latest New Yorker features a Russian-inspired Eustace Tilley and Rea Irvin typeface.

You might wonder when the magazine has played with its look before.  Here are just a few examples:

 

Rea Irvin (of course!) broke  the mold first. Jan 2, 1932

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S. Liam Dunne in 1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rea Irvin (again) in 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one-and-only Helen Hokinson in 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Stevenson in 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Stevenson again in 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Allen To Succeed New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

Posted on 2nd March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a memo to all New Yorker Cartoonists this afternoon, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick announced that  Emma Allen, a New Yorker editor will succeed Bob Mankoff as cartoon editor in two months time.

In part, the memo reads:

The person I’ve chosen to be the next cartoon editor is Emma Allen, who has worked in recent years an editor of The Talk of the Town, a writer, and the driving force behind Daily Shouts, which is one of the best features of newyorker.com. Unlike Bob and Lee, she is not a cartoonist, but then neither was James Geraghty, who did the job before Lee. (Hell, William Shawn was not a writer, either, and he wasn’t too bad in the editing department.) Emma has a terrific eye for talent, knows the history of cartooning deeply, and is an immensely energetic and intelligent and sympathetic editor. She will work with Colin Stokes on selecting cartoons, running the caption contest, and creating a bigger digital footprint for cartoons. I am quite sure that we have only just begun to figure out new ways to explore and exploit digital technologies as a way to distribute your work to more and new readers. All of this is intended to stake out a healthy future for cartoons at The New Yorker.

Ms. Allen will be the third person in the magazine’s history in charge of editing its cartoons (Rea Irvin, who helped the magazine’s founder develop the New Yorker’s cartoon culture, was considered the art supervisor).  James Geraghty,  hired in 1939, was the first official cartoon editor (his title was Art Editor).  Lee Lorenz succeeded Mr. Geraghty in 1973 and held that position (as Art Editor from 1973 -1993 and then as cartoon editor from 1993-1997) until Mr. Mankoff was appointed in ’97.

Update: In a statement released to the press, Mr. Mankoff had this to say:

“My greatest gratitude goes to the cartoonists. I know how much easier it is to pick a good cartoon than do one, much less the many thousands they have done and will continue to do,” Mankoff said. “And, continue they will, with Emma Allen who now takes over this most iconic of all New Yorker features. I wish her and them the best of luck. And me, too—I’ve got to find that old cartoon pen of mine.” 

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The filmmaker Sally Williams has been hard at work on her documentary about James Stevenson. Here’s a brief clip from the film.

Link here for even more on Sally Williams

Link here to see some of Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker work

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Helen Hokinson on A Case For Pencils; A “New” Cartoonist from 1999; Swann Galleries New Yorker Cartoon Offerings

Posted on 1st March 2017 in News

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post features the late very great Helen Hokinson. Take a look!

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

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This morning while revisiting Thomas Kunkel’s Man In Profile: Joseph Mitchell of The New Yorker (Random House, 2015), I came across a passage about  former New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb speaking of his meetings with Mr. Mitchell. The source of the quote led me to the 1999  New Yorker anniversary issue (with an Edward Sorel cover. Eustace Tilley was relegated to a small box on the advertising flap partially obscuring the cover) where Mark Singer’s “Joe Mitchell’s Secret” appears.  On the way to Mr. Singer’s piece I came upon a cartoon by a cartoonist that somehow missed my attention while compiling Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:   Ham Khan.

This is the first and only appearance (at this date) by Ham Khan in the magazine. The number of new cartoonists brought in by Bob Mankoff since he became Cartoon Editor has risen to 129.

Ink Spill will eventually take a close look at how this influx of cartoonists compares to Mr. Mankoff’s predecessors, James Geraghty (1939-1973) and Lee Lorenz (1973-1997).

 

 

 

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The Swann Galleries latest catalog is online.  It’s much fun for those who love original cartoon and cover art from The New Yorker.

Shown here: a gorgeous cover by Arthur Getz.

Mr. Getz’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913;  died, 1996. NYer work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career  was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published,  and one cover).    According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

 

 

Gerberg at The New School Tonight; Another New Cartoonist at The New Yorker; An Early Sidney Harris Collection

Posted on 28th February 2017 in News

A reminder that long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Mort Gerberg will be speaking at The New School this evening. All the details here.

Mr. Gerberg’s entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Mort Gerberg Born, March 11, 1931, New York, NY.  NYer work: April 10, 1965 – .  Co-edited, with Ron Wolin & Ed Fisher,  The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons (Charles Scribner & Son, 1975).

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Earlier this month it was noted here that the work of two new cartoonists had been added to the magazine’s stable of cartoonists (Jeremy Nguyen and Alice Cheng). The number of new cartoonists added to The New Yorker’s stable of cartoonists  in 2017 is now  three.   The latest issue of the magazine, March 6, 2017 contains yet another new addition, Jim Benton.

Last year 16 new cartoonists were added (a record high). According to Ink Spill’s fairly reliable tally  of new cartoonists added since Bob Mankoff became cartoon editor in 1997 the total is now 128.  That number counts teams of cartoonists as one (sorry team members!).

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Following a discussion with a fellow cartoonist the other day about Sidney Harris’s cartoon collections, I went online to see if I could find a non-themed collection of his.  Mr. Harris has published a lot of  themed collections (his latest, 101 Funny Things About Global Warming is an anthology featuring his own work and the work of a number of his colleagues), but I could not recall what I think of as a standard collection, such as say Charles Addams’s Favorite Haunts.   In less than a few seconds the title shown here popped up. Pardon Me, Miss! was published by Dell in 1973 (his first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of July 9, 1973).  The title will be added to Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists Library.

 

Donnelly’s Oscar Drawings; Found: A 34 Year Old Jack Ziegler Greeting Card

Posted on 27th February 2017 in News

A slide-show of Oscar drawings  by New Yorker cartoonist and CBS News resident cartoonist, Liza Donnelly. Ms. Donnelly was on the scene (see left)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here’s a greeting card from 1983 I ran across today while sorting materials in the Ink Spill archives. Good stuff from the great Jack Ziegler! I’ll post some other materials re-discovered throughout the week.