Reminder: Barry Blitt, Felipe Galindo, Liza Donnelly, Whit Taylor, Ann Telnaes at The Museum of the City of New York Tomorrow Night!

Posted on 22nd March 2017 in News

 

A reminder of tomorrow night’s event  at The Museum of The City of New York:

Barry Blitt, Felipe Galindo, Whit Taylor, Ann Telnaes are on a panel moderated by Liza Donnelly.

The subject is:  Cartooning the New Reality.

From the Museum’s website:

Barry Blitt, cover artist and illustrator for The New Yorker
Felipe Galindo, cartoonist for The New Yorker
Whit Taylor, cartoonist for The Nib, Fusion, PEN Illustrated, and others
Ann Telnaes, Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for The Washington Post
Liza Donnelly (moderator), cartoonist for The New Yorker, resident cartoonist for CBS News, and author of 16 books

This program is co-presented by PEN America.

All the info here. The Museum has provided a discount code DRAW which allows people to buy $10 tickets (regularly $20). Go to this link and you’ll receive a discount on the entrance fee: http://bit.ly/2kUYX7Q

Russell Maloney on New Yorker Cartoons: “In The New Yorker the Pictures Do Not Illustrate the Jokes; They ARE the Jokes”

Posted on 20th March 2017 in News

 

Here’s Russell Maloney’s Introduction to a 1945 special publication, The New Yorker Cartoons with The Talk of The Town  / Special Edition for the Armed Forces.* If you’re wondering who Russell Maloney is or was, and why he would be writing an Introduction to an anthology of New Yorker cartoons, here’s a link to an Ink Spill piece that connects the dots.

Interesting that even in 1945, twenty years after The New Yorker began publishing, the magazine was still explaining how its cartoons differed from the old “he/she cartoons” popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.  Even more interesting (and illuminating!) is Maloney’s precision take on the gamut of New Yorker cartoons appearing in the magazine’s first twenty years, from the timely (“they were funny once… but they wouldn’t be now”) to the evergreens (“aimed above rather than below the neck”). After all these years that mix (to use a Tina Brown-ism) remains the same right up to the latest issue of The New Yorker which includes a cartoon about binge-watching, as well as a cartoon depicting a pole vaulting knight.

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*According to a label glued on to the last page, the original edition of this anthology was “produced under wartime conditions at the request of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps and delivered gratis to our Armed Forces overseas.”  This particular edition is in hardcover, “made available in The United States and to civilians for the first time.”

 

 

Video of Interest: John Updike & New Yorker Cartoons; From Ink Spill’s Archives: Art of The New Yorker Ephemera

Posted on 19th March 2017 in News

 

The late John Updike (he died in 2009) wrote almost as much about the magazine’s cartoons and cartoonists as any New Yorker contributor outside of the Art/Cartoon Department [see below].  Here we have a chance to see him for five and-a-half minutes,  up close with some of the magazine’s most iconic drawings, including James Thurber’s Seal in the Bedroom, Charles Addams’s skier and Peter Arno’s “Well, back to the old drawing board.”  The video comes out of WGBH’s archive (that’s the Boston public television station). My guess is that Updike was visiting the traveling exhibit of art tied into the New Yorker‘s 60th anniversary in 1985.   Here’s the link.  Enjoy!

A Selected List of Updike on New Yorker Cartoons and Cartoonists:

Introduction to Christmas at The New Yorker: Stories, Poems, Humor, and Art (2003)

Thurber’s Art — a contribution to Cartoon America: Comic Art in the Library of Congress (2006)

A Tribute to Saul Steinberg for The New York Review of Books (1999).

Introduction to The World of William Steig, edited by Lee Lorenz (1998)

Introduction to a section (“The Fourth Decade: 1955- 1964”) of The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker (2004)

Introduction to Poor Arnold’s Almanac (1998) *the “Arnold” is Arnold Roth

Note for an Exhibit of New Yorker cartoons at The Art Institute of Boston (1993)

Review of  Steinberg’s The Discovery of America (in The New York Review of Books, 1992)

 

Some ephemera from the exhibit:

When the show ran its course, the art was returned to the contributing artists.  With the art, the Nicholls Gallery included the slip of paper you see below (Barbara Nicholls curated the exhibit). We can see that the exhibit Updike likely visited was at The Boston Athenaeum:

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the opening night in New York (at The New York Public Library, not The Yorker Public Library as it’s spelled on the Nicholls sheet. The New Yorker did have then, and continues to have now, its own library, but it’s not generally open to the public), attendees were offered a swag bag on the way out of the exhibit. The bag contained a brochure, a large Charles Addams poster as well as a copy of The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985, and a packet of postcards, all shown below except for the poster, which is too big for my scanner — the image is the same as you see on the bag and postcard):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob Eckstein’s Kong; John Donohue’s Restaurants of New York

Posted on 18th March 2017 in News

Who doesn’t like a good King Kong cover.  Every so often Ink Spill posts covers proposed to The New Yorker but not accepted. I’m grateful to Bob Eckstein for providing his “Kong vrs Amazon” cover.

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Opening tonight!

Editor, Author and Cartoonist, John Donohue has launched All the Restaurants in New York(where you can see his efforts).

His debut show, of nine limited edition prints, is at the PowerHouse Bookstore in Park Slope (1111 Eighth Ave, between 11th and 12th Sts., Brooklyn). The opening reception is tonight,  March 18,  from 4-6 — all are welcome.

Extra reading: From Eater: New York, March 17, 2017,  “Every Restaurant in New York, Illustrated: A Former New Yorker Editor Documents Facades Online”

American Bystander #4’s Kickstarter Campaign

Posted on 17th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you like cartoons, if you like humor, if you like comedy, if you like humorous writing, if you like humorous illustration, if you like laughing, if you like reading, if you like reading and laughing, if you like the idea of holding a fun and funny print publication in your hands, then The American Bystander is for you. The latest issue of this wonderful magazine is now in the final week-and-a-half of its Kickstarter campaign.  Please go here to read all about it — and help fund!

But don’t just take my word for it.  The New York Times called American Bystander “An essential read for comedy nerds”

 

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Swann’s Ad with Addams “Z” Subway Car; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Book of Interest: Shannon Wheeler’s “Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump”

Posted on 16th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Was pleased and surprised to come across this full page Swann ad in today’s New York Times (the special “F” section devoted to Museums).  The Addams drawing, included in an upcoming auction, originally appeared in The New Yorker October 1, 1979. That issue, to me, is memorable. For starters the cover, by R.O. Blechman,  is one of my all-time favorite New Yorker covers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The roster of cartoonists in the issue included some heavy hitters from the magazine’s golden age, including George Price (whose drawing in the issue is three-quarters of a page), William Steig, Addams of course, and James Stevenson (represented by a full page drawing).  Also in the issue are some of James Geraghty’s best additions from his later years manning the art editor’s desk: Lee Lorenz, Warren Miller, Edward Koren, Robert Weber, and J.B. Handelsman.  And there are a number of the new kids brought in by Geraghty’s successor, Lee Lorenz: Arnie Levin, Jack Ziegler, Bob Mankoff, Roz Chast and yours truly (another reason the issue was memorable for me: it contained my first sequential drawing).

Looking through the issue at the cartoons one can’t help but notice how the  cartoons sit in a wide variety of space. Price’s three-quarters page, Stevenson’s beautiful full page, my own multi-panel spread bleeding onto a second page, Ziegler’s drawing (the first of two Zieglers in the issue) in an upright rectangle surrounded on three sides by text; Mankoff’s drawing and Arnie Levin’s as well as Addams’s allowed to spread across the width of the page. Weber’s gorgeous drawing run large, and  set so perfectly on the page. What’s even more remarkable about this issue is that it wasn’t unusual — this is what was normal in that time.

 

Here’s what the Addams drawing looked like in that issue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The only blog offering a critical take on each week’s New Yorker cartoons returns with a look at  cavemen pondering their wardrobe, a drafty Hades, a King’s best friend, King Kong’s mom & pop, and 8 more.   Read it here.

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Coming from Top Shelf Productions this summer, Shannon Wheeler’s Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump.

From the publisher:

Acclaimed cartoonist Shannon Wheeler (The New Yorker, God Is Disappointed in You, Too Much Coffee Man) transforms Donald Trump’s most revealing tweets into razor-sharp cartoons, offering a subversive and illuminating insight into the mind of the most divisive political figure of our time. Whether you love him or hate him, this take on Trump will help you come to grips with the man and his ideas thanks to Wheeler’s signature mix of slapstick and sophistication.

Details here.

New Case For Pencils: Liza Donnelly on Barbara Shermund

Posted on 15th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly, who knows a thing or two about New Yorker cartoonist history (she authored Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Great Woman Cartoonists and Their Cartoons) discusses the late great Barbara Shermund on Jane Mattimoe’s newest Case For Pencils. Read it here!

Snow Daze

Posted on 14th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While watching the snow pile up here outside of Ink Spill’s Home Office I was reminded of my all-time favorite snow cartoon. This classic drawing by Liza Donnelly appeared in The New Yorker, March 7, 1994:

Steig Covers Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker

Posted on 13th March 2017 in News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few days ago I took a look at Charles Addams’s original cover for Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker (Random House, 1975).  Today I’m adding the 1990 edition of that book to the Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists Library. This edition, published in the UK by Heinemann, features  a William Steig cover originally published by the New Yorker, February 14, 1964.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An even later edition (De Capo Press, 1997) features a typically exuberant Frank Modell drawing:

 

 

 

Luckily, Mr. Gill kept adding new introductions as each edition appeared, giving us a kind of play-by-play as the New Yorker‘s editors and the magazine itself changed over time.

A bonus tucked away at the end of every edition: “Shawn On Ross” — nearly eight pages about Harold Ross written by his successor, William Shawn.

From Ink Spill’s Archives: An Early Cartoon Bank Brochure

Posted on 11th March 2017 in News

As we rapidly approach the end of Bob Mankoff’s tenure as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Ink Spill takes a quick look back to the mid 1990s (before Mr. Mankoff was appointed by Tina Brown to that position) when he founded something called the Cartoon Bank. The CB (as it came to be called in the cartoon community) was eventually sold to Conde Nast.

Mr. Mankoff wrote in his memoir, How About Never — Is Never Good For You: “I agreed to sell the Cartoon Bank [to Conde Nast] as long as two conditions were met: (1) I would continue to be its president and (2) I would also become cartoon editor.”

  Here’s a brochure cover from those pre-Conde Nast Cartoon Bank days and a page out of the brochure describing the “birth of the Cartoon Bank”: