Being Eustace Tilley; Roger Angell Remembers James Stevenson; Oscar Time! Liza Donnelly Back on the Red Carpet Live Drawing the Oscars, Drooker’s Oscar Cover, Eckstein’s Oscar Wielding Eustace

Posted on 25th February 2017 in News

 

 

Eustace Tilley is of course a fictional character — commonly referred to as The New Yorker‘s mascot.  There is a suggested backstory to Tilley himself in Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995; there are best guesses elsewhere as to why Rea Irvin (see below) decided to submit the cover to Harold Ross to adorn Ross’s inaugural issue and there are probably just as many best guesses as to why Ross chose to use Irvin’s submission.

Following the advent of the New Yorker, it didn’t take long for a Tilley stand-in to show up; a New Yorker in-house publication featured Harold Ross as Tilley and Alexander Woollcott as the butterfly hovering at Tilley’s eye-level.  Over the years there have been innumerable parody New Yorkers (Ink Spill has a selection here).  But how many real people, after Harold Ross, have stood in for Tilley on a New Yorker cover or on another magazine’s cover.

If you search online you’ll see perhaps hundreds of Tilley stand-ins, some on the cover of The New Yorker itself, many submitted to the New Yorker as part of a contest, many just for personal amusement (Tilley as Disney’s Goofy, or Mad’s Alfred E. Neuman, Dr. Seuss’s Cat In The Hat, etc., etc.)    But here I’m concentrating on published covers featuring real people (and one real dog) as Tilley.   I’ve found just a few (please let me know of others that fit this category…update: my thanks to Attempted Bloggery for reminding me about the Eustace Clinton/Obama cover ):

 

First the real deal: Rea Irvin’s classic cover:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker‘s in-house issue featuring Harold Ross.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renata Adler as Tilley on Manhattan, Inc. November 1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York magazine, July 20, 1982,  with Tina Brown as Tilley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s 75th anniversary issue, February 21, 2000, with a William Wegman dog as Tilley (and one of his dogs standing in for the butterfly)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Eustace Tillarobama” (credited to Rea Irvin and Seth) February 11, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And that brings us to the March 6, 2017  The New Yorker, with Barry Blitt’s  “Eustace Vladimirovich Tilley” and Donald J. Trump as the butterfly

Image result for eustace tilley putin

 

Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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…From the New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 25, 2017, “Looking At The Field” Roger Angell on James Stevenson’s art and writing.

photo: Mr. Stevenson in Westport, Connecticut in 2015

 

 

 

 

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Oscar Time!

…Liza Donnelly has been out in Hollywood all week drawing  the scene as the Academy Awards prepares for its big night. Following her historic appearance last year as the first ever cartoonist live drawing on the Red Carpet, she will be back again tomorrow night drawing the stars and the hooplah.

Check out her drawings @lizadonnelly  and  @CBSThisMorning

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The New Yorker’s  Oscar cover, February 27, 2017 by Eric Drooker (titled “#OscarsNotSoWhite”)

 

 

 

 

 

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…I’ll wrap up this post appropriately enough with Bob Eckstein’s Eustace holding an Oscar. Be sure to follow Mr. Ecksteins coverage of the big event on newyorker.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Lorenz On James Stevenson; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Posted on 24th February 2017 in News

“Postscript: James Stevenson”

James Stevenson is remembered by the great cartoonist  Lee Lorenz  who, as The New Yorker‘s  Art Editor guided the magazine’s Art Department (that included the cartoons and the covers) from 1973 through 1993, and then served as Cartoon Editor from 1993 through 1997.  Mr. Lorenz was Mr. Stevenson’s editor from 1973 through 1993.

 

More Stevenson:

…from the Greenwich Times, February 21, 2017,  “James Stevenson, New Yorker Cartoonist, Cos Cob Resident, Dies”

…from The New York Times, February 24, 2017, “James Stevenson, Ex-New Yorker illustrator, Dies at 87” *

*If only someone at The New York Times could change “Ex-New Yorker Illustrator” to “New Yorker Cartoonist” — Mr. Stevenson was first and foremost a New Yorker cartoonist.

UPDATE: The online headline for Mr. Stevenson’s New York Times obit has just been changed to read “New Yorker Cartoonist” …thank you, NYTs!

…Special Note: Attempted Bloggery has been featuring art by Mr. Stevenson all week.  Check it out!

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The latest Cartoon Companion is posted. The two anonymous critics take a close look at the cartoons appearing in the issue of February 27th.  A new rating system is in effect.

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New Yorker Cartoonist Extraordinaire, James Stevenson, Has Died

Posted on 18th February 2017 in News

 

Ink Spill has learned  this morning that James Stevenson, who contributed to The New Yorker for nearly half a century and was the very definition of a New Yorker cartoonist, has died. The news was conveyed by his wife, Josephine Merck.

 

Photo: James Stevenson in the 1960s

 

Mr. Stevenson, born in New York City in 1929, found his way to The New Yorker in 1947. “I was not hired on merit,” Mr. Stevenson wrote in The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell — “My mother was  a friend of the Fiction Editor, William Maxwell.” He worked for that summer as an office boy, and a part-time supplier of cartoon ideas.  Nine years later he was hired by the Art Editor, James Geraghty, as a full-time ideaman.  Mr. Stevenson recalled that Mr. Geraghty turned to him after the hiring handshake and said, “You must not tell anybody at the office or anywhere else what you do.”

 

 

 

 

Stevenson’s own drawings were eventually  published in the magazine beginning in March of 1956 (his first appears here).  He went on to become one of scant few New Yorker contributors who could say they had contributed written pieces in the magazine as well as covers, cartoons, and illustrations, or spot drawings. James Thurber, Lou Myers and Peter Arno come to mind as the only other members of that club. I once mentioned to Mr. Stevenson how energetic he seemed, considering the amount and variety of his contributions to The New Yorker.  He replied, “I had to be energetic — I had a large family.”  In a career at the magazine that lasted 47 years, he published nearly 80 covers.  His astounding  number of cartoons –1,987 — places him, according to Ink Spill’s calculations, in the top five contributing artists in the magazine’s history (the other four being William Steig, Lee Lorenz, Alan Dunn, and Helen Hokinson).

 

Below: a Stevenson cartoon from The New Yorker, June 11, 1999

For me, as a kid just out of college beginning at The New Yorker, Mr. Stevenson’s work and the work of his colleagues, was my real education. I noted immediately that Stevenson’s world was inhabited by drawings that connected to the very moment. His seemingly effortless line flowed buoyantly across the page, welcoming us in, and then, as the best cartoons do, surprising us with a caption we never saw coming; in those pre-social media days, Stevenson expertly distilled and commented on a news item or cultural event as quickly as a cartoonist working for a weekly publication could possibly manage. It’s difficult enough for any cartoonist to successfully do that kind of drawing on any given week, but Stevenson’s gift allowed us to laugh out loud (or on the inside) nearly 2000 times, almost weekly, for close to half a century.

In 2013 Mr. Stevenson published a book about his best friend, and New Yorker colleague, Frank Modell.  Mr. Stevenson is shown here, to the left, with Mr, Modell in a photo taken in the mid-to-late 1970s or early 1980s.

Below: one of my all-time favorite Stevenson covers.  The best New Yorker artists share with us a moment.  This moment has stuck with me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a personal note: I had an opportunity to meet Mr. Stevenson within the first few years of my time at The New Yorker, in February of 1980.  Standing in a circle of cartoonists at the magazine’s annual  anniversary party in the grand ballroom of The Pierre, Mr. Stevenson was directly across from me. But instead of reaching out my hand and introducing myself, I kept mum;  he was, after all, one of the magazine’s biggest stars. It took more than thirty years for us to finally connect, first on the telephone and later in person. Our first meeting, via a telephone call (he graciously agreed to speak with me about his early days at The New Yorker) was filled with good cheer and plenty of laughs — it was as if we’d known each other for years.

 

 

Here’s Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z entry for Mr. Stevenson:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929.  NYer work: March 10, 1956 -.   Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began  supplying ideas for other NYer artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000.   Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978).  Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit.  He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

The Evolution of a Hair Raising Cartoon; Donnelly, Chast, Finck and Flake on a Pen America Festival Panel

Posted on 17th February 2017 in News

From Liza Donnelly, “The News is Hair-Raising: The Evolution of a New York Times Cartoon Gif” — Ms. Donnelly explains how a drawing developed into an animated piece that accompanied a recent New York Times op-ed piece.

 

 

 

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This event of note from The Pen World Voices Festival: Gender and Power:

Women in Ink: The New Yorker’s Liza Donnelly brings together cartoonists Roz Chast, Liana Finck and Emily Flake to talk about the unique challenges of succeeding in a traditionally male-dominated field. (Dixon Place; Saturday, May 6)

Link here to the site for further events and information.

A Note from Ink Spill

Posted on 16th February 2017 in News

Due to technical difficulties, Ink Spill was offline this morning. Once it was brought back  two of the most recent posts were missing. I’ll try to reconstruct yesterday’s post (“Ink Spill’s Go-To Blogs”)…in the meantime I offer up  this New Yorker drawing of mine from the July 11th, 1983 issue. Click on the drawing to enlarge — I realize the caption is small.

Another First: Liza Donnelly Live Tweet Draws on the Grammy Awards Red Carpet

Posted on 13th February 2017 in News

Another “First” for Liza Donnelly as she brought Live Tweet Drawing to the Red Carpet at the Grammys.  The  New Yorker cartoonist & CBS News Resident Cartoonist was also the first to live draw from the Oscars Red Carpet.

Link here to CBS This Morning for a slide show  of Ms. Donnelly’s work

Link here to her website.

 

 

Think Good Thoughts About an Exhibition: George Booth Show Coming to The Society of Illustrators in the Fall

Posted on 10th February 2017 in News

This Fall the Society of Illustrators  will  exhibit work by one of the New Yorker’s greatest artists, George Booth. Mr. Booth’s daughter, Sarah Booth,  told Ink Spill that besides the hanging art “there  will also be video and pictures and [a concentration] on George’s process, how he worked with cut and paste to the final cartoon.”  More information will be posted here as we move closer to the opening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Mr. Booth’s entry on Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

George Booth Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. NYer work: 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998)

 

Photo: George Booth in New York, 2016.  Courtesy of Liza Donnelly

 

 

The New Yorker Anniversary Issue’s Cartoons Evaluated

Posted on 10th February 2017 in News

Cartoon Companion is back with a look at the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker. Take a look here!

EW Reveals Cover for Roz Chast’s Going Into Town

Posted on 8th February 2017 in News

 

Entertainment Weekly has posted the cover for Roz Chast‘s upcoming book, Going Into Town: A Love Letter To New York, due in October.  To see the full cover and read the article’s short interview, go here.

 

Link here to Ms. Chast’s website

Of Interest: Twohy’s New Book; Zach Kanin’s Sitcom

Posted on 7th February 2017 in News

Mike Twohy‘s latest kids book is out — here’s a very nice review.

Mr. Twohy has been contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker since 1980. See his work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

Here’s one of my favorite Twohy drawings (published in The New Yorker in 1995):

 

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And speaking of nice reviews, here’s The New York Times weighing in on Detroiters,  a brand new sitcom (it airs on the Comedy Central channel) co-written by our colleague, Zach Kanin. He began contributing his cartoons to the magazine in 2005.

Here’s Mr. Kanin’s New Yorker work on the Cartoon Bank site.

And here’s a favorite Kanin New Yorker drawing (published in the magazine in 2016):