Karasik Pencilled; What Four Hundred Pennies Will Buy

Posted on 31st August 2016 in News

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Island man, Paul Karasik, is next up sharing the tools of his trade on Jane Mattimoe’s great blog, A Case For Pencils

Mr. Karasik’s very own blog, Rules to Vivere By  can be found by linking here.

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Complete

Recently while researching a cartoonist’s work for an upcoming Spill interview I ran into trouble when Disc #2 :1984 – 1997 of The Complete New Yorker would no longer fully function.  I made it all the way into the cartoonist’s work in 1994 before the cartoon carpet was pulled out from under me.

A quick online visit to Amazon resulted in finding a sealed copy of The Complete New Yorker for a penny (plus a $3.99 for shipping & handling). I realize The Complete New Yorker is  old news to those of you who bought this back in 2005;  If you never bought it,  the good news is what it can now be had for. For the price of a slice-and-a-half of pizza every single issue of The New Yorker from February 21, 1925 up through  December 20, 2004 is available (using the accompanying 8 dvd-roms). It’s not perfect — I’ve found (and others have found) inaccuracies in the database,  but by and large it’s a fine piece of work. While researching my biography of Peter Arno, I used these discs along with the discs included with The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker. I’m hoping the magazine puts out an updated version of this for its 100th birthday. In the meantime, if you want to dive really deep into the magazine  — and what a trip it is  —  all you’ll need are four hundred pennies.

“Bending of Lines: The Women of Cartooning” Exhibit at the Kenosha Festival of Cartooning; More Spills with Liza Donnelly and Bob Eckstein

Posted on 30th August 2016 in News

KFOC+2016+KPM+Poster+image+SSThe Kenosha (Wisconsin) Festival of Cartooning is almost upon us (September 15 – 17).  Three days of presentations as well as an exhibit of original work by over 30 artists, including the likes of Helen Hokinson*, Liza Donnelly, Trina Robbins, Isabella Bannerman,  Rina Piccolo, Maria Scrivan, Hilda Terry, Ramona Fradon, Jen Sorensen & Hilary Price.  Details here.

*bolded names are New Yorker contributors

 

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arts Mid-Hudson logoMs. Donnelly will also be in an exhibit closer to home this Fall, joining me in a show of some of our New Yorker cartoons at Arts Mid-Hudson .  Details here.

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Bob Eckstein‘s eagerly awaited  Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers is the subject of Brenda Cronin’s  Wall Street Journal  article (& video), “Bob Eckstein’s Tribute to Beloved Bookstores”

Eckstein's books

 

 

The Realist Cartoon Anthology; The Tilley Watch

Posted on 29th August 2016 in News

Back in June of 2015 Ink Spill noted: It’s going to be awhile before this appears in bookstores (April of 2016) but the wait will be worth it.  Here’s a description  from the publisher (Fantagraphics):Realist

The Realist was a legendary satirical periodical that ran from 1958 to 2001 and published some of the most incendiary cartoons that ever appeared in an American magazine. The Realist Cartoons collects, for the first time, the best, the wittiest, and the most provocative drawings that appeared in its pages, including work by R. Crumb, Art Spiegelman, S. Clay Wilson, Jay Lynch, Trina Robbins, Mort Gerberg, Jay Kinney, Richard Guindon, Nicole Hollander, Skip Williamson, and many others.

Zooming up to late August of 2016, it looks like the book, with a different cover, is set to appear November 1.  Read all about it here on the Fantagraphics site. :

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Tilley Watch...…Seems like only twelve days ago we made note of  a cartoonist’s debut in the magazine. This week, there’s another: Emily Nemens. Ms. Nemens is either the tenth or eleventh new cartoonist added to The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists in the past eight months.

A Glen Baxter Sampler; Comics Academic Karen Green Interviewed

Posted on 28th August 2016 in News

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The New York Review of Books takes a look at some of the work in Glen Baxter’s new book, Almost Completely Baxter: New and Selected Blurtings (published by New York Review Comics).

 

 

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2For anyone interested in the who what where why and when of the ever expanding graphic novel collection at Columbia University this interview’s for you.  Karen Green, a friend to all comic artists (and to Ink Spill), is the subject of a lengthy interview by Art Cloos on Scoop.

New Website: Ken Krimstein

Posted on 26th August 2016 in News

K.comIt’s been some time since a New Yorker cartoonist started up a new website. Thankfully,  Ken Krimstein has broken that dry spell.  See his site here.

Book of Interest… Peter Kuper: Conversations

Posted on 24th August 2016 in News

Kuper Conversations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due this October From University Press of Mississippi, Peter Kuper: Conversations.

From the publisher’s description:

Along with two dozen images, this volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper, including a career-spanning lengthy new interview. The book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends Robert Crumb and Vaughn Bode, Mad magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, co-creator of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic Four. These interviews were conducted by Kuper and fellow artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were teenagers.

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From Mr. Kuper’s “New Yorker Cartoonist A-Z” entry on Ink Spill:

Peter Kuper  Born, 1958, Summit, New Jersey.  NYer work: June 6, 2011 – . Website: peterkuper.com  And for more biographical information, visit his Wikipedia page.

Glen Baxter, Ben Katchor, Emily Flake, Michael Maslin at The Brooklyn Book Festival

Posted on 23rd August 2016 in News

BBF 2016

 

New Yorker contributors Ben Katchor, Glen Baxter, Emily Flake and yours truly will be part of the 2016 Brooklyn Book Festival. Here’s a link to the festival’s website.  When there’s further info on the events attached to these folks I’ll post links*

*for starters, here are the details of my participation:

12:00pm Brooklyn Historical Society Auditorium (128 Pierrepont St)

Artists As Influencers. A conversation about how cultural creators both reflect and influence society with biographers Michael Maslin (Peter Arno, The Mad Mad World of the New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist), Nancy Princenthal (Agnes Martin- Her Life and Art), and Mary Louise Patterson, (co-editor of Letters From Langston: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond)

 

Book of Interest: Robert Gottlieb’s Memoir

Posted on 21st August 2016 in News

GootliebHere’s a memoir that’ll sure to be added to Ink Spill‘s library: Robert Gottlieb’s Avid Reader: A Life (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, September 13, 2016).

Anyone following The New Yorker‘s history will no doubt remember the hoopla surrounding Mr. Gottlieb’s appointment as editor of The New Yorker way back in 1987 (he in turn was replaced by Tina Brown in 1992.  She left The New Yorker in 1998, and was replaced by David Remnick).

Here are a few tip of the iceberg cartoon-related snippets from the book. The first concerns his relationship with the then long-time Art/Cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz:

“Cartoonists, like most humorists, are sensitive plants, and Lee had to juggle their needs and feelings in tandem with mine.”

And another where he talks about helping Ms. Brown transition to The New Yorker:

“Once Tina was on the premises, she and her camp setting up camp on another floor from mine, I showed her what ropes she wanted to be shown.  For instance, it didn’t make sense for me to be commissioning cartoons that she might not find funny when they came in finished, so I invited her to join my weekly art meetings with Lee Lorenz and to speak up.  She hardly did, although once she looked at a finished piece of art and asked, “Is it funny?” She wasn’t being sarcastic, she just wanted to know.”

 

 

 

Event of Note: Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer in Conversation, Oct. 20th; More Spills: Al Frueh’s Studio and Paul Noth’s Book News

Posted on 19th August 2016 in News

sorel_feifferCartoon gods Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer will be in conversation on October 20th at the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia.  Mark your calendar!  Details here.

Mr. Sorel’s latest book, Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 is due this October while Mr. Feiffer’s latest, Cousin Joseph, is just out. Both are published by Liveright. 9781631490231_300

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More Spills Icon EditedPaul Noth has signed up for three books with Bloomsbury.  Writing on Facebook about the news, Mr. Noth said: “They’re my favorite thing I’ve ever done.”

And here’s what Publisher’s Weekly had to say:

 

 The illustrated adventure series features Happy Junior, a bearded 10-year-old who wants to be normal but can’t, thanks to his family, including his father, a brilliant inventor whose screwball products are trumpeted in TV infomercials, his five unusual sisters, and his despotic grandmother who has relegated the whole family to a basement corner of her grand estate. The first book in the series, How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens, will be published in winter 2018…

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And from out of left field, this real estate listing for a Greenwich Village townhouse (34 Perry Street) that includes a mention of Al Frueh, who had the first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker.

*New Yorker Minutiae Recollection Award of the year goes to Stephen Nadler, who runs the wonderfully entertaining and informative Attempted Bloggery.  Stephen wrote to me after reading this post and pointed out that this very same studio  was mentioned in that very same inaugural issue under the heading In Our Midst. And here it is:

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From the realtor’s listing:”The fourth floor is exceptional. In 1924, it was transformed into a loft and artist studio by renowned New Yorker cartoonist Mr. Al Frueh with a raised roof and extraordinary large windows and north facing skylight across the entire frontage.”


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Blitt Pencilled; The Tilley Watch…with Mankoff, Eckstein, Flake, Steed & Allenby

Posted on 17th August 2016 in News

tumblr_inline_oc0iv7UAkQ1sj0qh6_500Barry Blitt is the next New Yorker artist sharing the tools of his trade on Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils. Read it here.

 

 

 

 

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Tilley Watch...

“New Yorker Cartoons Past, Present and Future” a talk by Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor will take place at The Museum of The City of New York on September 8th.  All the details here

 

…another cartoonist makes their New Yorker debut in this week’s issue. Kendra Allenby, whose previous work can be found here, is in the issue of August 22. Ms. Allenby is either the 9th or 10th new cartoonist (one of these days I’ll be more definitive) added to the magazine’s stable in the past eight months…

And in case you missed these: Edward Steed’s newyorker.com piece on his travels in ChinaEmily Flake’s  newyorker.com piece on NYC’s L Train closure…and Bob Eckstein’s  illustrations

in the New York Times accompanying the piece “Which Olympic Sport Would You Compete In?”.