New Site of Interest: Weekly Humorist

There’s a relatively new humor site in town: Weekly Humorist, featuring cartoons, humorous writing and podcasts. The WH’s Publisher, Marty Dundics tells the Spill that he’s “…launching a digital tablet weekly issue soon and the site, which has a lot of articles and cartoons from contributors from New Yorker/Shouts & Murmurs, MAD, American Bystander, Funny or Die, McSweeny’s, NY Times, WSJ etc…

…Our tagline is The Satire Magazine. The standard in American immaturity.”

Visit the Weekly Humorist site here!

 

Two Blog Posts of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind & Attempted Bloggery

Two favorite New Yorker-related blogs making for fun Saturday reading.

First, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker with its look at the issue of June 30, 1928 featuring the ever pleasing work of Helen Hokinson on the cover. Work shown in the post: Alice Harvey, Al Frueh, and Peter Arno. 

And then there’s Attempted Bloggery, frequently mentioned on the Spill, and for good reason. Stephen Nadler, who runs the site, tirelessly examines all kinds of New Yorker cartoon and cartoonist related angles (original art, auctions, obscurities, etc). Right now he’s looking at the work of Gregory d’Alessio, a somewhat forgotten figure.  Mr. d’Alessio contributed a handful of covers and one cartoon to The New Yorker

Shown above: on the left is the June 30, 1928 New Yorker. On the right, a drawing by Mr. d’Alessio from the May 1937 issue of College Humor.

The Spill’s A-Z entries for cartoonists mentioned:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

Gregory d’Alessio (Photo above from College Humor, 1938) Born Sept. 25, 1904, NYC. New Yorker work: 1934 -1940.

Al Frueh (pictured above) Born, Lima, Ohio 1880; died, Sharon, Connecticut, 1968. New Yorker work: 1925 – 1962. Here’s a good piece about Mr. Frueh’s life.

 

 

 

Alice Harvey  (above) Born 1894, Austin, Illinois. New Yorker work: Oct. 17th,1925 – May 1, 1943.

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated…and a Bonus; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 16: Steig Remington Rand Shaver Ads:

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

If you like your New Yorker cartoons poked and prodded and looked at this way and that, the Cartoon Companion is for you. This particular CC post comes with a bonus: a look at a rough sketch by New Yorker cartoonist, Amy Hwang.   See it here. 

______________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 16: Steig Remington Rand Shaver Ads

As promised early on in this series, William Steig has returned (and will return again). Here are four ads he did for Remington Electric Shaver, all in 1937. As always, these images are courtesy of Warren Bernard of SPX, who put in all the effort finding, scanning, and then sending everything over to the Spill on an electric silver platter. 

Here’s Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss; Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss

Harry Bliss, a New Yorker contributor since 1998,  will speak at the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History on September 18th.  All the details here.

__________________________________________________________________________

Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation

Gregory d’Alessio, a New Yorker contributor  — he contributed from 1934 – 1940 — who doesn’t get much attention is finally getting some over on Stephen Nadler’s Attempted BloggerySee it here.

________________________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Speaking of an artist who doesn’t get much attention, next up is Abner Dean (the entire series, with the exception of the Absolut ads, courtesy of SPX’s Warren Bernard). All of Mr. Dean’s ads are for the Aetna Insurance Group, and are presented chronologically, clockwise beginning from the upper left, from 1945 -1951.

Mr. Dean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC. According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.” He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gahan Wilson’s New Website; A Mimi Pond Interview; New Case For Pencils with Jeremy Nguyen

Gahan Wilson’s New Website

The one-and-only Gahan Wilson has a new website (this news courtesy of Comics DC’s Mike Rhode, as is the Mimi Pond post below). Link here

__________________________________________________________________________

A Mimi Pond Interview

From Paste, August 22, 2017 — The Customer Is Always Wrong‘s Mimi Pond On Turning Diner Drama into Period Piece Drama” — this interview In conjunction with the release of her new book.  

Link here to Ms. Pond’s website

____________________________________________________________________

New Case For Pencils with Jeremy Nguyen

Jeremy Nguyen is next up on Jane Mattimoe’s always interesting Case For Pencils blog.

See it here!

Link here to Mr. Nguyen’s website

 

 

Profile of Interest: New Yorker Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen; Karasik on Kirby; Chast’s New Book

From Artsy, August 28, 2017, “Meet the Young Woman Deciding the Future of The New Yorker Cartoon”— this enlightening piece on Emma Allen, the magazine’s current Cartoon Editor.

______________________________________________________________________

Paul Karasik, whose How to Read Nancy: The Elements of Comics in Three Easy Panels (co-authored with Mark Newgarden) is coming out this Fall, has contributed a piece to Kirby 100: 100 Top Creators Celebrate Jack Kirby’s Work.  Mr. Karasik tells the Spill :

“I write about Kirby’s somewhat incomprehensible later work. It may be the only time that Kirby has been compared to Frederick Burr Opper.”

____________________________________________________________________

The Washington Post’s Comics Riffs has an article about Roz Chast and her upcoming “Love Letter to New York,” Going Into Town.   Unfortunately, it’s behind the WaPo paywall. Enjoy all you subscribers!

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

I’ve got a piece in the just published “KIRBY 100: 100 Top Creators Celebrate Jack Kirby’s Greatest Work”, honoring Kirby’s upcoming 100th Birthday.

I write about Kirby’s somewhat incomprehensible later work. It may be the only time that Kirby has been compared to Frederick Burr Opper.

The book is edited by John Morrow and Jon B. Cooke.