Karasik Explains “How A Cartoon Is Funny”; Interview of Interest: Mimi Pond

Karasik Explains How A Cartoon Is Funny

Paul Karasik has dissected a New Yorker cartoon or two.  He continues this coming Monday.  Details here.

A Karasik quote of interest from the linked article:

“Despite E.B. White’s famous saying, ‘Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog; few are interested and the frog dies,’ my goal is to explain how a cartoon is funny, how it works its magic on the reader.” _______________________________________________________________________

Interview of Interest: Mimi Pond

From The Muse, August 8, 2017, “A chat with Mimi Pond on the Service Industry, Cocaine, and Writing the First Episode of The Simpsons” — Ms. Pond’s new book is The Customer Is Always Wrong.

An excerpt from Ms. Pond’s book appeared on the newyorker.com ‘s Daily Shouts  August 2.

The Nib Looks at New Yorker Cartoons in 2040; Of Interest: Cartoon Companion’s Frank Cotham Interview, Part 2

The Nib Looks at New Yorker cartoons  in 2040

 

 

 

Here’s an amusing piece from The Nib, August 8, 2017,  “New Yorker 2040” — too bad the author didn’t try imagining various cartoonists styles 23 years from now instead of just using one vaguely  1950s – early 1960s similar style…or is that what’s in store?  Bonus: the zillionth take-off on Steinberg’s iconic New Yorker cover. ________________________________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion’s Frank Cotham Interview, Part 2

Cartoon Companion has posted the second half of its interview with veteran New Yorker cartoonist, Frank Cotham (shown to the left wearing the pointed party hat; this is a cropped screen grab from the Arnold Newman group photo that appeared in the very first Cartoon Issue of The New Yorker, Dec. 15, 1997). To the left of him is Dean Vietor, to the right of Mr. Cotham is Mick Stevens in his customary top hat. That’s Lee Lorenz, lower left, joyously tossing confetti in the air, and Mike Twohy, lower right, tentatively tossing confetti).

Read Part 2 of the CC’s Cotham interview here.

Fave Photo of the Day: Dator & Le Lievre Down Under; Attempted Bloggery on Advertising Work By New Yorker Cartoonists; A Spill Note

Fave Photo of the Day

Here’s Joe Dator, in the land down under with New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Glen Le Lievre, August 2017.

Mr. Dator began contributing toThe New Yorker in 2006.

Mr. Le Lievre began contributing toThe New Yorker in 2004.

 

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Attempted Bloggery On Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists

I’d planned to briefly detour from the Warren Bernard New Yorker cartoonists ad collection that’s been appearing here and show the Absolut ads — all appeared in 1991 —  by a bunch of colleagues (Robert Weber, William Hamilton, Edward Koren, Victoria Roberts, Roz Chast, Jack Ziegler, Mischa Richter, Danny Shanahan, and Lee Lorenz).  I soon discovered that Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery had already done just that in a January 2016 post.  It includes scans of all the ads.  See them here. __________________________________________

A Spill Note

Normally, today’s Spill would consist entirely of The Monday Tilley Watch, but alas, the New Yorker that appeared last week (dated August 7 & 14, 2017) is a double issue, so no new cartoons until next Monday.

 

 

 

 

Books of Interest: The New Yorker Bon Appetit!, Thurber’s Favole Per Il Nostro Tempo, Steinberg’s Passaporto and The New Yorker Book of Katzen Cartoons

I occasionally travel the world without leaving my desk.  In this case a search of New Yorker cartoons on France’s Amazon site turned up this curiosity. Lookin’ sharp, Eustace!

There are plenty of variations on standard New Yorker cartoon collections (many with different covers designs). I wondered what a Thurber  title would look like in Italian and found  Thurber’s Fables For Our Time.

Sometimes, it’s just the translated title that catches my eye, such as the German cover for The New Yorker Book of Cat Cartoons. (hey, who doesn’t like katzen?).

A later edition (in Italian) of Steinberg’s Passport with an eye-catching cover: Passaporto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video of Interest: Chris Ware; Karasik’s Oyster Report; Chast on Library of Congress Panel; Finck’s Neighborhood Cult

Video of Interest: Chris Ware

Here’s a video, “Someone I’m Not” with Chris Ware.  See it here

Mr. Ware has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1999.

 

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Paul Karasik’s Oyster Report

Another of Paul Karasik’s Graphic Reports from  the Vineyard Gazette...this time it’s oysters. Read it here.

Mr. Karasik has also been contributing to The New Yorker since 1999. His latest book (with Mark Newgarden) is How to Read Nancy (Fantagraphics).

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Chast on Library of Congress Panel

Roz Chast will be part of what the Library of Congress’s National Book Festival calls the Graphic Novels Stage. All the details here.  Ms. Chast has contributed to The New Yorker since 1978.  Her upcoming book is called Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York (Bloomsbury). Out in October.

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Finck’s Neighborhood Cult

From newyorker.com’s Daily Shouts, August 3, 2017, Liana Finck’s “A Guide to the Neighborhood Recycling Cults” —

Read it here.

Ms. Finck has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2013.

 

Fairfield County (CT) Cartoonists; E.B. and Katharine White’s Home for Sale; Lots of Peter Arno on Pinterest; William Steig’s Connecticut Home For Sale

Fairfield County Connecticut’s Cartoonists

Here’s a really nice article in Vanity Fair, “When Fairfield County Was the Comic-Strip Capital of The World” written by Cullen Murphy, whose father drew “Prince Valiant” — a number of New Yorker artists show up (as you might expect as the county also had a large concentration of  cartoonists from the magazine…see this link for more on that).

 

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E.B. and Katharine White’s Home For Sale

From Town & Country, this article  — with photos — on the home previously owned by E.B. and Katharine White, now up for sale.

Why is this on Ink Spill, you might ask?  The White’s were major figures in the development of the New Yorker; both intersected with the magazine’s cartoons. One of Mr. White’s many duties at the New Yorker  was tinkering with cartoon captions. The most famous tinkering resulted in the Carl Rose drawing that appeared in the December 8, 1928 New Yorker:spinach

“It’s broccoli, dear.”

“I say it’s spinach, and I say the hell with it.” 

To read a little more about that particular caption, go here.

In the earliest decades of the New Yorker, Katharine White headed the fiction department. The cartoons fell under the fiction department’s umbrella until James Geraghty was appointed in 1939, when a stand alone art department was created.  In his book, The Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995,  the magazine’s former Art Editor, Lee Lorenz wrote of Ms. White: “She remained a powerful voice in the selection of the magazine’s art even after she and her second husband, E. B. White, moved to Maine in the mid-thirties.”

Two recommended biographies: Scott Elledge’s E.B. White: A Biography (Norton, 1984)

and Linda Davis’s Onward and Upward: A Biography of Katharine S. White (Harper & Row, 1987)

And for a wonderful read on that era of the New Yorker: Thomas Vinciguerra’s Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber, And the Golden Age of The New Yorker (W.W. Norton & Co.,  2016)

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A lot of Peter Arno on Pinterest

Billed as “182 Best Peter Arno Images on Pinterest” — it doesn’t disappoint. The post even includes the dummy cover for my Arno biography.

Anyway, it’s fun to see so much Arno in one place. New Yorker cartoons, New Yorker covers, advertisements — all kinds of wonderful art by the master.

 

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William Steig’s Kent Connecticut Home For Sale

Fear not — Ink Spill is not pushing real estate.  It’s just coincidence (or as Curly of the Three Stooges would say, “a coinkydink”) that two homes by three major New Yorker figures are up for sale. This is William Steig’s home in Kent, Connecticut. Read all about the home here.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.