Pretty in Pink: The New Yorker’s 25th Anniversary Album; More Spills: Moore Tweets Out a Ziegler… More Soglow

Judging by what I’ve noticed over many years of visiting used book stores, The New Yorker 25th Anniversary Album must have been the most popular in the series of their cartoon anthologies. This is the one you’re likely to find if you find any at all. Bonus: it’s easily found online for just a few bucks. The Album sports a series of firsts on the cover: the first time a monochrome Eustace Tilley appeared on an Album (the next time he would appear this close to so much solid color was on the magazine’s 60th Anniversary issue.  Then editor, Tina Brown presented Eustace surrounded by, um, gold). 

The 25th Album was the first to reproduce a number of full cartoons on the cover (minus the captions, which due to the size of each cartoon shown, would’ve been virtually impossible to read without a magnifying glass. The exception is John Held, Jr.’s work where the text is within the piece).  And it was the first to be divided into sections: The Late Twenties, The Early Thirties, The Late Thirties, The Early Forties, and The Late Forties.

All the big names are here, of course, and so are some of the most memorable cartoons in the magazine’s history, including Thurber’s Seal in the Bedroom, Addams’ skier, and Arno’s “Well, back to the old drawing board.”  This is the Album for anyone who has heard about the New Yorker‘s Golden Age, and wants to know what all the fuss was about.

The design of the book is excellent, with paper of good quality, allowing for Gluyas Williams’ masterpieces, run full page, to glow.  Arno’s brushstrokes look as if he just swept them across the page fifteen minutes ago. On the pages where a number of cartoons appear, the layout is handled with great care, never too busy; each page was obviously fussed over by someone (or someones) who knew what they were doing. Just look at the graphic balancing act directly below:

The contributors are a Who’s Who of the magazine’s pantheon of great artists, including the founders, and the ones who showed up while Harold Ross was still messing around with the ingredients.  Steig’s Small Fry are here, as is Soglow’s Little King.  Helen Hokinson’s Club Ladies are generously presented, as are spreads by Rea Irvin, and and and…gee willikers, so much more (to see more scroll down to the back cover’s list of artists).  This is one of the very best Albums of cartoons the magazine ever produced (as another 67 years have passed since its publication it shares the top shelf with a few others). 

The flap text (above) reminds us that the cartoons are a record of the times. I’ll go along with that. As the magazine moves closer to its 100th year it’s essential for the cartoons to change with the times and reflect the times. I expect that the Introduction to The New Yorker’s 100th Anniversary Album will express something close to that sentiment, if not exactly that.

If you’ve read Genius In Disguise, Thomas Kunkel’s great biography of Harold Ross, you might remember that book’s prologue has a wonderful section devoted to the party at the Ritz-Carleton celebrating the New Yorker‘s 25th Anniversary. It was a party, wrote Kunkel, “celebrating accomplishment, about creating something of enduring importance.”  

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Michael Moore Tweeted out a drawing this morning by the late Jack Ziegler that’s right on the money (so to speak):

— My thanks to Bruce Eric Kaplan for bringing this to the Spill’s attention.

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…A lot More Soglow

Attempted Bloggery has posted a cart full of rare Otto Soglow drawings (some of them are what used to be referred to as “naughty” — nowadays we’d call them not-PC. ) 

 

 

Interviews of Interest: Roz Chast, Jason Adam Katzenstein; The Tilley Watch Online

Interview : Roz Chast

From The Rumpus, November 30, 2017, “The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #122: Roz Chast”

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Interview: Jason Adam Katzenstein

From jewcy.com, December 1, 2017, “Cartooning’s Jewish Je Ne Sais Quoi”

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…This past week’s Daily featured a slightly animated cyber drawing by Sharon Levy; a media-centric drawing by Emily Flake, and lotsa politics, from David Sipress, Brendan Loper and Kaamran Hafeez.  Elsewhere (Daily Shouts, for instance): a piece by Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, and Liana Finck (the second of her advice pieces).

I note that the New Yorker is up to at least five official Instagram accounts: newyorkerart, newyorkermag, newyorkercartoons, newyorkerphoto, newyorkerpromo…have fun!

…and don’t forget these official New Yorker Facebook pages: The New Yorker Magazine, The New Yorker Radio Hour, and The New Yorker Cartoons (the latter carries an icon by an illustrator, not a cartoonist…go figure). 

 

 

Interview of Interest: Kim Warp; Cartoon Companion Reviews Latest New Yorker Cartoons; PR: Blitt Speaks with Studio 360; Applause Applause: Karasik & Newgarden’s NYTs How To Read Nancy Review; Opp Art Launch, Kuper’s World War 3 Illustrated Release Party, Arroyo’s Unnatural Election

Interview of Interest: Kim Warp

From The Q&A with APC,  November 28, 2017: “Episode 32 — Kim Warp”

Visit Ms. Warp’s website

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The Cartoon Companion Reviews the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

This week’s cartoons, rated from 1 to 6 (6 being the tops, 1 being the opposite of the tops) courtesy of “Max” and “Simon” — see it all here.

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From Slate, November 30, 2017, “New Yorker Cover illustrator Barry Blitt” Interviewed by Studio 360.

Hear the interview here.

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The Sunday New York Times Book Review has very nice things to say about Paul Karasik & Mark Newgarden’s How To Read Nancy. Read it hereCongrats to Messrs. Karasik and Newgarden!

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Release Party for World War 3 Illustrated…Opp Art Launch…Unnatural Election

World War 3 was founded in 1979 by Seth Tobocman and New Yorker cartoonist, Peter Kuper. All the below copy appears on Facebook’s Events page :

Tuesday December 5, 7pm at the SVA Amphitheater; 209 East 23rd Street, room: 311 —Join us in celebrating the release of comic book anthology World War 3 Illustrated Issue # 48 “Fight Fascism!”


—Also making its debut: the recent launch of the daily political art website: “Opp Art” -sponsored by The Nation magazine, Opp Art posts powerful artistic reactions from around the world five days a week. and Unnatural Election International artists from fine artists to illustrators respond to the 2016 election -curated by Andrea Arroyo
—Come see live comic book readings, art performances, and presentations by contributors to all these projects.

 

Tom Chitty Tells the Spill Why “7” and Not “6”; Upcoming Swann Auction Includes An Abundance of New Yorker Cartoon Art; Applause Applause: Ed Steed is a Grammy Nominee

Tom Chitty Tells the Spill Why “7” and Not “6”

In this past Monday Tilley Watch, I wrote the following about the Tom Chitty drawing above:

  Mr. Chitty went at this head-on which almost (almost) makes the fellows in the line-up look like they in a painting or photo on the wall. Maybe they are, but I don’t think so. I wondered why it was possibly a #7 missing from the line-up and not #6.

Mr, Chitty was kind enough to respond, and to send along a rough sketch of his drawing:

I thought you might be interested in an answer your question about my cartoon this week.  I’ve attached the original scribble of the idea — at that point there were only four crooks, but that felt too few, so I added one. The simple answer, as to why seven and not six is that it sounded funnier to me. Maybe it’s because seven is made of two syllables. I confess it was not a particularly long deliberation!

— To see more of Mr. Chitty’s work, visit his website here.

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Upcoming Swann Auction Features An Abundance of New Yorker Cartoon Art

Swann’s December 14th auction includes a number of cartoon originals by the following New Yorker artists: Steinberg, Charles Addams, Abe Birnbaum, Peter Arno, Charles Barsotti, George Booth, Robert Day, R.O. Blechman, Arthur Getz, Theodore Haupt, Anatol Kovarsky, Marcellus Hall, Arnie Levin, Charles E. Martin (CEM), Joe Mirachi, Reginald Massie, Frank Modell, James Stevenson, Tom Toro, Richard Taylor, Harry Brown, Otto Soglow, Ronald Searle, Edward Koren, Jules Feiffer, and John Held, Jr.. Wow!

 — My thanks to Tom Toro for bringing the catalog to my attention.

View the entire catalog here.

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Applause Applause: Ed Steed Is a Grammy Nominee

Ed Steeds Father John Misty cover art (above) has been nominated for a Grammy.  Read about it here.  Congrats to Mr. Steed!

A Canadian New Yorker?; The Not Yorker?; The Surreal McCoy’s Graphic Novel; Peter Kuper In Conversation at the New School; Liza Donnelly: A Funny Sea Change; New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor to Speak at Yale

A Canadian New Yorker?

From CBC News (Montreal), November 26, 2017, “Le Montrealer Imagines a Local Take on The New Yorker’s Covers” — this interesting piece on a Canadian exhibition of New Yorker inspired work. With a related piece on  similarly inspired exhibits.

   

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The Not Yorker?

From Artsy, November 28, 2017,  “The Website Giving Rejected New Yorker Covers a Second Chance” —   Read about it here.

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The Surreal McCoy’s Upcoming Graphic Novel

From Bleeding Cool, November 28, 2017, “A New Yorker Cartoonist Explores Her Iraqi/Jewish Roots in Comics — The Wolf of Baghdad”

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Jose Munoz & Peter Kuper in Conversation

In a Special New York Comics and Picture-story Symposium,  Peter Kuper will be in conversation with Jose Munoz this Thursday at the New School. Details here.

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Liza Donnelly: A Funny Sea Change

From Medium, November 28, 2017, “A Funny Sea Change: One Step Forward in the Field of Humor” Liza Donnelly‘s take on this week’s historic issue of The New Yorker.

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New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor to Speak at Yale

From Yale News, November 28, 2017, “Cartoon editor at the New Yorker to discuss ‘Laugh Lines'” …details here on Emma Allen’s talk this coming Thursday.

 

A Moose in The Hoose; Material Goods: The New Yorker Diary 2018 & Tilley Pins

A Moose In The Hoose

Here’s a fun looking book I ran into online yesterday.  Had never seen or heard of it before.  The author, Frank Sullivan, and illustrator, George Price, are familiar, of course. Mr. Price had quite a side career as an illustrator (the Spill library has a number of the books he illustrated, but not this one).

I believe that Mr. Price was the New Yorker‘s most prolific artist interpreter — that is to say, he never worked from his own ideas but relied entirely on writers.*  My source on this is Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s former art editor (and later cartoon editor), who was Mr. Price’s editor for nearly twenty years.

* The exception was Mr. Price’s one New Yorker cover (below), which, obviously, was caption-less. What a beauty!

 

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z including the cover of a Spill favorite collection of his, published in 1977:

Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. He contributed nearly 1300 cartoons to the New Yorker.

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Material Goods

Perhaps this should’ve been mentioned in yesterday’s Monday Tilley Watch… but it wasn’t. Several ads in this week’s New Yorker are worth noting.  The first is for the magazine’s wonderful yearly diary.  It’s usually loaded with cartoons. The ad copy says there’s “a cartoon on every page”…hmmm, I think the example shown in the ad, and the samples shown on the magazine’s store contradict that, but whatever. There are always plenty of cartoons,  meaning it might be the closest thing we’ve had as an annual collection these past many decades.

The other ad, headlined A Dash Of New Yorker Style , is for some of the stuff that is sold on the magazine’s “official store”; as one who is a sucker for anything Tilley, I think the keepers here are the Eustace Tilley pin and the butterfly that is usually fluttering just off of Eustace’s nose.

Below: the ads in this week’s New Yorker: