Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 27: Frank Beaven; Tilley Watch Online

If you search for Frank Beaven online (as I recently have) a variety of work shows up, from “girlie” magazine covers to advertising work to New Yorker appearances (he contributed 15 cartoons to the magazine between 1933 and 1946). Here’s a slight auto-biographical piece and self-portrait he contributed to the 1941 collection, Colliers Collects Its Wits. Below that are three ads by Mr. Beaven, all courtesy of Warren Bernard: Eveready (1943), Zippo (1946), and  B.F. Goodrich (1946).

Below: another Eveready ad from the website, Hairy Green Eyeball, where you can find a nice collection of more Eveready ads by Mr. Beaven as well as by various cartoonists. 

Below:  another Zippo ad (from 1942) This one from a Zippo-centric website.

Another auto-biographical piece and self-portrait, along with a New Yorker drawing ( it appeared in the issue of March 13, 1943) from the Best Cartoons of the Year 1943:

More info:

  1. Here’s Mr. Beaven’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Franklin (Frank) Beaven Born, Lebanon, Indiana, c.1905. Died Allendale, New Jersey, 1975. New Yorker work: May 20, 1933 – March 2, 1946. Beaven also wrote articles for the old Life , and Judge. Besides The New Yorker, his cartoons appeared in Colliers, The Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, and others.

2. The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum posted this piece about Mr. Beaven back in 2012.

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…this week’s Daily cartoon featured a senator’s eye exam (executed by David Sipress), fallen dynamos, uh, I mean dominoes courtesy of Kim Warp; a plugged-in Little Mermaid by Jeremy Nguyen; an axe-wielding President by Peter Kuper, and headlines in the morning news(paper) from Kim Warp. Daily Shouts pieces included two cartoon colleagues: Colin Tom (“Trump’s Desert-Island Sand Trap”) and Ellis Rosen (“Make Your Own G.O.P. Tax Bill”).    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

“Max” & “Simon” have returned with a close look at the cartoons in this week’s New Yorker (the issue with the Christmas trees in the subway). They discuss a shaved Santa, remind us what “DEFCON” means, talk about ships alongside desert islands, discuss bakeries, and a poetic policeman. 

And…along with some 5s, they hand out a few 1s this time around (they rate the work from 1 to 6, with 6 being tops). 

Also on the site: notice that part 1 of an interview with Joe Dator will appear next week.  Looking forward to that!

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 26: Steinberg (Pt.2)

Here’s a quartet of Steinberg ads (the second Steinberg set in this series), all courtesy of Warren Bernard, cartoon collector extraordinaire.

Not surprisingly, three of these ads are from when Steinberg was just beginning his New Yorker run (he began contributing in 1941).  The first shown here though is from 1966. It could easily have run in The New Yorker as a drawing (oh, let’s face it: any of these would’ve worked as stand alone New Yorker art).  Schweppes ad: 1950; H&G: 1948; Comptometer: 1945

Liniers, the Musician; PR: More Nancy, More Blitt; Bob Eckstein’s Daily News Op-Ed

Liniers, the  Musician

“The Argentine Cartoonist Who Moonlights As A Rock Nerd” — a piece about Liniers, the fellow responsible for the above 2016 anniversary cover. Read it here

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More Nancy, More Blitt

From the Vineyard Gazette, “When Brevity  Underscores Genius, A Good Laugh Is Around the Corner”  — a piece on Karasik & Newgarden’s How To Read NancyRead it here.

…And here’s an interview with  Barry Blitt on The Roundtable on WAMC in Albany.  Mr. Blitt is on tour promoting his anthology, Blitt. Listen here.

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Bob Eckstein’s New York Daily News Op-Ed

Mr. Eckstein‘s latest Op-ed piece in the Daily News. Read it here.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of December 11, 2017; Event of Note: “How To Read Nancy” Authors at The Society of Illustrators; A “More Spills” Correction Re: Jack Ziegler

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

Up above, in red, I use the word “meandering”; after this morning’s look- through of the new issue  I double-checked my usage.  “Aimless” is a good part of the definition (as I sensed when I first used the word “meandering” to describe the Tilley Watch) — as in “aimlessly moving through” something or someplace.  Aimlessly wandering through is exactly what the Monday Tilley Watch is all about.  It’s not a critique of the cartoons (or drawings as traditionalists refer to them), although there’s sometimes a critical ‘tude lurking within the paragraphs.

I wander through each issue as I might wander through a bakery or book store, appreciating this or that and ignoring that or this.  You never know as you pass by books or baked goods what might attract you — plenty of it is just a blur.   And so it was with this new issue. This is a different Monday Tilley Watch because I’m not going to go drawing by drawing, I’m only going to mention a few things I saw that attracted me.  Just like at a bakery, these are the things I might think about for a  while once I’ve walked out of the store. For instance, I’m still thinking about these cookies I saw yesterday in our local supermarket’s bakery:

And now on to the issue: first, the “spot drawings”;  I’ve not mentioned spots much, if at all.  They tell a story (a modern thing: they didn’t through most of the magazine’s history) but admittedly I don’t follow the stories they tell.  I look at them as I page through the magazine and if they’re pleasing I note that they are. I find this issue’s spot drawings exceptionally pleasing (again, I didn’t follow the story being told).  But story or no story, they’re lovely. The spot artist is Clo’e Floirat

Also of note are Tom Bachtell‘s Talk of the Town drawings.  I’ve mentioned him before, and with good reason.  His work is a welcome modern tradition.

Among this weeks cartoonists is Jon Adams who(m?) I owe an apology to.  I noted last week that he was making his debut (with the Michelin Man drawing).  Wrong. He made his debut this Fall in the October 2nd issue of The New Yorker.  In the Spill‘s ongoing count of Emma Allen’s newbies (Ms. Allen is the magazine’s cartoon editor) Mr. Adams is one of 8 cartoonists introduced in 8 months.  Slightly keeping ahead of the average of one newbie a month, there are two debuts in this issue:  Mary Lawton and Maggie Mull, who are  Ms. Allen’s 9th and 10th new cartoonists. (sorry, I cannot find a website for either cartoonist. Please let me know if either or both have one).  If 10 sounds like a lot of new creative blood we should remember that her predecessor introduced approximately 130 cartoonists. 

Here for the record are this week’s cartoonists:

Ps:  what I wish I did see as I looked through the issue is Rea Irvin’s classic masthead for The Talk of The Town (shown below). Alas, it’s been shuffled off to Buffalo, or wherever classic mastheads are shuffled off to. 

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Event of Note: How To Read Nancy Authors at The Society of Illustrators

Paul Karasik & Mark Newgarden join Columbia’s Karen Green at The Society.  Details here!

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A More Spills Correction

My colleague,  Joe Dator has Tweeted a correction to the  Jack Ziegler drawing mentioned here yesterday.

Here’s Mr. Dator’s Tweet: