Between You & Me &… Eustace Tilley; Peter Steiner’s Hopeless But Not Serious on ICE; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

Between You & Me &…Eustace Tilley

Here’s a fascinating addition to the Spill‘s archives: the Korean edition of Mary Norris‘s truly wonderful book, Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen. As you can see it sports Rea Irvin’s iconic cover from the New Yorker‘s inaugural issue. This usage of the cover is, to my knowledge, a first (Ms. Norris told me the cover came as “a complete surprise” to her). As you see below, Mr. Irvin’s clouds and green vertical border (the “strap”) were carried around on the back cover as well.  

 

Below: the US cover of Between You & Me (Norton, 2015), and to the right, the paperback edition. You’ll note that these covers use an adapted Irvin typeface. 

Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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Peter Steiner’s Hopeless But Not Serious on ICE

The great New Yorker cartoonist and author, Peter Steiner weighs in on ICE and children. See it here. 

Mr. Steiner’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Peter Steiner (above). Born, Cincinnati, 1940. New Yorker work: 1979 – . Collection: “I Didn’t Bite the Man, I Bit the Office” ( 1994).  Mr. Steiner is responsible for one of the most famous (and most republished) New Yorker cartoons in modern times, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” (published July 5, 1993).  An indication of its enduring popularity in our culture:  a wikipedia page is devoted to it.   He has also had novels published, as well as the limited edition “An Atheist in Heaven.” Website: www.plsteiner.com/

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

If it’s Friday then it’s time for the Cartoon Companion’s latest look at the brand new drawings in this week’s issue (June 25, 2018). Joe Dator’s colorful Abe Lincoln drawing is awarded the CC‘s Top Toon ribbon, and rightfully so!  Read the post here.

Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cover Exhibit Of Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics; Addams Hometown Throws Addams Fest in October

 Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Upcoming New Yorker covers are usually posted early Monday morning, but occasionally we get an advance look.  Barry Blitt is the cover artist for next week’s issue. 

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Exhibit Of  Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics

Opening today at the New York Transit Museum in downtown Brooklyn, this fabulous exhibit  comprised of “satirical cartoons, comic strips and comic books from the 19th to 21st centuries.” Works by over 120 artists are represented including the following New Yorker contributors: Roz Chast, Peter Kuper, Eric Drooker, Ben Katchor, Julia Wertz, and Art Young.  Along with the art, there will be panel discussions, gallery talks and sketch nights.

For all the info go here.

(cartoon courtesy of Peter Kuper)

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Addams Hometown Throws  Addams Fest in October

Mark your calendar: Charles Addams’ hometown will hold its first Addams Fest over three days in October (26, 27, and 28). Lectures, exhibits and screenings are planned.  Read about it here.

Above: a screen shot of a very short teaser video for the fest.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Carolita Johnson’s “A Woman’s Work”; Chast’s Work in Vermont

 

A Longreads of interest: A Woman’s Work: Home Economics* (*I Took Woodworking Instead)

— this auto-biographical piece by New Yorker cartoonist, Carolita Johnson.  Ms. Johnson began contributing to the magazine in 2003. 

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Exhibit of Interest: Chast at BMAC

From the Rutland Herald, June 16, 2018, “Five new exhibits open at BMAC” — this news of an exhibit of work by Roz Chast at Vermont’s Brattleboro Museum and Art Center. Ms. Chast began contributing to the New Yorker in 1978.

 

Library of Congress Mini-Slide Show of Interest; A Humor Editors Round-Up; Better Scans From the New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

The Library of Congress has a very brief slide show up (four images) tied to its new publication and exhibit, Drawn to Purpose. Above, Ethel Plummer’s June 1914 cover for Vanity Fair.

See the rest of the work here.

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A Humor Editors Round-up

From The Writer, June 18, 2018,  “The lords and ladies of LOL. Inside the minds of America’s top humor editors”— the piece includes the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen. 

— My thanks to author and New Yorker cartoonist, Bob Eckstein for alerting the Spill to this piece.

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Better Scans from the New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Yesterday I posted some mighty small scans from the upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons.  Here are two larger images (one courtesy of Mr. Attempted Bloggery, Stephen Nadler).

Stylish packaging…can’t wait to see what more is inside. Especially curious to see how the two volumes incorporate the advertised 3000 cartoons (or “classic images” as the publisher calls them).  Actually, since we now can see 3 classic images (below), curious to see how the other 2997 are incorporated. 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 25, 2018; A Few Images Posted from the Upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Noted that this week’s cover (above right) is by Harry Bliss, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoonists.  Noted because the majority of the magazine’s covers were once handled by its cartoonists (somewhat more than 60% a year by my iffy calculations). The number of cartoonists contributing covers these days can be counted on one hand: Mr. Bliss, Roz Chast, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Danny Shanahan, and George Booth.

The change came, as so many changes did, with the arrival of Tina Brown as editor in 1992.  At a meeting of cartoonists called by Ms. Brown just before she took the reigns as editor of The New Yorker, a bunch of us sat around a large table in an upstairs conference room at the fabled Algonquin. Arriving late (Amtrak issues), I sat next to then art editor Lee Lorenz and asked him what I’d missed.  He leaned over and whispered, “She’s going to bring in a lot of illustrators.” He then added something else, which you’ll have to wait to read in my memoir.

Some of Mr. Bliss’s cover has that Hitchcockian “Rear Window” feel to it; the structure of the cartoon (using balconies) has been put to good use by a few cartoonists over the years. Here’s an example that readily came to mind: a Liza Donnelly drawing that appeared in the January 20, 2014 New Yorker:

To read what Mr. Bliss had to say about his cover, go to this mini-interview here on  newyorker.com.

From the Depart of Just Sayin’:  The number of illustrations in this issue outweigh (in space) the number of cartoons appearing.  Sixteen illustrations (not including Tom Bachtell’s wonderful drawings that are laced through the Talk of The Town). Three of the sixteen are full page. Seventeen cartoons this week, one a full page by Liana Finck

The sizing of cartoons in this issue is generally very good. Most every drawing  gets some breathing room (just one is shoe-horned into a tight space).  

Three drawings noted: Ben Schwartzs bargain hunter’s mounted big game is fun. Charles Addams had a field day with this scenario throughout his spectacular New Yorker run.  Here’s one example .

Love Edward Koren‘s restaurant drawing. Some New Yorker drawings are referred to as evergreens — they always work, no matter the year, the trends, the political landscape, the whatever. Mr. Koren’s drawing is an evergreen.

The Spill‘s candidate for New Yorker drawing of the year (thus far) is Joe Dator‘s Abe Lincoln cartoon. (You can find it here on the magazine’s slideshow of the current issue’s cartoons. It’s number 13.)  When Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor was asked why his magazine did not run color cartoons his response was, “What’s so funny about red?”* Mr. Dator’s drawing is a perfect example of what is funny about pink and orange, and yellow, and green and purple.

Spill round of applause for the above drawings.

*The New Yorker did run one color drawing in Ross’s time, Rea Irvin’s two page color spread, The Maharajah of Puttyput Receives a Christmas Necktie From the Queen. It was in the issue of December 12, 1925.

Still missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk of The Town masthead. Here’s a Spill piece about its disappearance and replacement.

This is what the real thing looks like:

 

 — See you next week

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A Few Images Posted From the Upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

The above from the publisher’s website. Well it’s not much, but it’s better than nuthin’.  I could only get the middle image to open up for a better view. Will post more when there’s more to post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s First Father’s Day Cover

I took a moment to look up when Father’s Day began and found it wasn’t officially designated as a nationwide event until 1972 ( footnote: the first Father’s Day was celebrated in Washington state on June 19, 1910).  A quick look through the must-have Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) led me to the above beauty, dated June 15, 1987, by one of the magazine’s cartoon gods, the great Edward Koren.  Surprising that the magazine took so long to tie-in Dad’s Day with a cover? Yes, and no. It’s entirely possible there’s an earlier non-official Father’s Day New Yorker cover, but the day’s more than half-done and the blank page awaits.

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Personal History: David Sipress & His Father & Baseball

In the spirit of the day here’s a brand new piece on newyorker.com , “My Father and Sandy Koufax” by the cartoonist, David Sipress.