Exhibit of Interest: Not OK: Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough; Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons; The Tilley Watch: Lillian Ross

Exhibit of Interest: Not OK

From the New York Times, September 21, 2017,  “The New Yorker Said No, But These Cartoons Just May Make Your Day” — this piece on tomorrow’s sure-to-be-fun show of rejected work. 

So what is an “OK”?  It’s what every cartoonist submitting to The New Yorker hopes to see in their inbox at the end of the week (sent by the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen).  A drawing that has been OKed is a drawing that has been bought by the New Yorker

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Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC boys (they call themselves “Max” and “Simon”) are back with a look at the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.  Among the cartoons dissected are those featuring  beans, huddled football players, big shoes, E.T., and a hot air balloon.  I don’t always see eye-to-eye (or cartoon-to-cartoon) with many of their evaluations, but that’s part of the fun.  Read it all here.

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Word went out yesterday that Lillian Ross, long time contributor to The New Yorker had passed away at age 99.  Ms. Ross began her New Yorker career in 1945, and continued publishing there until 2012 (on the magazine’s blog). Her last piece in the print magazine, according to her New York Times obit, was 2011. 

Here’s a link to the Times obit.

And here’s a link to Rebecca Mead’s “Postscript” on Ms. Ross on the magazine’s website. 

On a personal note, my interactions with Ms. Ross were always interesting.  I first met her at a New Yorker party back in December of 1999.  I summoned up my courage to walk over and introduce myself when I noticed she was sitting by herself at a small round-top table right behind me. I was on a mission in those years to interview everyone at the magazine who possibly could have known Peter Arno.  She looked puzzled at first as I approached, but she broke into a grin when I mentioned I was working on a biography of Arno.  She invited me to sit with her, and immediately launched into a wonderful very short Arno tale (it went into the Arno biography —  she repeated the story elsewhere in print). In short, she was at the big party held (in February of 1952) to celebrate William Shawn’s official appointment as Harold Ross’s successor. Peter Arno, in attendance, asked Ms. Ross if she wanted a ride home. Mr. Shawn leaned over to her and whispered in her ear, “He’s dangerous.” 

  Some weeks after I’d introduced myself to Ms. Ross we were on the phone discussing all sorts of New Yorker “stuff”– but mostly Mr. Shawn’s feelings (according to her) about the magazine’s cartoons and cartoonists in general.   “Ask me anything about what went on,” she said to me — “I know a lot.”

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