Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.; More Booth!

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.

I know, I know… you woke up this morning wondering if John Held, Jr., who became famous for his drawings of flappers in and on the cover of the pre-Luce Life ever did advertising work.  Well courtesy of Warren Bernard‘s detective work, we have some examples of Mr. Held’s commercial work. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for sharing his findings with Ink Spill.

New Yorker readers who have dipped into the magazine’s cartoon anthologies or looked through ancient issues would certainly have come across Mr. Held’s work — but it wasn’t the style that brought him fame. His New Yorker work looks like this:

  Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor (who met Held in high school when they both worked on the school newspaper,The Red and Black)  wanted Held in his new magazine, but he didn’t want Held’s famous flapper style work. According to Thomas Kunkel, in his magnificent biography of Ross, Genius in Disguise:

“Ross and [Rea] Irvin eschewed his [Held’s] overexposed flappers, instead publishing his contemporary twists on the Gay Nineties woodcuts Ross had loved as a boy.”

So what you see here are examples of Held’s non-New Yorker style. The Ovington Gift Shop ad was published during the heart of the Roaring 20s (1926), and the others were published in 1929 — the year that ended so badly.

Here’s John Held, Jr.’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

John Held, Jr. (Pictured above. Source: Sketchbook of American Humorists, 1938) Born, January 10, 1889, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died, 1958, Belmar, New Jersey. New Yorker work: April 11, 1925 – Sept. 17, 1932.

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More Booth!

Mike Lynch and Jane Mattimoe have posted pieces about the wonderful George Booth exhibit at The Society of Illustrators.  The exhibit, as you can see in the poster, is up now and will run through the end of this year. Do not miss!

 

 

 

New Gahan Wilson Collection: “Rejects”; A Cartoon Companion Two-fer: Mick Stevens Interview + the CC’s Take on the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Cavna on Sikoryak’s Trump Book; PR: Blitt, Chast

New Gahan Wilson Collection: “Rejects”

From the publisher:

This is a collection of new cartoons by Gahan Wilson. Never before seen cartoons by the Master of the Macabre will delight your senses.

Available now on Mr. Wilson’s website here.

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A Cartoon Companion Two-fer: Mick Stevens Interview (Pt.2) and the CC’s Take on the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Here’s Part 2 of the Cartoon Companion‘s Mick Stevens Interview, and here’s a link to their dissection of the cartoons appearing in the issue of November 6th.

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Cavna on Sikoryak’s Trump Book

From Michael Cavna’s Washington Post Comic Riffs blog, “The Unquotable Trump’ uses the president’s own words to comic effect” 

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…From the Litchfield County Times (Connecticut), November 2, 2017 “See Cartoonist Barry Blitt at booksigning in Roxbury.”–November 18th

…Roz Chast, whose latest book is Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York,  will appear November 9th for a “craft talk” at the University of Albany. She’ll be joined by a former New Yorker editor.  Details here. 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Live; Obscure Otto Soglow; Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine; Drawing Dogs w/ Booth

New Yorker Cartoonists Live

Event of interest tomorrow night! This just posted on Instagram a few hours ago by the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen:

 Emily Flake, Jeremy Nguyen and Farley Katz will join Ms. Allen at Dover Street Market. Somebody who’s going please take photos and send to the Spill.

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Obscure Otto Soglow

Stephen Nadler, over at Attempted Bloggery, has posted a rarity: an Otto Soglow cover for Broadcasting: The Weekly News Magazine of Radio, dated March 24, 1941.  Above is a snippet.  To see the whole thing go here.

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Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine

It’s a long way off (due out in May of 2018) but here’s the cover for a collection of cartoons about Maine by Maine cartoonists, edited by Mike Lynch.

 The contributors: Bill Woodman, David Jacobson, John Klossner, Mike Lynch, and Jeff Pert

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Drawing Dogs with Booth

From The Paris Review, “Drawing Dogs in George Booth’s Living Room”  — this fun piece about Sandra Boynton drawing with Mr. Booth.

 

 

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween; Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”; Tom Toro in The Paris Review; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush; Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist?

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween

From Liza Donnelly, Halloween drawings for CBS This MorningSee them here

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Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”

From Poynter, October 31, 2017 —“Satirist Andy Borowitz Explains the Fine Art of Lampooning Trump” —  the interview by James Warren includes this quote from Mr. Borowitz describing his work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker Cartoon.”

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Tom Toro in The Paris Review

Tom Toro will be illustrating one sentence at a time for The Paris Review in an eight part series,  The Complete Sentence.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush

Thanks to the generosity of Warren Bernard, the series of New Yorker cartoonists advertising work continues on. Here are four Sani-Flush ads by the great Charles Addams (it being Halloween you just know that Mr. Addams would turn up here on the Spill).  All these ads are dated 1942.

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Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist

From Escapeintolife.com, “Toon Musings: Saul Steinberg / Artiste or Grubby Cartoonist”

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The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of November 6, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 I think it’s safe to say we have in our hands this week the New Yorker’s official Fall issue what with John Cuneo‘s beautiful giant leaf descending cover. 

For a change, I looked through this week’s issue (the digital issue, of course) on my laptop instead of on my tablet. It’s helpful seeing everything in an immediately readable format instead of having to zoom in, but it also removes a layer of mystery I’ve come to enjoy: seeing the cartoons small, and trying to figure out (sometimes) who did them and guessing what the caption might be. Back to the tablet next week.

Skipping through the front of the magazine, I did pause to admire the illustration on page six by Roman Muradov. It sort of has a Arthur Getz and Eugene Mihaesco mash-up feel — a 1960-ish vibe.  Nice.

Passing by the “redraw” of Rea Irvin‘s  iconic never-shoulda-been-replaced Talk of The Town masthead (above) we get to the first cartoon on page 22, a couple of beavers, courtesy of Kaamran Hafeez.  One of the beavers suffers from an age-old problem that was used to great effect on The Mary Tyler Moore Show when  newsman Ted Baxter read, on air: “I’ve just been handed a bulletin: ‘You have something on your front tooth!'” Curious about whether there was any significance to running a beaver drawing now, I consulted Wikipedia for a snap education. The entry included this:“Maintenance work on the dam and lodges is particularly heavy in autumn.”

Here’s a photo of a beaver, just because:

 Five pages later is a Zach Kanin drawing of a fitting room. I like the louvered fitting room doors, which could easily double for those steel roll-down gates you see on storefronts. Below left: Kanin louvered door.  Right: steel roll-down gate.

Eight pages later a Paul Noth mobster-tinged bar scene based on  “if a tree falls in the forest…” Nice expression on the woodsman’s face.  Good caption. Four pages later an Ed Steed drawing (i.e., dark). Shades of Charles Addams’ kids home from camp drawing

On the very next page, Julia Suits takes us out west to the reliable compound of cowboys at a campfire plus modern technology (I’ve done it myself a few times — it’s an irresistible scenario). Can’t see a cowboy campfire without thinking about Mel Brooks’ classic scene. Three pages later an interesting garage drawing by Ellis Rosen. One of our grandmasters, George Booth did a number of memorable garage drawings. Here’s one (published in the issue of December 28, 1998):

Mr. Booth has had a lot of company over the years. Mr. Ellis gives us a lovely drawing with an excellent caption. And, bonus: it sits well on the page. An Amy Kurzweil drawing is on the very next page.  A chess scenario, perfectly timed for Halloween. I like this drawing, but did find myself pondering why the chess pieces have arms. Are these actual chess pieces dressed up for Halloween, or are they people dressed up in chess pieces for Halloween who have decided to further Halloween-ize their chess costumes? So many questions…

Five pages later a Roz Chast triptych (her preferred construct in recent years). The third panel is a gem.

Six pages later, a Sara Lautman drawing leaning heavily on a pun. Five pages later, appearing just a day after International Cat Day, is an Amy Hwang cat drawing. If you want even more cartoon cat drawings, find these somewhere online or in your favorite used book store:

Five pages later, veteran Mick Stevens brings us back to much earlier times. I’m aware of the cartoon takes of Moses passing by a burning bush (hmmm, that was him, wasn’t it?) and him famously getting hold of the tablets containing the Ten Commandments. But the Biblical-era press conference is new to me.  I note that Moses looks weary.

Three pages later another cartoonist trope: the wedding scene. This one’s by Emily Flake. Understanding the definition of the word “algorithm” as used in the caption is key to understanding this drawing.  Someone should really do a book of New Yorker  dating/mating/algorithm related drawings (there was a dating cartoon in the magazine two weeks ago).

Four pages later, the last drawing in the issue (not counting the caption contest work): a banana peel domestic situation via J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein). The only thing as funny as someone slipping on a banana peel is someone getting slapped with a pie in the face. Danny Shanahan gave us both:

To see a slideshow of all the cartoons in this week’s issue, go here to the Cartoons page of newyorker.com and scroll down past the Daily Cartoon, Caption Contest to Cartoons from the Issue.

–See you next Monday

 

 

 

   

 

 

James Thurber: “What Do You People Really Want, Anyway?”

Last Sunday the 6th New Yorker Album was in this spot — today it’s The 5th New Yorker Album, published in 1932. It’s a heck of a lot of fun to look through and it has a bonus: the Foreward is by James Thurber. In 1932 he was in top form as a cartoonist and writer, as well as one of the magazine’s stars. Rereading his Foreword this rainy Fall morning I found parts of it touchingly relevant.

Here’s how it opens: 

“What do you people really want, anyway?” is awfully funny.  It makes me think of the many many comments I’ve read on the New Yorker‘s Facebook pages (its flagship page and its off-shoot New Yorker Cartoons page).  My guess is that every single New Yorker cartoon posted online receives varying proportions of praise and condemnation, validating for the zillionth time the oldie but goodie cliche, “Everyone has an opinion.”

Last year I was asked by Gil Roth on his Virtual Memories podcast, “What is a New Yorker cartoon?” and my answer (after freezing a moment) was something like “It’s whatever the editors (at the time) think is a New Yorker cartoon.” In other words, there’s no set of rules, regulations, guidelines and requirements posted on one of the magazine’s walls. How boring would that be. It would also be the death of the magazine’s cartoons. Thurber addresses this in his foreword:

Thurber sums up his Foreword perfectly.  Perfectly for 1932, and perfectly for now and tomorrow at The New Yorker:

Some notes about the 5th Album: the album itself is somewhat more difficult to find than most of the others. Finding it with a dust jacket is even more of a challenge.  This was the final Album missing from the Spill’s set of dust-jacketed New Yorker Albums.  Some years back two generous individuals helped fill the gap.  I’m indebted to Edward Sorel for finding a copy (sans dust jacket) for the Spill’s archives and equally indebted to Chris Wheeler for donating the dust jacket of his copy to the Spill’s archives.

The cover of the Album, by Julian De Miskey, was originally the New Yorker cover for the issue of April 2, 1932:

Here’s the only text appearing elsewhere on the dust jacket other than the cover and spine; it’s on the inside front flap.  The back cover is blank, as is the back inside flap.