Alan Dunn (& Charles E. Martin) & The Guggenheim

From The Guggenheim’s website, June 6, 2017, “This New Yorker Cartoon Documented the Guggenheim’s 1959 Opening”read all about it here (Alan Dunn’s spread ran in the issue of November 28, 1959)

If you need more New Yorker cartoonists weighing in on the Guggenheim  there’s always this collection from 2005 —  The New Yorker Visits the Guggenheim.  According to the publisher: “This book brings together five decades worth of cartoons and cover illustrations that feature the iconic museum, along with period photographs that reveal the artists’ inspirations.”

The Guggenheim has been on the cover of The New Yorker a number of times, including this beauty from Charles E. Martin (CEM) in January of 1970.

 

 

Here’s Alan Dunn’s entry on the A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. New Yorker work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

And here’s Charles E. Martin’s A-Z entry:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

Mick Stevens’ Batch of the Month Club is Back; Attempted Bloggery’s “Name That Cartoonist”

 

 

 

Mick Stevens — one of the best there is in the New Yorker ‘s stable — has revved-up his Batch Club again. Check it out here.

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Attempted Bloggery caught my attention with this Name That Cartoonist challenge.

Below is a snippet of the unsigned drawing  by the mystery cartoonist in question.  To see the whole cartoon, go here.

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Nurit Karlin and Liza Donnelly; Eldon Dedini’s Concours d’Elegance Posters; Latest Addition to Ink Spill’s Archives: A 1926 New Yorker Advertising Booklet

Below’s a photo of two wonderful New Yorker cartoonists taken this morning in Tel Aviv. On the left is Liza Donnelly (no stranger to the Spill)  and to the right is Nurit Karlin, who we don’t see enough of here.  I think of Ms. Karlin’s work (as I think of Ms. Donnelly’s work) in the Thurber school: a simple line beautifully executing a solid idea.

Here’s Ms. Karlin’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Born in Jerusalem. NYer work: 1974 – . Collection: No Comment (Scribner, 1978). For more on Karlin see pp 124 -130 of Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies : The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus Books, 2005)

photo: Daniel Kenet/Gretchen Maslin

 

 

 

 

 

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From Attempted Bloggery, June 4, 2017, “Eldon Dedini: Concours d’Elegance” — Stephen Nadler, who specializes in digging deep, takes a look at some lesser-known  work by the great Mr. Dedini. See it all here.

 

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Tom Bloom, indefatigable collector and illustrator, dropped by the Spill’s world headquarters yesterday, bearing a splendid gift: May we say a few words about our contemporaries” — a 23 page booklet, bound with a string cord,  printed on “nice” paper (that is to say, it’s not lightweight bond).  Aimed at advertisers, it offers a survey of other publications in the New York market (The New York Times, The World, The Herald Tribune, etc.) before finally getting around to the virtues of advertising in The New Yorker. The pages are adorned with a good number of  New Yorker spot drawings by such artists as  Alice Harvey, Hans Stengel, Helen Hokinson, Alan Dunn, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin, who supplies the Eustace Tilleys . 

The copy shown below states the New Yorker had been publishing for a “scant twenty months”  — placing the booklet’s vintage approximately October of 1926. 

My thanks to Tom for this fabulous addition to the archives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alex Noel Watson: 1929- 2017

 

The Professional Cartoonists Organisation  has posted the sad news that Alex Noel Watson has passed away. You will read that he was a delightful person, a real character –and that was exactly the case; he was a high-spirited exceptionally friendly man of many talents. 

  Read the announcement here.

Mr. Watson’s work appears in The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985He contributed seven drawings to The New Yorker between 1970 and 1997 (his first appears below — it was in the issue of August 29, 1970).  Also shown is the cartoonist company he kept in that issue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link here to Mr. Watson’s entry in The British Cartoon Archive

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 Book of Interest: I Actually Wore This

Here’s an uncartoony book, with a few New Yorker cartoon folks in it, namely Roz Chast and the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.  

Written by Tom Coleman, with photographs by Jerome Jakubiec.  Published by Rizzoli.  Published this past March.  

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Interviews of Interest: Julia Wertz, Mimi Pond

From the podcast Sagittarian Matters, two recent episodes:

Episode #68  with Mimi Pond (May 26, 2017)

Episode #64 with  Julia Wertz  (April 28, 2017)

Click here to reach the site.

 

A Potted Video History of New Yorker Grim Reaper Cartoons; Eckstein: Snowmen As Modern Art; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s Drawings

 

 

 

 

From newyorker.com, The New Yorker Cartoon History: The Grim Reaper — this fun five minute video takes a look at one of the cartoonists best friends.  See it here.

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From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, “The Snowman As Art” — this piece by the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert, Bob Eckstein.

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The Cartoon Companion is back with ratings for all the cartoons appearing in the latest issue (a double: June 5 & 12) which includes the aforementioned Grim Reaper (on the beach this time around), two subway cartoons, a president playing golf, and a charming drawing from the late Michael Crawford.  

There is also word  that we’ll soon see a new look for the CC (as well as an interview with Harry Bliss and “sketches, rejected cartoons, and other fun stuff”) …can’t wait! For now, here’s the link to the latest post.

Color Work From Some Cartoon Greats; Audio: George Booth Talks Tools of the Trade

From Mike Lynch’s site, courtesy of Dick Buchanan, here’s a fun post of some color cartoon work from a variety of magazines. Included, among others, are New Yorker artists, William Steig, Garrett Price, Stan Hunt, William Von Riegen, Gahan Wilson, and Robert Day.

See them all here! 

 

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Jane Mattimoe has posted two short audio clips of the great George Booth talking about his tools of the trade.  Listen to them here

Seth Returns to The Virtual Memories Show; A Tune Jokes Cover; Now That’s What I Call Marketing…

New Yorker cover artist, Seth (Gregory Gallant) returns to Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast.  Hear it here.  And while you’re there check out Mr. Roth’s  archive of interviews with other cartoonists, including, among others, these New Yorker contributors: Edward Koren, Roz Chast, Sam Gross, Liza Donnelly, R.O. Blechman, Peter Kuper, and John Cuneo.  

 

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We have not heard the last of the cartoonist, Buford Tune (mentioned here yesterday).  To the left is a snippet of a Tune cover that has surfaced courtesy of Columbia University’s Karen Green.  See the entire cover over at Attempted Bloggery.

 

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Here, by way of Danny Shanahan, who donates most generously to the Spill‘s archives, is a box of  Le Pen markers with an understated New Yorker connection.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch; Attempted Bloggery on Buford Tune; An Art Young Retrospective

…The latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s a double, covering June 5th & June 12th) contains a debut cartoon by  Maddy Dai. Here’s her website.

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After a bunch of fun posts about the cartoonist, William Von Riegen, Stephen Nadler at Attempted Bloggery has focused on yet another New Yorker cartoonist whose name might not be familiar to many of us: Buford Tune.  Mr. Tune is a member of Ink Spill‘s “One Club” (meaning he had just one cartoon published in The New Yorker in his career, in the issue of October 10, 1936). Mr. Nadler shows us several College Humor drawings by Mr. Tune.   Read all about it here.

 

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This upcoming retrospective of Art Young’s work (to be published by Fantagraphics) was mentioned here awhile back, but is worth noting again as the pub date approaches (August 1).  And now there’s a cover to show!

Of further interest: the Art Young Gallery in Bethel Connecticut.

Here’s Mr. Young’s entry on the A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, NYC @ The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. NYer work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery