Addams Family Collaboration; Steinberg biography one of the NYTs 100 Notable Books of 2012; Interview: Mick Stevens; Toronto Group Photo

 

From the blog, Little Gothic Horrors, November 30, 2012,“An Addams Family Collaboration”

 

 

Deidre Bair’s Saul Steinberg: A Biography (Nan A.Talese/Doubleday) has been named one of The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2012.

 

 

From nudistnaturistamerica, November 29, 2012, “Naked Cartoons and Censorship”, Mick Stevens revisits his dots in this interview.

 

From boingboing, November 29, 2012, “Cartoonist Group Photo in Toronto Restaurant” — this fun photo includes, among others,  Seth, Charles Burns, Adrian Tomine, and Chris Ware (whose Building Stories was just named one of the year’s 10 Best Books of 2012 by The New York Times).

 

 

 

Arnie Levin In Conversation with Victoria Roberts at The Strand

 

From strandbooks.com, “New Yorker Cartoonists Victoria Roberts & Arnie Levin in Conversation”  December 4th, 2012: 7pm – 8pm (note: those wishing to attend must buy a copy of Roberts’ new book, After the Fall, or a $10.00 Strand gift card).

Here’s a chance to have a multi-enjoyable evening, with a visit to NYC’s landmark Strand Books, as well as an hour spent in the company of two great New Yorker cartoonists.  Arnie Levin began contributing to The New Yorker in 1974; Victoria Roberts was first published by the magazine in 1988. Who knows, maybe you’ll even find a copy of Levin’s wonderful 1980 cartoon collection, I’ll Skip the Appetizer — I Ate the Flowers while browsing through the Strand’s always interesting humor section. 

The Algonquin

 

The  holiday season reminds me of the Algonquin Hotel, and once reminded I only have to look across my desk to the snowglobe pictured above.  It was given to me years ago by friends who stayed at the hotel for a day or two.

 

I threw together the little scene above for Ink Spillers. The snowglobe sits atop Margaret Case Harriman’s Vicious Circle: The Story of The Algonquin Roundtable (Rinehart & Co., Inc., 1951.  Illustrated by the late great Al Hirschfeld). Behind the globe is Frank Case’s Tales Of A Wayward Inn (Garden City Publishing, Inc., 1941. With seven illustrations, including one by James Thurber and another by Covarrubias ). My thanks to Jack Ziegler for adding Wayward Inn  to our collection many moons ago. The Empire State Building and Chrysler Building are Times Square souvenirs. I found the tin Yellow Cab someplace years ago.  There’s a sign on the trunk:  “Always Be Careful Crossing Streets” — excellent advice then and now.

 

The mention of the Algonquin brings to mind a flood some of the biggest and brightest names associated with the earliest and earlier years of The New Yorker: Harold Ross, Dorothy Parker, Alexander Woollcott, Benchley, E.B. White, and Thurber, who made the place his second home when he wasn’t at his “great good place” in Connecticut.  It was in the Algonquin lobby that Thurber and another of the magazine’s giants, Peter Arno, met for the last time just before Thurber’s death.  And of course it was where William Shawn went for his cereal and orange juice lunch every week day during his long tenure as editor.

 

For those wanting much more on the Algonguin and its part in The New Yorker’s story, there are the books in the photo (Frank Case owned the Algonguin), as well as Thomas Kunkel’s terrific biography of Harold Ross, Genius in Disguise (Random House, 1995). There are plenty of other books with tales of the Algonquin — too many to mention at the moment. I will however note a few more books that go right to the heart of the matter:

Wit’s End: Days and Nights  of the Algonquin Round Table by James R. Gaines (Booksurge Publishing, 2007)

The Algonquin Wits Edited by Robert E. Drennan (The Citadel Press, 1985)

The Lost Algonquin Round Table Edited by Nat Benchley and Kevin C. Fitzpatrick (iUniverse, Inc., 2009)

A Holiday Cartoon Book Roundup

With the holidays approaching, this seems a good time to mention some of The New Yorker cartoon-related books that have appeared on Ink Spill this year.

 

 

 

Cartoon Monarch: Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW Publishing) Introduction by Ivan Brunetti, Foreward by Jared Gardner

From the Ink Spill review in March of this year: What’s not to like about this handsome volume? If I had my way every cartoonist of note would celebrated thusly: beautifully reproduced work (both black & white and color), with a thorough and informed foreward.

 

 

 

The Receptionist: An Education at The New Yorker by Janet Groth (Algonquin Books)

Comings and goings on at The New Yorker in the latter part of William Shawn’s reign as editor, with mentions of cartoonists and famous contributors such as Charles Addams, J.D. Salinger, Joe Mitchell and Woody Allen.

 

 

 

The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs (Random House)

This is a beautiful book, chock full of art  (covers & cartoons) as well as hefty contributions by many of the magazine’s writers.  A bonus: the book is Thurber heavy — and that’s never a bad thing.

 

 

 

 

I Really Should Be Drawing: The Blook by Mick Stevens (an e-book)

From one of the funniest cartoonists in modern times, this e-book, available through Lulu.com

 

 

The Resistance: A Thriller  by Peter Steiner (Minotaur Books)

Steiner’s fourth book in the Louis Morgon series.

  “Brilliant, evocative, elegiac, and suffused with sadness. . . . The Resistance is a powerful and beautiful reminder of Faulkner’s dictum that the only thing truly worth writing about is ‘the human heart in conflict with itself’.” –Booklist, starred review.

 

 

 

After the Fall: A Novel by Victoria Roberts (W.W. Norton & Co.)

From the ever-wonderful Victoria Roberts, this illustrated novel.

 After the Fall is one of a kind. With her distinctive, intelligent drawings and tongue-in-cheek humor, legendary cartoonist Victoria Roberts has crafted a delightfully quirky coming-of-age fantasy for adults. I couldn’t put it down.” (Patricia Bosworth, Vanity Fair Contributing Editor and author of Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman )

 

 

 

Steinberg: A Biography by Deirdre Bair (Doubleday/Nan A. Talese)

An excerpt from the Publishers Weekly review:

“The pre-eminent New Yorker cartoonist leads a life worthy of his own ironic art in this scintillating biography … Steinberg emerges as a tangle of neurotic contradictions … Bair’s long and amply researched biography unfolds in a graceful prose that’s stocked with absurdist scenes and colorful characters…”

 

 

No Man Is a Desert Island by Felipe Galindo Feggo (Jorge Pinto Books) A classic collection of cartoons by the multi-talented artist and cartoonist. 

 

 

Marco Goes to School by Roz Chast (Atheneum Books for Young Readers) 

An excerpt from The New York Times review:

“It’s never too early to expose your child to the joys of Chast’s wobbly-inked humor, and winning converts will be easy with this latest tale (after “Too Busy Marco”) about the dimwitted parrot…”

 

 

 

 

Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers you Were Never Meant to See by Francoise Mouly (Abrams)

The New Yorker’s Art editor gives us a behind-the-scenes look at art that didn’t make the cut.

 

 

 

Last but not least, The New Yorker’s Cartoons of the Year 2012 — a bookazine. Hundreds of cartoons culled from the past year.  With an Introduction by the magazine’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff.