Fun of Interest: Swann Auction Includes Addams, Barsotti, Steinberg, and So Many More

The New Yorker section of the upcoming Swann auction is an awful lot of fun.  The Addams cover shown above is just one of the gems listed. To see the “3D catalog” go here.  Other New Yorker artists whose work is going under the gavel include Charles Barsotti, Bemelmans, Abe Birnbaum, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Richard Decker, Ed Fisher, Heidi Goennel, Edward Gorey, Theodore Haupt, John Held, Jr., Helen Hokinson, Maira Kalman, Arnie Levin, Rick Meyerowitz, Bill Mauldin, Donald Reilly, Mischa Richter, Arnold Roth, Charles Saxon, Ronald Searle, Seth, Steinberg, Tom Toro, and Gahan Wilson.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 21, 2018

It’s always a great pleasure to see one of John Cuneos covers on the magazine. His restless pen never fails to amuse and amaze.  Read what Mr. Cuneo had to say about his swampy cover on this week’s issue.

The Tilley Tweak Watch:   Is it my imagination or is this a first: the Talk of the Town masthead (that would be the year old new masthead, not Rea Irvin’s classic masthead) appears on the left side of the magazine’s gutter instead of the right side.  If someone can point to an earlier issue sporting it on the left side please contact me. 

Below: The masthead in its usual place, on the right side.

 Below:  this week’s masthead on the left side.

And just for fun, here’s a blast from the past: the Talk masthead from May 24, 1947 featuring Rea Irvin’s classic design:

Speaking of design, here’s a little quiz: without first looking at this week’s issue which one of the photos below do you think is the actual photograph appearing on the lead page of Goings On About Town? The other two belong to ads. (*The answer is below)

And now (finally!) on to two cartoons in the issue that really struck me. I’m a big fan of seeing things I’ve never seen before. It’s a difficult thing to do in cartoonville. Mick Stevens’ drawing leads off the issue with a wonderful drawing. We don’t see many rut drawings. I’d say the same for the second drawing in the issue, courtesy of Ed Steed.  Applause for both drawings:

For the record, here are the cartoonists appearing in this issue:

Also for the record: this issue contains sixteen cartoons and nineteen illustrations. The illustrations (including photographs) are given five full pages (including the GOAT photo, which, for those wondering is… * the middle photo above).

— see you next week

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well-Thumbed: Thurber. A Biography by Burton Bernstein

There are three New Yorker-related books that have stood the test of interest for me since the mid 1970s when the New Yorker became the place I wanted and had to be: The Thurber Carnival, Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker, and Burton Bernstein’s Thurber.  A box-ful of New Yorker-related books have been published since (and a smaller box-ful were published before), but these three forever fascinate and educate. The Thurber Carnival came first — it was my entry point for his drawings and writing. Luckily for me, both Gill’s book and Bernstein’s were published soon after I first devoured Carnival — both, in fact,  came out in 1975 — coincidentally(?) the year the New Yorker celebrated its 50th anniversary) and not-so-coincidentally, exactly at the time I was ready for them to take over my world. Bernstein’s book, read while I was still in college, helped push me forward to living in the big city and going all out to break into the New Yorker.  I had already decided I needed to be part of what Thurber was part of — reading his biography only made it more imperative (as there was no plan “b”).

Luckily, I had a chance to meet Mr. Bernstein just a few years ago and tell him how important his book was/is to me. I explained how tattered my copy has become, and how, like Gill’s book and my first copy of Thurber Carnival, it is never far from where I work. True then, true today. 

I’m happy to say Thurber’s influence runs through me daily.  There are days I’m aware I’m trying to do something in the spirit of what he has done. A drawing recently published was an homage to Thurber’s Seal in the Bedroom. Even more recently I sold a drawing (not yet published) to the New Yorker that was heavily influenced by my all-time favorite Thurber drawing, “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss.”  I’ll note it here on the Spill when it is published. Now in my 41st year of contributing to the magazine, my debt to Thurber is never paid.  The same can be said about the other two authors who assisted in bringing me here.   

 

   

The Tilley Watch Online; Promo of Interest: Lars Kenseth’s Chuck Deuce

Another cycle of news cycles, another week’s worth of Daily cartoons. This week’s work brought to you by Danny Shanahan, Jeremy Nguyen, Pia Guerra, Avi Steinberg, and Kim Warp.

And over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Jason Adam Katzenstein, Olivia de Recat, and Tom Chitty.

— All of the above work, and more, can be found here!

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Follow-up: Lars Kenseth’s Pilot

Here’s a promo from Adult Swim wherein you’ll find a snippet from Lars Kenseth’s Chuck Deuce.

Link to Mr. Kenseth’s website here.

Profile of Interest: The “Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art”; Liza Donnelly to Speak at Ireland’s Inspirefest; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“The Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art”

From the New York Times, May 11, 2018, “The Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art” — this piece on a mural of various cartoon characters in a sports bar (James Thurber is mentioned here and there as the sports bar’s lineage includes Costello’s, where Thurber famously drew a mural in the mid 1930s. That mural, restored in 1972*, vanished in 1992**). 

*”Thurber Creatures Live Again in Bar Here,” NYTs,  April 9, 1972

**“Drawing Attention to Great Thurber Heist,” New York Post, November 9, 2005

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Liza Donnelly to Speak at Ireland’s Inspirefest

 “Liza Donnelly on art and activism: ‘Change Comes One Person At a Time'”

–this short piece on Ms. Donnelly as she prepares to head across the pond.

Link here to Liza Donnelly’s website.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” & “Simon” are back with their takes on the cartoons in this week’s New Yorker (the “Innovators Issue”).  The guys dig into drawings of snails, Death, Frankenstein, mice, a mime and more. Joe Dator is awarded Top Toon of the week.  See it all here.

 

 

The Thursday Watch: Ward Sutton Accepts Herblock Prize; King Features Signs Liniers; Conde Nast Consolidates Space/New Yorker to Switch Floors

Ward Sutton Accepts Herblock Prize

From Michael Cavna, The Washington Post“2018 Herblock Prize Winner is Inspired by His Forebears — and Enraged by Trump”–this piece on Ward Sutton’s Library of Congress acceptance speech. Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in October 2007.

Mr. Sutton’s website: http://www.suttonimpactstudio.com/

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King Features Signs Liniers

From Todd Allen,  The Comics Beat, May 10, 2018, “King Features Picks Up Argentinian Comic Stirp ‘Macanudo'”— this piece on Liniers, who has contributed covers to The New Yorker.

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Conde Nast Consolidates Space/ New Yorker to Switch Floors

From Keith J. Kelly, The NY Post, April 24, “Conde Nast Looking to Sublease a Third of Its WTC Headquarters” — the New Yorker is mentioned  in the 7th paragraph.

— For a quick  reminder of where The New Yorker started out and where & when it’s moved in its 93 years check out this Spill map.