Website of Interest: CEM (Charles E. Martin); Chris Weyant’s Boston Daily Cartoon

Here’s a link to a website devoted to the work of Charles E. Martin, better known to the New Yorker readership as CEM. Martin, who died in 1995 at the age of 85, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1938 (his first appearance was a cover). He went on to create nearly two hundred more covers for the magazine as well as just over four hundred cartoons. The website features a short film about his life.

(thanks to Liam Walsh for the link)

 

And in case you missed it: here’s Chris Weyant on Bob Mankoff’s weekly New Yorker blog speaking about the Daily Cartoon he created following the tragedy in Boston.

Albert Hubbell added to the New Yorker Cartoonists A – Z

Snooping around The New Yorker’s database this morning led me to discover that Albert Hubbell, who was published by The New Yorker from 1943 thru 1985,  had one cartoon published by the magazine, and so he is instantly added to Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z.  There couldn’t be a better moment to talk a little more about Mr. Hubbell’s career, so here then is his A-Z entry, posted moments ago:

 

Albert Hubbell  (photo above from the Wilton Bulletin, taken in the early 1960s)  Born, Duluth, Minnesota, 1908.  Died, 1994, Fairfield, Connecticut. 

After spending time at The Art Students League in New York, and some time studying in Paris, Mr. Hubbell worked for a short time as Book Editor for both Time and Newsweek. He worked briefly at  The Chicago Sun  before joining the New Yorker where he began contributing to Notes & Comment (his first contribution was in the issue of January 16, 1943), as well as fiction. 

In the April 22, 1944 issue, he contributed a cartoon (run full page) — his only cartoon to appear in the magazine.  During his last twenty years at the magazine, his contributions were mostly covers  – nineteen of them appeared between 1964 and 1985.  His distinctive spot drawings also appeared in the magazine for many years.  Seemingly foreshadowing his run of covers, he told a reporter from the Wilton (Connecticut) Bulletin in 1961 that  “I’ve been trying — and succeeding — in enlarging the spot drawings.  Now I’m doing bigger ones and getting away with it.”

Mr. Hubbell holds a unique position as the only temporary Art Editor in The New Yorker’s history, filling in for James Geraghty, the magazine’s Art Editor from 1939 thru 1973.  Hubbell held the temporary position for the first four months of 1943 while Geraghty was away participating in classes for the  Volunteer Officer Corps.

It’s not difficult to imagine Mr. Hubbell was thinking of his own work when he wrote the following in his introduction to William Steig’s 1990 collection, Our Miserable Life:

“…graphic art is best dealt with on its own terms — lines and hatchings and smears and smudges put down on paper to convey a thought about something, or just to create a drawing, like Steig’s of a rainy day, for its own sweet sake.”

 

 

Speaking: Bob Mankoff, Adrian Tomine; Video Preview: Roz Chast on bearing witness

From Virginia’s Washington & Lee University, April 17, 2013, “New Yorker Cartoon Editor to Speak at W&L”— link includes a caption contest designed by Bob Mankoff specifically for the Washington & Lee community (His talk is May 9, 2013).

 

From the North Adams (Massachusetts) Transcript, April 19, 2013, “Cartoonist, illustrator to speak at WCMA”Adrian Tomine will be at Williams College April 23, 2013.

 

From fora.tv, “A Drawn and Rendered Life” — this video preview of a talk by Roz Chast concerning the death of her mother.

New film on New Yorker Cartoonists: “Very Semi-Serious”

We’ve known that Leah Wolchok has been hard at work on her film about New Yorker cartoonists and thought this was an excellent time to check in with her (Ink Spill will revisit Very Semi-Serious in a matter of weeks).  We asked Leah to describe her film, and give us an idea of who’s in it (so far). Here’s what she had to say:

 

Very Semi-Serious is an offbeat meditation on humor, art and the genius of the single panel.  The film takes an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at the 88-year old New Yorker and introduces the cartooning legends and hopefuls who create the iconic cartoons that have inspired, baffled—and occasionally pissed off—all of us for decades.

The film has been a labor of love and obsession for 6 ½ years. The film is supported by Tribeca Film Institute, IFP, the Pacific Pioneer Fund, Women Make Movies and BAVC. We are working closely with cartoon editor Bob Mankoff, and we’ve interviewed a dozen cartoonists, including Roz Chast, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, Lee Lorenz, Matt Diffee, Drew Dernavich, Zach Kanin, Emily Flake, Liam Walsh and Liana Finck, who recently published her first cartoon in The New Yorker.  Next up is Bruce Eric Kaplan. 

We’ve also filmed scenes with Gahan Wilson, PC Vey, Sidney Harris, David Sipress, Mike Twohy, Joe Dator, Bob Eckstein, Robert Leighton, Farley Katz, Benjamin Schwartz, Carolita Johnson, Felippe Galindo, David Borchardt, Corey Pandolph, Paul Noth and Barbara Smaller.

Jack Ziegler and Andy Friedman both created original artwork for the film.

In a few weeks we are launching our website and trailer, featuring animation, interviews and never-before-seen footage from the New Yorker headquarters, cartoonists’ studios and inside the homes of caption contest devotees.  Plus a killer ping pong match between Bob Mankoff and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz.