The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 25, 2018

Noted that this week’s cover (above right) is by Harry Bliss, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoonists.  Noted because the majority of the magazine’s covers were once handled by its cartoonists (somewhat more than 60% a year by my iffy calculations). The number of cartoonists contributing covers these days can be counted on one hand: Mr. Bliss, Roz Chast, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Danny Shanahan, and George Booth.

The change came, as so many changes did, with the arrival of Tina Brown as editor in 1992.  At a meeting of cartoonists called by Ms. Brown just before she took the reigns as editor of The New Yorker, a bunch of us sat around a large table in an upstairs conference room at the fabled Algonquin. Arriving late (Amtrak issues), I sat next to then art editor Lee Lorenz and asked him what I’d missed.  He leaned over and whispered, “She’s going to bring in a lot of illustrators.” He then added something else, which you’ll have to wait to read in my memoir.

Some of Mr. Bliss’s cover has that Hitchcockian “Rear Window” feel to it; the structure of the cartoon (using balconies) has been put to good use by a few cartoonists over the years. Here’s an example that readily came to mind: a Liza Donnelly drawing that appeared in the January 20, 2014 New Yorker:

To read what Mr. Bliss had to say about his cover, go to this mini-interview here on  newyorker.com.

From the Depart of Just Sayin’:  The number of illustrations in this issue outweigh (in space) the number of cartoons appearing.  Sixteen illustrations (not including Tom Bachtell’s wonderful drawings that are laced through the Talk of The Town). Three of the sixteen are full page. Seventeen cartoons this week, one a full page by Liana Finck

The sizing of cartoons in this issue is generally very good. Most every drawing  gets some breathing room (just one is shoe-horned into a tight space).  

Three drawings noted: Ben Schwartzs bargain hunter’s mounted big game is fun. Charles Addams had a field day with this scenario throughout his spectacular New Yorker run.  Here’s one example .

Love Edward Koren‘s restaurant drawing. Some New Yorker drawings are referred to as evergreens — they always work, no matter the year, the trends, the political landscape, the whatever. Mr. Koren’s drawing is an evergreen.

The Spill‘s candidate for New Yorker drawing of the year (thus far) is Joe Dator‘s Abe Lincoln cartoon. (You can find it here on the magazine’s slideshow of the current issue’s cartoons. It’s number 13.)  When Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor was asked why his magazine did not run color cartoons his response was, “What’s so funny about red?”* Mr. Dator’s drawing is a perfect example of what is funny about pink and orange, and yellow, and green and purple.

Spill round of applause for the above drawings.

*The New Yorker did run one color drawing in Ross’s time, Rea Irvin’s two page color spread, The Maharajah of Puttyput Receives a Christmas Necktie From the Queen. It was in the issue of December 12, 1925.

Still missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk of The Town masthead. Here’s a Spill piece about its disappearance and replacement.

This is what the real thing looks like:

 

 — See you next week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s First Father’s Day Cover

I took a moment to look up when Father’s Day began and found it wasn’t officially designated as a nationwide event until 1972 ( footnote: the first Father’s Day was celebrated in Washington state on June 19, 1910).  A quick look through the must-have Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) led me to the above beauty, dated June 15, 1987, by one of the magazine’s cartoon gods, the great Edward Koren.  Surprising that the magazine took so long to tie-in Dad’s Day with a cover? Yes, and no. It’s entirely possible there’s an earlier non-official Father’s Day New Yorker cover, but the day’s more than half-done and the blank page awaits.

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Personal History: David Sipress & His Father & Baseball

In the spirit of the day here’s a brand new piece on newyorker.com , “My Father and Sandy Koufax” by the cartoonist, David Sipress.

The Tilley Watch Online: June 11-16, 2018; More Arthur Getz (at The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon)

Yet another Trumpian week for the Daily Cartoon. 

The participating cartoonists:  Danny Shanahan, one of the magazine’s modern masters, appeared twice in the week, with his second a nod to the climbing racoon we all fell in love with; Lars Kenseth, whose one-of-a-kind drawings also appeared twice (neither was a racoon drawing, unfortunately), and Lisa Rothstein, possibly making her Daily debut (someone please advise if this is incorrect).

And the Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Tom Chitty Jeremy Nguyen with David Ostow, Liana Finck, and honorary New Yorker cartoonist, Colin Stokes (he’s the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, and… he’s co-written a published New Yorker cartoon or two).

You can see all of the above work, and more, here.

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More Arthur Getz

I recently drove over to Sharon, Connecticut to catch the Arthur Getz exhibit at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon. It runs til the end of this month, so hurry and go before it’s gone! One of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists, Peter Steiner, joined me to tour the art on the walls, including the original art for the terrific cover shown above. This is a large piece (my guess is it’s about a yard tall), graphically powerful as a cover and even more so when you’re up close to the original (it’s currently hanging along a staircase). There are a number of other originals like it (in the wow category), but also a good number of small pieces (many “killed” covers) as well as some pastoral watercolors. Many of the pieces are for sale. A portfolio of work sits in one of the rooms — you can breeze through and pick up the original art for as close a look as you want.

Getz’s New Yorker work really shines through in this show. Mr. Steiner and I spent some time gazing at them, marveling at Getz’s ability to grasp the big picture so beautifully. I’m reluctant to label any specific period of The New Yorker as golden or aluminum or silver, or whatever, but as Mr. Getz’s career spanned 50 years (1938-1988)  his work certainly was being published during the magazine’s so-called Golden Age.

As mentioned on the Spill not long ago there’s a companion exhibit at the nearby Moviehouse in Millerton (NY) featuring much more of Getz’s New Yorker work. You really need to see that too (it runs through the end of August).

Podcast of Interest with Illustrations by Hilary Campbell, Sophia Warren, Amy Kurzweil; A New Yorker State of Mind Goes Deep Into the Issue of May 25, 1929; A lot of Hokinson on Attempted Bloggery

From Broadway World, June 14, 2018, “New Scripted Soap Opera Podcast GOSSIP is out today from Stitcher/Midroll”

— with Hilary Campbell, Sophia Warren and Amy Kurzweil content

Ms. Campbell’s website.

Ms. Warren’s website.

Ms. Kurzweil’s website.

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A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of the New Yorker: the issue of May 25, 1929

One of the Spill‘s fave blogs is up to the midway point of the last year of the 1920s.  Fun reading here.

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A lot of Hokinson on Attempted Bloggery

And on another favorite Spill blog, Attempted Bloggery, there’s been a lot of Helen Hokinson lately.  Check it out here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Father’s Day Issue Cartoons

The CC boys have returned with their rated takes on each and every cartoon in the New Yorker’s latest issue (June 18, 2018).  Read it here.

 

Exhibit of Interest: “Funny Ladies At The New Yorker: Then and Now” at The Society of Illustrators; Fave Photo of the Day: Sam Gross & Bob Eckstein; Case For Pencils Follows-Up on Roz Chast’s Search For a Pen; Profile of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

Exhibit of Interest: “Funny Ladies at The New Yorker: Then and Now” at The Society of Illustrators

Something to look forward to mid-summer! The Society of Illustrators will exhibit a survey of the women cartoonists of The New Yorker, as well as a panel discussion you won’t want to miss,  moderated by the show’s curator, Liza Donnelly.  Some info here, with more to follow. Drawing above by the great Nurit Karlin.

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Fave Photo of the Day: the incomparable Sam Gross with the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert, Bob Eckstein, looking over sketches at the New Yorker‘s art department.  My thanks to  The Surreal McCoy for use of her photo.

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Case For Pencils Follows-up on Roz Chast’s Search For a Pen

Ms. Chast asked for pen suggestions.  Case For Pencil readers responded.  Read here.

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Profile of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

From Wake Forest Magazine, June 14, 2018, “So You Want To Be In The New Yorker?” — this profile of one of the newer New Yorker contributors, Emma Hunsinger (her first cartoon appeared in the issue of November 27, 2017).

 (photo by Peri Hofmann)

 

Danny Shanahan’s Anthony Bourdain Drawings

Back in 2006 Danny Shanahan was enlisted to draw promotional drawings for Anthony Bourdain’s “No Reservations”  — the ad drawings eventually ran in the New Yorker’s April 4th “Journeys” special edition.

Mr. Shanahan was kind enough to share a few of the drawings here along with the interesting notation that Mr. Bourdain himself suggested, in an email, a number of ideas for the campaign:“Just some basic things I see in one form or another that might be good starting points for a cartoonist to riff on.” 

How the drawing looked in the magazine:

Here are a few of Mr. Bourdain’s thoughts, with a finished Shanahan cartoon inspired by one of the suggestions:

Me sitting on a camel, or petting a dog, saying, “I don’t care what you’ve heard about me…You’ve got nothing to worry about.”

This will make you strong.” as man offers up some  (usually alive or hideous concoction).

The ‘sick pool’ we have on the road — where we all bet on who gets food poisoned first.

  Well…as you know, plumbing is always a concern on the road– and nothing like a good toilet joke.

 

— The Spill thanks Mr. Shanahan for all of this material.