Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn; Latest Cartoon Companion Posted; Q & A With Jacob Samuel

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn

 

In my hundreds of visits to the always interesting  Rodgers Book Barn in Hillsdale, New York I’d never walked in with six other New Yorker cartoonists…until yesterday.  The Book Barn’s owner, Maureen Rodgers  allowed us to sort of take over the place as we browsed and talked and generally hung out for an hour or so. 

Photo above: from left to right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Michael Maslin, Robert Leighton, Danny Shanahan, Peter Steiner, and Ken Krimstein

This group then moved on to the classic Martindale Diner, and eventually made its way to the Spill‘s world headquarters. Below is a photo of  Danny Shanahan, Ken Krimstein, and Bob Eckstein looking at a copy of Charles Addams’ Groaning Board. And that’s Sam Gross looking at Peter Arno’s Parade. (photos courtesy of Robert Leighton).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Latest Cartoon Companion Posted

Speaking of cartoons and cartoonists…the latest Cartoon Companion has been posted. The CC boys rate the latest the cartoons in the New Yorker;  this issue features, among others, the Grim Reaper playing hide-and-seek, Orpheus in an elevator, and the big bad wolf using an inhaler.  See it all here.

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A Q&A With Jacob Samuel

From CJNews.com, June 22, 2017 , “Cartoonist Depicts Millennial Misery With Slinky Hell” — this Q&A with Jacob Samuel, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Link here to visit Mr. Samuel’s website.

A Small Treasure From the Jack Ziegler Memorial; Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview, Pt.2; Looking For Eustace

A Small Treasure From The Jack Ziegler Memorial

Here are a few pages from the fine 10 page pamphlet that was available last Saturday at the memorial for Jack Ziegler. The pamphlet contains a  lovely unpublished cover (seen below) as well as a two-page  “killed” New Yorker spread (not shown) and a number of photographs of Mr. Ziegler, as well as a list of his collected work (shown below). 

 

 

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Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview Pt. 2

If you enjoyed Part 1 of the Bliss interview, no doubt you’ll want to read Pt.2…  Read Mr. Bliss’s interview here.

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Looking For Eustace

Here’s something I’ve done maybe just once before: ask Ink Spill visitors if anyone out there has something I’ve looked for for years but have yet to find. This time it’s the miniature (about 3 1/2 inches high, I believe) Eustace Tilley pictured here.  There were 500 manufactured by Sebastian Miniatures back in 1949 (apparently there’s a newer version, from 1981, with a black base.  Only 6 of those were made).  For me, this 1949 Tilley has become the Holy Grail of New Yorker “stuff” (the little bit of information I found about it comes from a book, The Sebastian Miniature Collection by Dr. Glenn Johnson).

If anyone out there has one and would be willing to trade for a couple of my New Yorker original drawings, please contact me.

Show of Interest: Tom Bachtell’s Talk of The Town Illustrations; Whither MAD Magazine?; Roz Chast’s Tiny Shirts

Show of Interest

If you’ve opened up the New Yorker to The Talk of The Town you’ve seen Tom Bachtell’s work.  Now you can see the drawings in person at The Bower Center For the Arts .

Here’s a fine article  about the exhibit and Mr. Bachtell.

Link here to Tom Bachtell’s website.

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Whither MAD Magazine?

Every so often I post something that might seem out of the range of The Spill‘s concerns, but MAD magazine is very much a part of the New Yorker cartoonist universe. Many a New Yorker cartoonist will tell you that MAD was an early comic education and inspiration.  What’s more, a number of New Yorker cartoonists contribute to MAD.  So here’s a thoughtful piece focused on a rumor concerning MAD’s fate.  

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Roz Chast’s Tiny Shirts

This photo appeared on yesterday’s Spill .  It shows Roz Chast (with the great Edward Koren looking on) working on a tiny paper shirt construction at Jack Ziegler’s memorial last Saturday.  As promised, here are the shirts (they made their way out of The Society of Illustrators to The Spill‘s archives via the vest pocket of Danny Shanahan’s jacket).

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Oslo Freedom Forum; New Yorker Cartoons and Parenting; Andrea Arroyo’s Worldwide Artists Project; Christopher Weyant on Newspapers & Editorial Cartoons; The Tilley Watch: Ellis Rosen’s Subway Drawing, Changes for The Daily Cartoon, Another Fave Photo

Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Oslo Freedom Forum

From Extranewsfeed, “Oslo Freedom Forum, 2017” — a selection of Liza Donnelly‘s live drawings from that recent event.

Link to Ms. Donnelly’s website.

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New Yorker Cartoons and Parenting

From Mental Floss, “Changing Parenting Attitudes, As Seen Through New Yorker Cartoons”

—   Indiana University sociologists “examine cultural feelings about parenting through cartoons published in The New Yorker between 1925 and 2006”

Note: The New Yorker collected a bunch of its kids cartoons back in 2001 (with a Jack Ziegler cartoon on the cover).

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Andrea Arroyo’s Worldwide Artists Project

 New Yorker cover artist, Andrea Arroyo tells Ink Spill this project was “launched hours after election. So far I have over 230 international artists participating (from over 30 countries,) and more joining weekly. The exhibit is online indefinitely and I’m planning exhibits in Alaska, New Jersey  & New York City.”

A number of New Yorker artists are represented including Tom Toro, Barry Blitt, Bob Staake, Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo (feggo), Rich Sparks, and R. SikoryakGo here for all the info, and a list of all the artists. 

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Christopher Weyant on Newspapers and Editorial Cartoons

From Editor & Publisher, “Digital Publishing: Why Newspapers Need to Invest More in Political Cartoons” — long-time New Yorker cartoonist Christopher Weyant has been studying just that.  Read it here.

 

 

 

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…Nice to see: The Gothamist posted this about Ellis Rosen’s current New Yorker cartoon.  Visit Mr. Rosen’s website here.

 

…Visitors to The New Yorker‘s Daily Cartoon will probably note that it has been revamped. The now defunct version featured one of the magazine’s cartoonists work for a number of weeks (sometimes months). This new version abandons the one cartoonist model and presents a variety of cartoonists work within the week. 

…Here’s another favorite photo from Jack Ziegler’s memorial last Saturday at the Society of Illustrators. We see Roz Chast working on some tiny paper shirt constructions (yes, tiny shirt constructions), with Edward Koren looking on.  The Spill will post scans of the shirts in a few days. (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day; An Obscure Hoff

Of many wonderful photos from Jack Ziegler‘s memorial this past Saturday,  this one really caught my eye. Taken by the New Yorker‘s former television critic, Nancy Franklin, we see, from the left, the New Yorker‘s newly appointed cartoon editor, Emma Allen, then Anne Hall Elser, and Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s art editor from 1973 through 1993, and then cartoon editor from 1993 through 1997. We have Mr. Lorenz to thank for bringing Mr. Ziegler’s work into the magazine.  Ms. Elser was Mr. Lorenz’s invaluable assistant in the art department for his 24 years in that position.

At some point during Saturday’s event,  Danny Shanahan introduced Ms. Allen to Mr. Lorenz.  I’m hoping a photo will surface.

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An Obscure Hoff

Scott Burns, of Armadillo & Dicker Books out in California has sent in this scan of a hitherto (for me) unseen Syd Hoff piece. Here’s Mr. Burns’ description:

The Jigger. Fall, 1951, Vol 3. No. 4. Philadelphia: The Drake Press. 3”x6” stapled wrappers, 24 pp. Appears to be a trade magazine for distribution to bartenders and others in the liquor industry. Recipes, thirteen cartoons plus cover by Syd Hoff, TV announcements, party hints.
 
 
Note:  The Spill posts pieces such as this purely for historical reasons, i.e., there is no commercial attachment to this bookseller or any other.

New Yorker Cartoonists Gather to Honor Jack Ziegler

 

Cartoon colleagues gathered yesterday at the Society of Illustrators to honor one of the New Yorker‘s cartoon gods, Jack Ziegler, who passed away this March

Shown above, back row, left – right: Trevor Hoey, John Donohue, Robert Leighton, Tom Toro (in profile), George Booth, David Borchart (standing tall over Mr. Toro and Mr. Booth), Anne Hall Elser (Ms. Elser was Lee Lorenz’s long-time assistant in the  New Yorker‘s Art Department), Bill Woodman, John O’Brien, Paul Karasik (in the tie), Peter Steiner, and John Klossner.

Next row: Ken Krimstein, Bob Eckstein, Amy Hwang, Roz Chast, Mort Gerberg, Bob Mankoff (directly behind Mr. Gerberg),  Sam Gross, Liza Donnelly, Michael Maslin, Marshall Hopkins (plaid shirt), Joe Dator.

Front row: P.C. Vey, Mick Stevens, Danny Shanahan, Edward Koren, Felipe Galindo, Andrea Arroyo, and Mike Lynch. 

Not shown: Lee Lorenz, Emma Allen, Colin Stokes, Liana Finck, Peter Kuper, Marisa Acocella Marchetto, Barbara Smaller.

(Photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly)

 

Firsts: Jack Ziegler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning today, Ink Spill will every so often, and without warning, run the first New Yorker cartoon by one of its artists.  Accompanying the drawing will be that issues Table of Contents, so we have an idea of the lay of the magazine’s cartoon land at that time.  Starting things off is the first New Yorker cartoon by the late and exceptionally great Jack Ziegler, published in the issue of February 11, 1974. This is an evergreen drawing; it could run any week, any year and still work as well as it did back in 1974. When I interviewed Mr. Ziegler last Fall (here are links to part one and two) he said: “It’s always nice when cartoonists know how to draw so that they can give us something pleasant and fun to look at.”

Below:  the Table of Contents from that issue. The New Yorker‘s editor then was William Shawn, and the art editor was Lee Lorenz.

 

The Lasting Success Of John O’Brien’s 1st Book

From atlasobscura.com, June 12, 2017, “Decoding the Success of a Picture Book about Monsters and Trolls: There’s a Reason John O’Briens 1977 Illustrations Still Have Obsessed Fans”  — a piece by Jackson Kuhl about the early work of a wonderful New Yorker cover artist and cartoonist. Mr. O’Brien began contributing to The New Yorker in August 1987.  Read the story here!

 

 

Link here to visit  John O’Brien’s website.  Below: examples of his New Yorker work.