The Think And The Ink: The New Yorker Album of Drawings 1925 – 1975

After spending time in the early years of the New Yorker Albums these past few Sundays I thought it would be fun to skip a few decades and look at how the magazine celebrated its 50th anniversary. I love the simplicity of this Album, its no-frills approach. Beginning with the no-nonsense cover featuring the title (set in the so-called Irvin typeface) and Rea Irvin’s bowing Eustace Tilleys. I look at these Tilleys as time period bookends, greeting each other from two very different eras. They are not quite mirror images of each other: the one bowing from 1975 is microscopically different than the one from 1925. If there’s any intended symbolism in that (and I doubt it), my guess would be that the magazine mascot was shown as true to its roots while allowing for subtle change (glacial change in those years).

The only introductory text is found on the inside front flap. It’s as if the magazine’s editor (William Shawn at that time) wanted to say that whatever needed to be said about this amazing body of work was going to be said by the work itself and not by “opinionaters.”

In a first for one of the Albums, there’s a dedication (Lee Lorenz had succeeded Mr, Geraghty in 1973):

The back cover lists the contributors (“Artists”) from Charles Addams to the new kid on the block, Jack Ziegler.

Appropriately enough, the Album leads off with a full page drawing by Peter Arno (one of his drawings led off the very first Album).  The volume ends with a small drawing by William Steig; a first drawing and a last by artists whose work was, in the words of the flap copy above, visually beautiful. The work in between is, of course, also visually beautiful, as well as funny. In more modern times, in the era post-Geraghty, post-Lee Lorenz, a different approach to the magazine’s cartoons was espoused: “it’s the think, not the ink.” But for the first 72 years of New Yorker‘s existence, it was the magazine’s dedication to the think and the ink, that allowed the New Yorker cartoon to make its considerable mark.

 

 

 

Smilby Cartoons Auctioned; New Yorker cartoon editor (and associate cartoon editor) Sing; Soglow Covers Judge

Smilby Cartoons Auctioned

From the Rugby & Letterworth Observer, November 17, 2017 “Rugby Cartoonist’s Playboy Art Raises Eyebrows at Auction”  — this piece on auctioned work by the late cartoonist Francis Wilford-Smith, known professionally as Smilby. His work appeared in the New Yorker from 1962 through 1971.

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New Yorker cartoon editor (and associate cartoon editor) Sing

In this week’s episode of  “Cartoons, Etc.” there’s singing.  See it here. (on the left is Emma Allen, the magazine’s cartoon editor, and on the right, Colin Stokes, the  associate cartoon editor).

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Soglow Covers Judge

More fun stuff over on Attempted Bloggery.  See the great Otto (“Little King”) Soglow’s color work on the cover of Judge here.

Cartoon Companion Rates Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Event of Interest: Addams in the City

Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

A new issue of The New Yorker means a new batch of cartoons for the Cartoon Companion‘s “Max” and “Simon” to examine, explore, and evaluate. They consider the merits (or lack thereof), then apply their rating system of 1 through 6 (6 being tops). Read it here.

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Event of Interest: Addams in New York 

From The New York Times, November 16, 2017″ Events For Children in NYC This Week”:  Family Day: Addams

According to the Times, a “celebration that revolves around the [Morris-Jumel] mansion’s new exhibit, “Charles Addams: Family & Friends” which features 35 of his works, along with photographs and memorabilia”

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Lost then Found

The Tilley Watch Online

Two Blopers this week on the Daily.  It’s actually Brendan Loper — he signs  his work “Bloper” which to this cartoonist’s eyes and ears involuntarily suggests “blooper” (sorry, Mr. Loper)… Nice elephant in the brush drawing by Mr. Loper.  Other drawings feature Putin (by Loper), the Clintons and our president (by Lars Kenseth) and the Panamanian files (by Maddie Dai), and a marathoner, courtesy of Farley Katz (with enjoyable forest animals by Mr. Katz). And over on Daily Shouts, an advice column (to appear every other week) makes its debut.  Liana Finck answers tough questions about “how to act in difficult situations”…

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Lost Then Found

Back in February of 2008 I was asked to be what was jokingly called a “cartoon captain” for a month.  That meant contributing pieces to newyorker.com on a daily basis (in my case, I alternated between a graphic series called Cartoonography  and written pieces).  These pieces were all archived on the magazine’s site.  That is, until a few months ago, when all of the written pieces suddenly (and mysteriously) disappeared (the Cartoonography pieces were not disappeared).

Following the disappearance, I decided to post all the written pieces here on the Spill, but found I could not find a single copy of any of them here at home (either hard copies or digital files). All seemed lost. The online folks at the New Yorker also (initially) came up empty-handed (or empty-filed). Then just last week, all of the pieces suddenly reappeared online. I want to thank Michael Agger at newyorker.com for his diligence. The pieces on newyorker.com are exactly as first published.  For the Spill, I updated the piece titled “Glossary” to reflect the new cartoon editor era.

I’ve collected the pieces on the Posted Notes section of the Spill (just scroll down past all of the Rea Irvin Talk mastheads)…so they can be read as a whole.  And you can now also find them once again here on newyorker.com among other pieces I’ve contributed (Cartoonography is there still, and it can be found on the Bio section of the Spill).  Whew.

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day; Appearance of Interest: Robert Grossman; Pond Pencilled; PR: Chast, Ware

Fave Photo of the Day

Courtesy of New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Jeremy Nguyen, this photo taken last Monday of a cartoon event at Brooks Brothers.  Beginning at the bottom ‘o’ the stairs and heading up: Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, and cartoonists Drew Dernavich, Liana Finck, and Jason Adam Katzenstein (aka J.A.K.). And unless I’m mistaken, that’s the classic Brooks Brothers Vintage Bomber Jacket (in Khaki)* just behind Ms. Allen .

*unpaid advertisement

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Appearance of Interest: Robert Grossman

One of the greats, Robert Grossman, will appear at the New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium on November 28th.  All the information here.

Mr. Grossman, widely known for his illustration, was, in the earliest stage of his career, an assistant to James Geraghty (the New Yorker art editor from 1939- 1973).  Mr. Grossman’s first New Yorker appearance (below) was published January 13, 1962.

 

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Pond Pencilled

Mimi Pond is the subject of Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post wherein the cartoonist discusses her tools of the trade.  (above: Ms. Pond’s work area).   See the post here!

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…From Comics DC, November 12, 2017,  “Roz Chast, ‘Going To Town’ Recorded at Politics & Prose”

Here’s the video of Chris Ware’s appearance on The Charlie Rose Show. Mr. Ware is currently making the rounds promoting his new book, Monograph By Chris Ware (Rizzoli).

 

Liza Donnelly Draws International Center for Journalists Awards…then Breaks (Her Drawing) Arm.

From the International Center for Journalism, “New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly Draws Awards Dinner Highlights” — a slideshow of Ms. Donnelly’s work from last Thursday night’s awards. 

The next morning, after a run on the Mall in Washington, Ms. Donnelly fell and broke her drawing arm. She posted this on social media:

Two days later she posted this first attempt at drawing with her left hand:

Ink Spill wishes Ms. Donnelly a speedy recovery!