The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of October 30, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

We are definitely in the Halloween mode in the new issue, and it all begins with Carter Goodrich’s cover; a scary clown looking remarkably similar to our current president peers out from the woods.  For some reason my thoughts drifted back to what I believe was the first appearance of the Donald on the cover way way back in 1992; the Robert Risko high-kickin’ chorus line cover was on the 13th issue of Ms. Brown’s tenure.

Skipping through GOAT (Goings On About Town), and, sigh, the redrawn Rea Irvin Talk of the Town masthead,  we come to page 18, and the first cartoon of the issue.  Zach Kanin is back with what at first might seem like a Halloween themed drawing, what with the full-face ski hats, but it’s not Halloween-related — it’s a pizza crime cartoon. Not the first pizza drawing in the magazine (for instance: who could forget Gahan Wilson’s 1997 classic), but possibly the first incorporating a stick-up using bank robbery terminology.  My one microscopic quibble with the drawing is not with the drawing at all, but the proximity of the Otto Soglow spot drawing just above it.  I’m firmly in the camp of letting the New Yorker‘s cartoons have plenty of breathing room. 

 Roz Chast’s gingerbread man drawing, appearing five pages after Mr. Kanin’s, is an example of plenty of breathing room.  A Danny Shanahan carrot cake man two issues ago, and now a gingerbread man.  Somebody should really do a book of pastry people cartoons.

Nine pages following Ms. Chast’s couch-bound confection (with a Trump illustration appearing along the way) is an Amy Hwang drawing that, at first glance, appears to be Halloween-related. But, like Mr. Kanin’s, it’s not a Halloween drawing (although I’ve seen situations like this set up in front yards of homes at this time of year). A buff executioner stands beside a rope-less(?) guillotine. Five pages later is a Will McPhail drawing with its figures in silhouette (guillotine, silhouette…what an issue).  Lovely night sky, Mr. McPhail. On the very next page is another William’s drawing (William Haefeli).  I should mention that all of the drawings, from Ms. Chast’s on, have been beautifully placed on the page. Mr. Haefeli delivers a principal’s office cartoon drawn in his trademark style. This drawing might even have more going on than the usual Haefeli contribution. I found myself enlarging the cartoon on my computer screen to see what was on the cartoon computer screen and what was going on out in the cartoon hallway.

Three pages later is a Julia Suits drawing that causes us (or maybe just me) to imagine another cartoon within her cartoon.  A fellow at a very long bar is thinking about a woman who’s walked into his wet cement. That’s what I was imagining — the walking into the wet cement scene.

On the very next page is — yay! — a Halloween cartoon, courtesy of one of our modern anchor cartoonists, Joe Dator.  Mr. Dator’s “last-minute” parade drawing made me think about the now famous Greenwich Village mega-parade, wherein gazillions of costumed folks gather together.  Mr. Dator’s less populated parade is appealing. Four pages later, a drawing by one of the most recognizable stylists in recent times, Seth Fleishman. Looking slightly Spy vs Spy in this drawing (it’s the hat, I think, plus the mash-up of black & white figures) Mr. Fleishman dips into mobsterville  — the fish wrapped in newspaper). 

On the very next page is a Drew Panckeri drawing of a reclined and relaxed member of the armed forces on his bed speaking with what I imagine is a counterpart from an adversarial country. I find the fellow’s coat interesting — it looks a bit like an Eisenhower jacket, but it’s not quite short enough. Several objects in the room caused me to linger on this drawing for awhile: the lava lamp, the large model (?) of a rocket, and the framed piece which looks as if it might be based on James Montgomery Flagg’s 1917 “I Want You poster (itself based on New Yorker cartoonist Alfred Leete‘s earlier work, shown below far right). The fellow in Mr. Panckeri’s  frame is definitely pointing at the viewer, but his clothing looks more carny than country.  

 

Fourteen pages later (following a photo essay) is a Bruce Eric Kaplan drawing of a woman in bed. As usual with Mr. Kaplan, a winning caption. Opposite Mr. Kaplan’s drawing is a wonderful bookend to Mr. Dator’s parade drawing (it being the Halloween issue): witches standing at a boiling cauldron.  This is a lovely drawing, with an Edward Gorey-ish feel to it.

Ten pages later is the last drawing of the issue (not counting the caption contest work on the last page).  It’s a Paul Noth word play drawing.  I see people at a table with the mention of wine and I cannot not think of James Thurber’s 1937 oft-reprinted classic drawing.

I can’t leave this week’s issue without a Charles Addams shout-out. If you have a moment, seek out his covers and drawings.  With Addams it was Halloween all year long. 

Til next Monday… 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

84 Years Ago: The Sixth New Yorker Album of Cartoons

I love all of the New Yorker Albums that have come out in the magazine’s 92 years, but this one I like maybe just a teeny-tiny bit more than many of the rest (partially due to the fact that it was a gift from Jack Ziegler, back in the days when I was building a set of all the albums, with their dust jackets.  Jack’s copy arrived with a gold star on it, which, as you can see, is still there).

Published in 1933 by Harper & Brothers, the 6th Album sports a collage cover by Harry Brown (who contributed 18 covers to the magazine from 1931 thru 1937); the collage was a first — it was the first time the magazine allowed something other than a reproduction of one of its covers to grace an Album. I like the burst of color, but am thrilled the cover’s designer left the Thurber drawings, running up the strap, in black and white.

Starting top left on the cover, we see Otto Soglow’s Little King and his Queen and a couple of footmen in red with yellow sashes. Going clockwise, Peter Arno’s “Major” and his wife, then down at the bottom at the cover, Rea Irvin’s iconic Eustace Tilley. On the left is a William Steig father holding his son. In the middle of the cover, two Barbara Shermund ladies standing close to each other; directly below them, a classic Helen Hokinson woman (a so-called Hokinson “lunch lady”) holding her dog.

The inside cover flap shows us a partial list of the artists represented:

    

Looking through this Album I’m always struck by the variety.  Variety of sensibilities, of art, of subject.  Published just eight years after the very first issue of The New Yorker appeared on newsstands it’s loaded with artists whose work is instantly recognizable. It’s an excellent portrait of the New Yorker‘s first stable; a wealth of exceptionally talented artists such as Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Rea Irvin, Charles Addams, Otto Soglow, Carl Rose, Gluyas Williams, Whitney Darrow, Richard Decker, Syd Hoff, George Price, Alan Dunn, and Mary Petty.

Artistry was all over the place back in those early years (there’s a huge difference in Thurber’s work from Reginald Marsh’s, or Soglow’s from Perry Barlow’s). What a fun,  exciting, beautiful mix. 

_________________________________________________________________ 

Note: you can sometimes find a copy of this collection in used bookstores, or here online (although I don’t see any listed, at the moment, with a dust jacket). With the dust jacket, or without, you’re still in for a real treat.  

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 20: William Steig (Part 3)

We continue with this series of advertising work by New Yorker artists, nearly all of it brought to you via the tireless efforts and generosity of Warren Bernard (when others have contributed it is duly noted). William Steig, one the gods of the New Yorker cartoon world did a lot (a lot) of advertising work. He’s the first in this series to rate a Part 3 (with a potential Part 4 in the future). Dates for ads: AmEX, 1952; Pennzoil, 1952; Dupont, 1946; Nestle’s Quik, 1953; Delco, 1960.   

Here’s Mr. Steig’s listing on the Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

 

Interview of Interest: Barry Blitt; Fave Photos of the Day: Gross, Eckstein, Booth, Byrnes, Nguyen, Cotham, and Le Lievre

From Politico, “‘Wry Titters’ in the Age of Trump” — an interview with Barry Blitt, who has an anthology of his work coming out next week.

________________________________________________________________

Fave Photos of the Day

New Yorker cartoonist, Julia Suits took these fine photos at 1 World Trade Center (home of the New Yorker) this past September. My thanks to Ms. Suits for allowing them to be posted here.

Above: standing left-right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Pat Byrnes, George Booth.  Seated: Frank Cotham.

Below: Sam Gross and George Booth 

Glen Le Lievre in silhouette

Sam Gross, Jeremy Nguyen, and Frank Cotham

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Edward Sorel & Company; Karen Green Pencilled; A Cartoon Companion Two-fer: Mick Stevens Interviewed (Pt.1) & The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Dissected; Tilley Watch Online

Fave Photo of the Day: Edward Sorel & Company

Edward Sorel had a few friends over for lunch yesterday; a splendid time was had by all.

Front row, l-r: Danny Shanahan, Edward Sorel.  Back row, l-r: Michael Maslin, a wooden St. Peter,  James McMullan, and John Cuneo

(photo courtesy of Danny Shanahan who used the time-delay function on his phone)

_____________________________________________________________________

Columbia’s Comics & Cartoons Curator, Karen Green Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils features Karen Green, who is the Comics & Cartoon Curator at Columbia University.  A good read!

________________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion Two-fer: Mick Stevens Interview (Pt.1) and the Latest New Yorker Cartoons Dissected

The Cartoon Companion‘s Max & Simon are back with a close look at the cartoons in the New Yorker’s latest issue as well as part one of an interview with veteran New Yorker cartoonist, Mick Stevens.  Read the Stevens interview here And read the CC’s take on the current issue here.

________________________________________________________________

…a Halloween video from the Cartoon Department…Daily Shouts from Ward Sutton, and Will McPhail (who seems to be in a Rear Window-esque mood lately — a recent piece for Esquire also featured a city building with individuals in various windows), and Daily Cartoons by, among others, Peter Kuper, and Kim Warp.  See it all here.  

Wertz Well Received; Attempted Bloggery with Leo Cullum on the Money, an Original Arthur Getz New Yorker Cover, and Arno in College (Humor)

From the New York Times, October 17, 2017, “A Graphic Novelist’s Passionate Anatomy of New York”  — this review of Julia Wertz’s Tenements, Towers & Trash (with Roz Chast content as well)

____________________________________________________________________

Cullum, Getz and Arno on Attempted Bloggery

Head on over to Attempted Bloggery for an interesting variety of posts on Leo Cullum, Arthur Getz and Peter Arno.