Tilley Watch Online; Attempted Bloggery Continues Its Hoff Fest

Fewer Daily cartoons this week (undoubtedly due to last week’s long weekend): Jeremy Nguyen’s take on a recent Facebook fad; Ellis Rosen mixes politics with a (potentially harmful) fad; a return visit to the Wall (not Pink Floyd’s Wall) with Peter Kuper, and finally some alternate pussy hats. Over on Daily Shouts, “Just Google It” by Sam Marlow.

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Attempted Bloggery Continues Its Hoff Fest

There are two more Syd Hoff drawings under the heading People You Could Murder.  See them here on Attempted Bloggery. 

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Even More Hoff; Chast with Ukulele

The Cartoon Companion‘s “Max” and “Simon” are back, taking a close look at the New Yorker cartoons in the issue of January 22, 2018.  Visit the site here!

Cartoons in this issue by:________________________________________________________________

Even More Hoff

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery keeps the spotlight on little seen work by the late great Syd Hoff. See it here!

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Roz Chast with Ukulele

From In Your Face New York, this notice of an appearance by Ms. Chast on stage with ukulele partner, Patricia Marx.

 

New Yorker Pokes Fun; Hoff Week Continues; Sikoryak Heads North to The Center for Cartoon Studies

Last Tuesday’s Daily Cartoon (by Jeremy Nguyen) gets some attention: “New Yorker Pokes Fun at Donald Trump with Google Culture and Arts App”

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Hoff Week Continues at Attempted Bloggery

Further obscure Hoff courtesy of Attempted Bloggery. Check it out here!

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R. Sikoryak Next Visiting Artist at Center for Cartoon Studies

The New Yorker cover artist heads north to Vermont’s CCS. (Not much) info here.

A New Yorker State of Mind Enters 1929; Hoff Week Continues on Attempted Bloggery; More Spills with Charles Addams & Art Young

A New Yorker State of Mind Enters 1929

One of the Spill‘s favorite blogs has rounded the corner of 1928, and has entered 1929.  The issue above, with art by the incredible Rea Irvin, has always been a favorite.  Visit the blog here.

Here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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Hoff Week Continues on Attempted Bloggery

And another fave blog, Attempted Bloggery continues its salute to Syd Hoff. Check it out here!

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Charles Addams is among the nominated for the Eisner Hall of Fame, 2018. Details here (with the complete list of nominees). 

…a short appreciation of Art Young here from the Washington Times-Reporter. 

 

A Syd Hoff Salute From Attempted Bloggery; Donald Reilly’s Work at Cooper Union

A Syd Hoff Salute From Attempted Bloggery

Well this will be fun.  Attempted Bloggery begins a salute to the late great Syd Hoff today.  See it here!

Here’s Mr. Hoff’s entry on the Spill’s  A-Z:

Syd Hoff ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Website: http://www.sydhoff.org/

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Donald Reilly’s Work at Cooper Union

From Cooper Union, “Donald Reilly’s New Yorker Legacy”

— the above piece found its way to the Spill courtesy of David Pomerantz. My thanks to him.

…and an additional piece Spilled a few years ago about CU alum Edward Sorel, Liana Finck, and Jon Agee: “Cooper Cartoonists at The New Yorker”

 

Mr. Reilly’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Donald Reilly ( Pictured above in the mid 1980s. Photograph by Liza Donnelly) Born, Scranton, Pa. November 11, 1933; died, Wilton, Ct., June 18, 2006. Graduated from Muhlenberg College in 1955 with a bachelor’s degree in English; received a certificate in fine arts from Cooper Union in 1963. NYer work: 1964 -2006; 1,107 cartoons and 16 covers. Rumored to have been on the shortlist in consideration to succeed James Geraghty as The New Yorker’s Art Editor (Lee Lorenz, in his book The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, said Reilly was “Geraghty’s choice” to succeed him). William Shawn eventually appointed Lee Lorenz to the position in 1973

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of January 22, 2018

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 I enjoy the little drama of seeing the new New Yorker cover pop up on the screen early Monday morning when I go to the digital issue; sometimes there is no Monday morning  drama because the cover has been released (online) days earlier. The magazine occasionally does this with of-the-moment covers. That’s the case this week — Anthony Russo‘s “In the Hole” appeared online days ago (I continue to wonder why New Yorker covers need titles, a practice that began with Tina Brown’s second issue, October 12, 1992). The last untitled New Yorker cover, issue of October 5, 1992  was Edward Sorel‘s punk in a hansom cab — the first Tina Brown era cover:

The very next issue, October 12, 1992:

This latest issue’s cartoons start off well with Bruce Kaplan‘s Alice in Wonderland drawing. It’s graphically more complex than his usual style. The caption is excellent. Way to go.

Next up, four pages later, is a Farley Katz concert drawing. I enjoyed hovering over this drawing, looking at the details, especially the drums and drummer. Just three pages later, a couple of texting turtles via Liana Finck. For some reason — I don’t believe I’ve ever thought or said this before about any cartoon (other than one of my own) — I really wanted this drawing to be ever-so-slightly colored-in. Perhaps the largeness of the landscape surrounding the turtles reminded me of how Guy Billout handles his pages.  

Six pages later, a fun Drew Dernavich drawing of a situation almost every driver has encountered: the hunt for a space. Coupled with a long-time favorite cartoonist scenario (the person crawling along the desert) and bingo!  My only wish here would have been for the cartoon to have more breathing room around it.  On the very next page, another drawing that would’ve benefited from a little bit more space on the page (hey what can I say, in the balancing act between text and cartoons, I always notice when there’s an imbalance). In Maddie Dai‘s cartoon we return to the Sistine Chapel (where Julia Suits was not too long ago). Reminder: if you haven’t seen the Michelangelo exhibit at the Met, better hurry.

Five pages later, a splendid Edward Koren drawing. And…it’s placed beautifully on the page.  You can’t ask or more, folks.

On the very next page, a history lesson from Sara Lautman:  how did the Great Lakes come to be called the Great Lakes.  Interesting drawing —  I like the scenario Ms. Lautman’s given us. 

Three pages later, a cold & flu season contribution from P.C. Vey.  The little drawing within the drawing is very funny. The aforementioned Julia Suits has the next drawing (on the very next page after Mr. Vey’s). The drawing makes use of the “what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas” armature. The setting is very George Boothian.  

On the opposite page a William Haefeli drawing drawing upon the Bob Newhart showism: “Don’t go to bed mad.” Words of wisdom then and now. On the next page, a Teresa Burns Parkhurst captionless drawing (and the second cold & flu drawing in the issue).  Elevator bank drawings are not seen all that often anymore. I like that the drawing was allowed to spread across three columns, allowing us to mosey on over to the pay-off.

Five pages later, Shannon Wheeler brings a very in-the-news item on home.  This could easily have been one of those drawings that are sometimes placed below the table of contents.  Good stuff. 

Six pages later, an Ed Steed scenario ( a category within itself). Dead (?) fish, in a cage, not a tank. The use of color offsets the mystery…just a little.

Eight pages later, courtesy of Mick Stevens, an advice-seeking court jester. Don’t know if this drawing has anything to do with current domestic politics (in particular, a current politician) but it feels like it does.  On the opposite page, a Mary Lawton “meet the…” scenario. “Meet the…” drawings seem to be making a comeback. This particular one seems true-to-life (with the exception of the two hours displayed on the sign.  I’ve a feeling you could meet those people during all business hours). 

Five pages later, the last drawing of the issue (not counting the caption contest cartoons).  Tom Toro‘s penchant for detail is put to great use. Funny drawing. I wish it wasn’t slammed up against an ad though. I don’t believe the balancing act mentioned earlier (with text and cartoons) should ever include advertisements and cartoons. Cartoons hugging editorial text: yea. Cartoons hugging ads: nay.  Just sayin’. 

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Update: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of The Town masthead still missing. This is what it looks like: