Books of Interest: Chris Ware, Bruce Eric Kaplan

Two books by notable stylists, both coming out many months from now, both contribute covers and  cartoons to The New Yorker. 

Monograph by Chris Ware, due October 10th from Rizzoli.

  From the publisher:“Arranged chronologically with all thoughtful critical and contemporary discussion common to the art book genre jettisoned in favor of Mr. Ware’s unchecked anecdotes and unscrupulous personal asides, the author-as-subject has nonetheless tried as clearly and convivially as possible to provide a contrite, companionable guide to an otherwise unnavigable jumble of product spanning his days as a pale magnet for athletic upperclassmen’s’ ire up to his contemporary life as a stay-at-home dad and agoraphobic graphic novelist.”

 

 

…and this offering from Bruce Eric Kaplan, coming out in the Spring of 2018 from Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

From the publisher:“Two words throw a family’s car trip into utter (and smelly) chaos in this hilarious story of denial from Bruce Eric Kaplan. The Krupkes are having a nice, peaceful Saturday morning drive to the grocery store when: it happens.”

Liza Donnelly Live Draws Coney Island’s Cyclone; An Arno Puzzle Piece Surfaces; A MAD Update

Liza Donnelly Live Draws Coney Island’s Cyclone

Wearing her CBS Resident Cartoonist hat, Liza Donnelly recently visited the Coney Island boardwalk to live draw various sights, including the famous Cyclone, which is celebrating its 90th birthday today. Click here to see all of her CBS Coney Island drawings

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An Arno Puzzle Piece Surfaces

When I completed my biography of Peter Arno in the early months of 2016, there were still a few unsolved pieces of the Arno puzzle.  One of them was the drawing shown here.  While still attending The Hotchkiss School,  Arno was awarded First Prize For Art in a Yale prep school competition.  This drawing appeared in the June 1,  1921 Yale Record, approximately fifteen months  before he began his first and last year at Yale.  It’s an important link piece connecting two phases of his life (Hotchkiss and Yale) when art began to grab hold of him and he began to grab hold of his art. You can see that his drawing ability was already well along: his expertise in the use of light and shadow, his confidence in execution, and of course the presence of the drawing itself on the page.  All the ingredients (save one: sex) in place for the decades of beautiful art to come.  The Nightmare — A Broken String could’ve easily appeared in any early issue of The New Yorker.  Winning the Yale prize was important enough to Arno that he mentioned it in his unpublished memoir, I Reached for the Moon

My thanks to two Yalies:  Don Watson, who found the drawing, and Michael Gerber, who passed it along to me.  Mr. Watson has been working on a comprehensive biography of all the major cartoonists of The Yale Record, and Mr. Gerber is the tirelessly enthusiastic  Publisher of The American Bystander.

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MAD Update

After asking Whither MAD just a few days ago, there’s this news from Tom Richmond’s blog. 

 

 

Resist! #2 Arrives July 4th With An Abundance of New Yorker Contributors

 

The second issue of Resist!, a free “political comics zine of mostly female artists” (a “Man Cave” section is included) edited by Nadja Spiegelman and The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, will be distributed this coming July 4th in comic book stores and out on the streets by volunteers (approximately 60,000 copies of the first Resist! were distributed this past January).

Go here to find out where you can find a copy near you

According to a press release “the free distribution of Resist! is intended as an Independence Day celebration of the First Amendment, of our diverse country and of our resilience.”

The Editors write in the introductory pages of #2: “These pages contain many individual realities.  They reflect topics as diverse as their contributors: the environment, immigration, racism and the economy.”

Artists represented in this 96 page anthology are from all over the world, but as the Spill’s focus is  primarily New Yorker contributors, I’m  listing the artists whose work has been published there.  In order of appearance:  Roz Chast, Kendra Allenby, Carol Lay, Ana Juan, Anita Kunz, Emily Flake, Amy Kurzweil, Kim Warp, Abigail Gray Swartz, Andrea Arroyo, Liniers, John Cuneo, Tom Toro, Peter Kuper,  Frank Viva, Paul Karasik, Art Spiegelman, R. Sikoryak, Dean Rohrer, Shannon Wheeler, and Daniel Clowes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, link here to the Resist! website.

Credits:

Resist! #2 cover by Malika Fravre, a French artist living in London, England.

Across the Great Red States by Kendra Allenby, a cartoonist and storyboard artist living in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker

“We’re looking for something that says ‘Death to the Patriarchy’…” by Amy Kurzweil, author of Flying Couches: A Graphic Memoir.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker.

All art copyrighted by the respective artists.

 

Exhibit of Interest: Liana Finck; R.O. Blechman’s Ink Tank Collection Goes to Washington University in St. Louis

 

Exhibit of Interest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liana Finck‘s first solo exhibit in New York consists of “80 drawings from a series of work posted on Instagram over the last year.” The exhibit runs from July 19 through August 5.  Read all about the exhibit and the Equity Gallery here. 

Liana Finck’s A-Z entry on the Spill:

Liana Finck (Pictured above. Photo: John Madere) Born in 1986. Studied at Cooper Union College, 2004 – 2008. Fulbright Fellowship to Brussels, 2009. Her graphic novel A Bintel Brief was published by Ecco Press in the winter of 2013.   New Yorker work: February 25, 2013 -. Website: www.lianafinck.com/notecards/

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R.O. Blechman’s Ink Tank Collection Goes To Washington University in St. Louis

“A significant number of works and documents” from Mr. Blechman’s Ink Tank has found a permanent home at the D.B. Dowd Modern Graphic History Library at Washington University in St. Louis.  Read all about it here.

Above: a screen grab from Mr. Blechman’s classic Alka Seltzer commercial.

More BlechmanJeet Heer’s interesting 2011 interview from the Comics Journal

 

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn; Latest Cartoon Companion Posted; Q & A With Jacob Samuel

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn

 

In my hundreds of visits to the always interesting  Rodgers Book Barn in Hillsdale, New York I’d never walked in with six other New Yorker cartoonists…until yesterday.  The Book Barn’s owner, Maureen Rodgers  allowed us to sort of take over the place as we browsed and talked and generally hung out for an hour or so. 

Photo above: from left to right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Michael Maslin, Robert Leighton, Danny Shanahan, Peter Steiner, and Ken Krimstein

This group then moved on to the classic Martindale Diner, and eventually made its way to the Spill‘s world headquarters. Below is a photo of  Danny Shanahan, Ken Krimstein, and Bob Eckstein looking at a copy of Charles Addams’ Groaning Board. And that’s Sam Gross looking at Peter Arno’s Parade. (photos courtesy of Robert Leighton).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Latest Cartoon Companion Posted

Speaking of cartoons and cartoonists…the latest Cartoon Companion has been posted. The CC boys rate the latest the cartoons in the New Yorker;  this issue features, among others, the Grim Reaper playing hide-and-seek, Orpheus in an elevator, and the big bad wolf using an inhaler.  See it all here.

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A Q&A With Jacob Samuel

From CJNews.com, June 22, 2017 , “Cartoonist Depicts Millennial Misery With Slinky Hell” — this Q&A with Jacob Samuel, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Link here to visit Mr. Samuel’s website.

A Small Treasure From the Jack Ziegler Memorial; Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview, Pt.2; Looking For Eustace

A Small Treasure From The Jack Ziegler Memorial

Here are a few pages from the fine 10 page pamphlet that was available last Saturday at the memorial for Jack Ziegler. The pamphlet contains a  lovely unpublished cover (seen below) as well as a two-page  “killed” New Yorker spread (not shown) and a number of photographs of Mr. Ziegler, as well as a list of his collected work (shown below). 

 

 

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Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview Pt. 2

If you enjoyed Part 1 of the Bliss interview, no doubt you’ll want to read Pt.2…  Read Mr. Bliss’s interview here.

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Looking For Eustace

Here’s something I’ve done maybe just once before: ask Ink Spill visitors if anyone out there has something I’ve looked for for years but have yet to find. This time it’s the miniature (about 3 1/2 inches high, I believe) Eustace Tilley pictured here.  There were 500 manufactured by Sebastian Miniatures back in 1949 (apparently there’s a newer version, from 1981, with a black base.  Only 6 of those were made).  For me, this 1949 Tilley has become the Holy Grail of New Yorker “stuff” (the little bit of information I found about it comes from a book, The Sebastian Miniature Collection by Dr. Glenn Johnson).

If anyone out there has one and would be willing to trade for a couple of my New Yorker original drawings, please contact me.

Show of Interest: Tom Bachtell’s Talk of The Town Illustrations; Whither MAD Magazine?; Roz Chast’s Tiny Shirts

Show of Interest

If you’ve opened up the New Yorker to The Talk of The Town you’ve seen Tom Bachtell’s work.  Now you can see the drawings in person at The Bower Center For the Arts .

Here’s a fine article  about the exhibit and Mr. Bachtell.

Link here to Tom Bachtell’s website.

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Whither MAD Magazine?

Every so often I post something that might seem out of the range of The Spill‘s concerns, but MAD magazine is very much a part of the New Yorker cartoonist universe. Many a New Yorker cartoonist will tell you that MAD was an early comic education and inspiration.  What’s more, a number of New Yorker cartoonists contribute to MAD.  So here’s a thoughtful piece focused on a rumor concerning MAD’s fate.  

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Roz Chast’s Tiny Shirts

This photo appeared on yesterday’s Spill .  It shows Roz Chast (with the great Edward Koren looking on) working on a tiny paper shirt construction at Jack Ziegler’s memorial last Saturday.  As promised, here are the shirts (they made their way out of The Society of Illustrators to The Spill‘s archives via the vest pocket of Danny Shanahan’s jacket).

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Oslo Freedom Forum; New Yorker Cartoons and Parenting; Andrea Arroyo’s Worldwide Artists Project; Christopher Weyant on Newspapers & Editorial Cartoons; The Tilley Watch: Ellis Rosen’s Subway Drawing, Changes for The Daily Cartoon, Another Fave Photo

Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Oslo Freedom Forum

From Extranewsfeed, “Oslo Freedom Forum, 2017” — a selection of Liza Donnelly‘s live drawings from that recent event.

Link to Ms. Donnelly’s website.

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New Yorker Cartoons and Parenting

From Mental Floss, “Changing Parenting Attitudes, As Seen Through New Yorker Cartoons”

—   Indiana University sociologists “examine cultural feelings about parenting through cartoons published in The New Yorker between 1925 and 2006”

Note: The New Yorker collected a bunch of its kids cartoons back in 2001 (with a Jack Ziegler cartoon on the cover).

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Andrea Arroyo’s Worldwide Artists Project

 New Yorker cover artist, Andrea Arroyo tells Ink Spill this project was “launched hours after election. So far I have over 230 international artists participating (from over 30 countries,) and more joining weekly. The exhibit is online indefinitely and I’m planning exhibits in Alaska, New Jersey  & New York City.”

A number of New Yorker artists are represented including Tom Toro, Barry Blitt, Bob Staake, Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo (feggo), Rich Sparks, and R. SikoryakGo here for all the info, and a list of all the artists. 

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Christopher Weyant on Newspapers and Editorial Cartoons

From Editor & Publisher, “Digital Publishing: Why Newspapers Need to Invest More in Political Cartoons” — long-time New Yorker cartoonist Christopher Weyant has been studying just that.  Read it here.

 

 

 

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…Nice to see: The Gothamist posted this about Ellis Rosen’s current New Yorker cartoon.  Visit Mr. Rosen’s website here.

 

…Visitors to The New Yorker‘s Daily Cartoon will probably note that it has been revamped. The now defunct version featured one of the magazine’s cartoonists work for a number of weeks (sometimes months). This new version abandons the one cartoonist model and presents a variety of cartoonists work within the week. 

…Here’s another favorite photo from Jack Ziegler’s memorial last Saturday at the Society of Illustrators. We see Roz Chast working on some tiny paper shirt constructions (yes, tiny shirt constructions), with Edward Koren looking on.  The Spill will post scans of the shirts in a few days. (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).