Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists; Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists

Here’s a short Kickstarter video for Lobster Therapy & Moose Pickup Lines by Maine cartoonists Bill Woodman, John Klossner, and David Jacobson (and one very-close-to-the Maine-border-cartoonist, Mike Lynch).

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Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” & “Simon” focus on all the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker — the issue with the Hockney on the cover. Read it all here.

Video of Interest: New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor Talks to Caption Contest Whiz Kid; New Yorker State of Mind’s Look at the March 30, 1929 New Yorker

Video of Interest: New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor Talks To Caption Contest Whiz Kid

Part one of New Yorker cartoon editor, Emma Allen’s vid-chat with Alice Kassnove, the 9 year old Caption Contest Whiz Kid whose contest captions went viral not long ago.  See it here. 

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A New Yorker State of Mind’s Latest Post

One of the Spill‘s favorite blogs, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker dives deep into the issue of March 30, 1929.  See it here!

T-Shirt of Interest: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell; Four Questions:Bruce Eric Kaplan

T-Shirt of Interest: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell

From bustle.com, thred-UPS Earth Day T-Shirt Collection Hilariously Drags All of Us For Being Awful to The Planet”.with Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell content.

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Four Questions: Bruce Eric Kaplan

From Publishers Weekly, April 17, 2018, “Four Questions For Bruce Eric Kaplan”

Mr. Kaplan’s website

 

Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 23 2018

This week’s cover by David Hockney, artiste! 

First order of business: for those hoping that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead would suddenly pop up for Spring: alas, such is not the case. Here’s what it looks like, lest we forget:

And below is the barely one year old re-do. Irvin’s classic wins by a knock-out.

Last week in this space it was mentioned that illustration in that week’s issue seemed to be everywhere. This week is the same, but more so. I count 20 illustrations/photographs, including a double-page spread as well as two full pages. You might wonder why this is even mentioned. I trace it back to (some) cartoonists’ sensitivity surrounding the arrival of New York magazine.  It made liberal use of illustration and photography —  a model that spawned a flotilla of like-designed publications. There was not a cartoon in sight.

It’s interesting watching the Monday Tilley Watch trying to find its footing.  It began lightheartedly as a breezy look through each new issue, commenting on the cartoons (but not criticizing them). I’ve found, as each new issue presents itself, that there are sometimes cartoons that don’t work (for me) or that escape me (which actually is the same as not working for me). But what’s always been the most fun is coming across a cartoon that is so good its energy comes off the page or screen. I came across two in this current issue: Liana Finck’s and Bruce Eric Kaplan’s. Ms. Finck’s drawing of a sun going off to work is in Steig territory.  Mr. Kaplan’s drawing is slice of life from the school of classic New Yorker cartoons. Very good solid work.

 — See you next week

 

 

 

 

 

Personal History: First Book

Pardon this little trip down memory lane.

  In 1975 I printed this first book of mine on a creaky noisy offset press in the basement of the Print Shop at The University of Connecticut in Storrs (the Print Shop, a little paradise on campus, is no more, torn down and replaced — a la Joni Mitchell’s “Big Yellow Taxi” —  by a parking lot).

 Somewhere Above the Jugglers And Dogs might have been my senior project — or it may have just been something I wanted to do for fun. I’m fairly certain the hat on the cover is some kind of tribute to the hat on the ground in Thurber’s classic drawing, “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss?” — the drawing I place highest on a pedestal.  

After printing all the pages (enough for 50 copies of the book) I drove them to be bound at a printing plant in Hartford (each copy has three staples covered by protective black cloth). I remember showing the completed work to a dear friend who promptly told me he hated the title. Everyone’s a critic.

By the time I put this together I’d already been submitting work to the New Yorker for three or four years; all of it rejected by the magazine’s legendary art editor, James Geraghty. I can’t blame him one bit.  Here’s one of the drawings, Tom Inventing Spit. Not exactly the kind of thing the New Yorker was publishing in 1975 (in hindsight, I wish I’d called the book Tom Inventing Spit). 

 In the next two years, post-college, I honed the kind of work I’d included in this book and collected even more of it in another self-published book, 115 Drawings. By the time 115 Drawings was produced in early 1977, I’d abandoned drawings like this and moved on to dutifully submitting work edging closer to single panel cartoons. By then Lee Lorenz, who succeeded Geraghty, was routinely rejecting my New Yorker submissions.  He finally caved in mid-1977 when the magazine bought an idea of mine (drawn up by the great Whitney Darrow, Jr., and published in the New Yorker, December 26, 1977). As far as the New Yorker’s concerned, my words came first.